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Fluffy

NZBF AFB notification

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Hi Guys,

I'm still very new to beekeeping =) I had my afb check done in Nov and it was all clear. I've just received an AFB notification for within 2kms of my beehives (2). Is there anything I can do for my bees? I'm really quite worried now! 2km is very close

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Worry not Fluffy, you have the huge advantage of being in the Waikato where Dr Mark Goodwin has had a program going to lower the AFB rate in the area, so having had a diseasathon, and followups it is more closely monitored than many areas. In Auck where we have what can only be described as a stupid number of apiaries, many of us are in areas where there has been a case in the last couple of years, so are showing as red on the Apiweb, but fortunately many of us have yet to have it strike us - thank goodness. just make sure you don't take risks shifting gear from hive to hive, and never have more invested in hiveware than you can afford to burn. Some who have blithely started and split/split/split, and then find they have multiple hives so burn start to moan, but they made the decision to grow the number of hives very quickly before they could recognise AFB

Please read the yellow book on The Elimination Of American Foulbrood Without the Use of Drugs by Mark Goodwin again just to help ensure you remember the details.

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11 minutes ago, Sailabee said:

Worry not Fluffy, you have the huge advantage of being in the Waikato where Dr Mark Goodwin has had a program going to lower the AFB rate in the area, so having had a diseasathon, and followups it is more closely monitored than many areas. In Auck where we have what can only be described as a stupid number of apiaries, many of us are in areas where there has been a case in the last couple of years, so are showing as red on the Apiweb, but fortunately many of us have yet to have it strike us - thank goodness. just make sure you don't take risks shifting gear from hive to hive, and never have more invested in hiveware than you can afford to burn. Some who have blithely started and split/split/split, and then find they have multiple hives so burn start to moan, but they made the decision to grow the number of hives very quickly before they could recognise AFB

Please read the yellow book on The Elimination Of American Foulbrood Without the Use of Drugs by Mark Goodwin again just to help ensure you remember the details.

Thank you for putting my mind at ease a little. I havent been on apiweb yet, might check that out. Think I may also buy another hive tool so I'm not cross contaminating hives

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1 minute ago, Fluffy said:

Thank you for putting my mind at ease a little. I havent been on apiweb yet, might check that out. Think I may also buy another hive tool so I'm not cross contaminating hives

 Hive tools are considered a very low risk, but at under $10, as far as I am conserned, would rather spend that than dig a hole to burn a hive - particularly while the clay is as hard as concrete.

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When inspecting and you turn your back for a minute or so, to get another piece of equipment or whatever, I would recommend placing a hive mat on the hive or the boxes you are inspecting.  You want to avoid robbing (an aggressive foraging behaviour) by other bees in the area.  Foraging is not nice for your hive, the beekeeper or neighbours, and at certain times of the year when it starts one of the few ways to stop it is heavy rain, or the season marching on to a flow or winter.  If there is a AFB in the area, robbing can be a way of spread.  Learn how to use your smoker properly - this also helps prevent robbing.  Although I must admit here on the Plains due to fire risk I am not using a smoker, instead a water demister.  

 

I am in the middle of a cropping area, and once crops are harvested, due to lack of pollen and nectar sources robbing is a major issue.  Makes it v difficult inspecting, and robbing bees will in a matter of seconds kill a beautiful queen.  As much as possible, in this instance I try and inspect hives early a.m. or towards dusk.  

 

Continuing education - another way to stop the spread of AFB.  Have you joined a hobbyist bee club?

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18 minutes ago, Maggie James said:

When inspecting and you turn your back for a minute or so, to get another piece of equipment or whatever, I would recommend placing a hive mat on the hive or the boxes you are inspecting.  You want to avoid robbing (an aggressive foraging behaviour) by other bees in the area.  Foraging is not nice for your hive, the beekeeper or neighbours, and at certain times of the year when it starts one of the few ways to stop it is heavy rain, or the season marching on to a flow or winter.  If there is a AFB in the area, robbing can be a way of spread.  Learn how to use your smoker properly - this also helps prevent robbing.  Although I must admit here on the Plains due to fire risk I am not using a smoker, instead a water demister.  

 

I am in the middle of a cropping area, and once crops are harvested, due to lack of pollen and nectar sources robbing is a major issue.  Makes it v difficult inspecting, and robbing bees will in a matter of seconds kill a beautiful queen.  As much as possible, in this instance I try and inspect hives early a.m. or towards dusk.  

 

Continuing education - another way to stop the spread of AFB.  Have you joined a hobbyist bee club?

No I havent. I get anxiety meeting new people and have a rather full schedule. I have done quite a bit of reading but I find hands on experiences can be different/more complex than what's written in a book etc.

 

My mum is also a hobbyist beekeeper who helps me out when I need 😃

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3 minutes ago, Fluffy said:

I get anxiety meeting new people and have a rather full schedule.

 

Well, you are certainly meeting new people on this forum!  Hope these forum meetings, help this anxiety.  

 

4 minutes ago, Fluffy said:

hands on experiences can be different/more complex than what's written in a book etc.

You have got it in one.  

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