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TimJ

QL080 with alloy forks on ute

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Hi all.

 

We are looking at buying one of the QL080 from Waimea and mount on the deck (I understand it bolts directly onto chassis) of a ute (BT50, DMax or similar). To lift, we are looking at forks as in the picture, but in alloy, rather than steel. We are running 4 x double hives on pallets (avo/kiwifruit pollination and bush/manuka). We would not be lifting the hives with honey on board.

 

Any views on that rig, and what sort of weight capacity we should look at on the forks?

 

 

forks.png

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57 minutes ago, TimJ said:

Hi all.

 

We are looking at buying one of the QL080 from Waimea and mount on the deck (I understand it bolts directly onto chassis) of a ute (BT50, DMax or similar). To lift, we are looking at forks as in the picture, but in alloy, rather than steel. We are running 4 x double hives on pallets (avo/kiwifruit pollination and bush/manuka). We would not be lifting the hives with honey on board.

 

Any views on that rig, and what sort of weight capacity we should look at on the forks?

 

 

forks.png

The forks should have a rating

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1 hour ago, TimJ said:

Hi all.

 

We are looking at buying one of the QL080 from Waimea and mount on the deck (I understand it bolts directly onto chassis) of a ute (BT50, DMax or similar). To lift, we are looking at forks as in the picture, but in alloy, rather than steel. We are running 4 x double hives on pallets (avo/kiwifruit pollination and bush/manuka). We would not be lifting the hives with honey on board.

 

Any views on that rig, and what sort of weight capacity we should look at on the forks?

 

 

forks.png

What direction will you lift pallets? Entrance facing operator? 

The distance from toe to heel is important for balance. 

Get one purpose built, about 600-700 odd in alloy. 

Alloy is light but weak. So build it well.

I bent mine!

 

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is it a two man operation, one guiding the forks and one on the crane remote buttons?

Is the yellow ring is purposely slid along to make the pallet lift on an angle? then slid to the other end to help extract the forks after? 

I thought balance lifting point would be shackled / fixed; preferably.

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5 hours ago, TimJ said:

Hi all.

 

We are looking at buying one of the QL080 from Waimea and mount on the deck (I understand it bolts directly onto chassis) of a ute (BT50, DMax or similar). To lift, we are looking at forks as in the picture, but in alloy, rather than steel. We are running 4 x double hives on pallets (avo/kiwifruit pollination and bush/manuka). We would not be lifting the hives with honey on board.

 

Any views on that rig, and what sort of weight capacity we should look at on the forks?

 

you really need the forks to handle whatever you can pick up for the crane. so in this case 700kg.

the trouble with 4 hives at once is things get heavy fast and they don't have good weight capacity at long reach. 

also its limited reach means you won't be taking hives off a trailer.

the other way is to go for a much longer reach, but lighter weight, and load single hives.

 

aluminium, it gets really costly for minimal weight savings.

Edited by tristan
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Thanks all. Some of this feedback relates to operator training and how  the rig should be properly operated - all good points that I will cover off with the manufacturer. Tristan - I hear what you're saying about the 700kg / capacity of the crane, but that is max lift at the shortest possible extension. Push it out to 3.8m and the crane rating is down to 200kg. You do recognise this limitation in your post but my thinking is that the greater the capacity of the forks, the heavier and more expensive they will be to build, so what I want to aim at is forks that will do the job required....the rest is down to operator training and a good understanding of what we are lifting.....long way of saying, that what I'd really like to know is what the group thinks a pallet + 4 double FD hives with individual lids (& no supers) would weigh at the peak. Thanks again peeps, I really appreciate the expertise on this forum.

Edited by TimJ

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I used my crane scales to weigh pallets of hives before going onto Manuka. 4 hives on a pallet, with single brood, excluder and 2 f/d supers (wets - no honeys) weighed around 260kgs fairly consistently between the pallets, and yes I zeroed the scales with the forks on. You might have 1 less box per hive but will probably have honey/pollen so may end up being about the same anyway. My pallets are fairly heavy, bearers running both directions (for chopper strapping). Hope this helps.

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1 hour ago, MackAp said:

I used my crane scales to weigh pallets of hives before going onto Manuka. 4 hives on a pallet, with single brood, excluder and 2 f/d supers (wets - no honeys) weighed around 260kgs fairly consistently between the pallets, and yes I zeroed the scales with the forks on. You might have 1 less box per hive but will probably have honey/pollen so may end up being about the same anyway. My pallets are fairly heavy, bearers running both directions (for chopper strapping). Hope this helps.

That's good info Dave.

If my trailer  has a good load on it the crane would put that 260kg out to 5m
 

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Mount the crane at the rear of the deck if you can - you trade off a bit of road handling/comfort but gain the ability to load both deck and trailer if you need to.

 

i would agree on about 250-300kg pallet weight. Cheers

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5 hours ago, MackAp said:

I used my crane scales to weigh pallets of hives before going onto Manuka. 4 hives on a pallet, with single brood, excluder and 2 f/d supers (wets - no honeys) weighed around 260kgs fairly consistently between the pallets, and yes I zeroed the scales with the forks on. You might have 1 less box per hive but will probably have honey/pollen so may end up being about the same anyway. My pallets are fairly heavy, bearers running both directions (for chopper strapping). Hope this helps.

the thing that needs to be calculated is how heavy they are when they are to come out of the orchard. if they have an additional 20kg per hive, thats another 80kg. weights go up really quickly when dealing with quads.

that extra weight shortens up the crane reach.

 

12 hours ago, TimJ said:

but my thinking is that the greater the capacity of the forks, the heavier and more expensive they will be to build, so what I want to aim at is forks that will do the job required...

yes, but the problem is people will always use it to lift more than what the forks can handle because the crane can lift it.

cost wise there is probably minimal difference between 400kg and 700kg forks. its making it out of aluminium that will make a huge difference in cost.

12 hours ago, TimJ said:

Push it out to 3.8m and the crane rating is down to 200kg.

the other thing to keep in mind, your only doing a ute load. that crane is to short for a trailer.

that means your only moving a small amount of hives and its a long way to the nearest kiwifruit orchard.

Edited by tristan

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On 5/02/2020 at 9:42 PM, tristan said:

the other thing to keep in mind, your only doing a ute load. that crane is to short for a trailer.

 

The plan would have been to unhitch and pull up along side the trailer to load/unload it. You think too short still - or ok (even though a bit fiddly)?

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6 minutes ago, TimJ said:

 

 

The plan would have been to unhitch and pull up along side the trailer to load/unload it. You think too short still - or ok (even though a bit fiddly)?

possibly still to short, but it would be very close. going to come down to crane reach and weight of the pallet load.

however dropping the trailer off, unload the ute, go back and load up the ute again for another drop off is time consuming. also you need a flat bit of ground where you can drop the trailer off.

however with some orchards where you can't tow a trailer around the orchard, there is no other way of doing it.

what might trip you up is you have to be far enough away from the trailer to be able to get the forks in. that eats up a lot of your crane reach.

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