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The great thing about Canterbury is that at this time of year all sorts of ‘other’ crops are flowering .... these ladies ate bound for the Buckeheat. The honey tastes like pig poo, but a free feed is a free feed.

The not so great thing is that at 30c the move might be a bit messy.

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A mates wife went to collect what was thought to be a swam. looks like we’ve got a job to do this weekend.🤔 Two armchairs dumped under some trees down a service alley in our little town. loo

When I was a student in Dunedin, we opened the windows to *heat* the house !

The more photos you put up James the less notice I seem to take of you're crying poor !

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28 minutes ago, jamesc said:

The great thing about Canterbury is that at this time of year all sorts of ‘other’ crops are flowering .... these ladies ate bound for the Buckeheat. The honey tastes like pig poo, but a free feed is a free feed.

The not so great thing is that at 30c the move might be a bit messy.

316AB6EF-378E-46DF-A069-E82A3F12F1FE.jpeg

Have fun. Those critters gonna crawl.

A deck alive with insects ready to sting.

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1 hour ago, John T said:

 

@yesbut Perhaps you could put in a (second, perhaps) excluder placed between two sets of two brood boxes, with the Q in each. Then monitor their laying, and see which performs best.

But, that said, who knows whether your selected Q will continue to perform well, as well as how long she will live for?

I have no idea how Q's will perform when they live close to each other - perhaps put a honey box or two between the two sets of brood boxes? Perhaps someone might know.

Perhaps put your unselected Q in a nuc as a back up should the selected Q fail after a few weeks?

Funnily enough my bees performance has never been much of a concern, as long as a couple of viable colonies  make it through winter.  My issue is an aesthetic one, I like grey/stripey bees but my neighbours don't.... 

Edited by yesbut
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2 hours ago, jamesc said:

Yeah,nah..... if you load them while they are stil flying.... everything is sweet.

just leave a weak nuc to pick up those that missed the bus!

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I always have buckwheat scattered around the garden .

Its not just a great crop for bees , but for parasitic wasps and other predators.

Also it is a good green manure crop,  grows quick , breaks down quick .

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14 hours ago, kaihoka said:

Why dont people have gardens .

I am thinking you would have a great garden and could grow anything .

Nearly ended up moving there in the 70s.  I regreat not exploring that option further .

We ended up going back down to nelson .

Lack of water. If they're going to have a garden it's a veggie garden. Plenty of flowering shrubs but many fancy things like roses. 

We only moved here in 2001, stories from the 70's make it sound pretty wild west. 

Not too late to come and visit. 

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27 minutes ago, nikki watts said:

Lack of water. If they're going to have a garden it's a veggie garden. Plenty of flowering shrubs but many fancy things like roses. 

We only moved here in 2001, stories from the 70's make it sound pretty wild west. 

Not too late to come and visit. 

I am keen to explore the north island .

I have spent far more time in australia than traveling around NZ.

I imagine the barrier in the 70s was like golden bay .

NZ population was full of young people with energy to waste , we are all old now and slower .

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1 hour ago, kaihoka said:

I am keen to explore the north island .

I have spent far more time in australia than traveling around NZ.

I imagine the barrier in the 70s was like golden bay .

NZ population was full of young people with energy to waste , we are all old now and slower .

From a yachties point of view, Barrier was brilliant - can have anchor 50 ft down, and see it in the water, and the terrain is very steep in many parts - when you are mainly rowing to shore and walking. Only one sandy beach on the western side at Catherine (or Katherine) Bay. Walking, there were many different coloured soils at any cuttings in the soil, as so many different minerals - copper mining was an early industry, and then there were the crayfish and scallops!

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The Barrier in the 1970's was rather isolated with a low population. There were only about five surnames / families and they were all a bit odd. Some people less kind than me used to suggest there was some in-breeding responsible for that, but maybe it was too much sunshine. There was nowhere on the Island that could issue a warrant of fitness, and some of the vehicles on the 'road' were hilarious. It used to take 6+ hours to get there on the passenger ferry and the freight ferry only went to Fitzroy unloading by cargo net and davit. The cargo net was responsible for tearing the RF upper suspension arm/damper off my morris minor, still drove it though, fun times and an indelible memory. I recall only one beekeeper in the Kaitoke/Medlands area and he sold comb honey.

These days it is all changed, it is the new Waiheke with houses everywhere.

I think Golden Bay was a different kettle of fish.

Edited by ChrisM
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2 hours ago, ChrisM said:

I think Golden Bay was a different kettle of fish.

Nope

Just the same .

We used to say mean things about the locals too.

we built our house /barn in the 70s up at the the top of a  4x4  only steep drive,   the  rather over weight bulding  inspector refused to walk up the hill and ticked it off  the building at the bottom of the drive

 

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5 minutes ago, kaihoka said:

Nope

Just the same .

We used to say mean things about the locals too.

we built our house /barn in the 70s up at the the top of a  4x4  only steep drive,   the  rather over weight bulding  inspector refused to walk up the hill and ticked it off  the building at the bottom of the drive

 

I only visited very briefly for the first time in the 90's.

Connected by roads and highways, I had imagined Golden Bay in the 70's was overrun with hippies, free love, communes and drugs? 

Maybe proof if it was needed, not to generalise nor stereotype or just media bias.

Maybe it was freudian, we all wanted what Golden Bay had, but we weren't allowed :) 

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In the early sixties, someone I trained with when first working married a teacher, and two weeks later shifted to a sole charge school on the barrier, and had to try and work out a month's food etc order as barge only went once a month -can remember receiving a 200 ml bottle of a really 'rugged' plum wine they made - ten hangovers in each 10 mls. Then they used to draw the surnames out of a hat, literally when enrolling at the school. The best bit was that as the end of the month approached, the locals appreciated the problem of trying to forecast the food,and kids would arrive at school with - not an apple for the teacher, but a huge pack-horse crayfish or something similar to keep them going.

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3 minutes ago, Gino de Graaf said:

Nothing the usual. Think some variety of Elephant Grass? 

I meant Wow at the dry landscape.  Never heard of Elephant Grass until now, and you might be reassured in that it makes an excellent fire break, also you can use it to make bio-gas!

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1 minute ago, Maggie James said:

I meant Wow at the dry landscape.  Never heard of Elephant Grass until now, and you might be reassured in that it makes an excellent fire break, also you can use it to make bio-gas!

Yes, dry. Done research? 

Only seen this grass a few times. When well fed, very tall. Opposite here. 

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3 hours ago, Sailabee said:

In the early sixties, someone I trained with when first working married a teacher, and two weeks later shifted to a sole charge school on the barrier, and had to try and work out a month's food etc order as barge only went once a month -can remember receiving a 200 ml bottle of a really 'rugged' plum wine they made - ten hangovers in each 10 mls. Then they used to draw the surnames out of a hat, literally when enrolling at the school. The best bit was that as the end of the month approached, the locals appreciated the problem of trying to forecast the food,and kids would arrive at school with - not an apple for the teacher, but a huge pack-horse crayfish or something similar to keep them going.

Before we were able to fly groceries in, the only delivery was once a week, on  Thursday afternoon. The social club night was a Wednesday. The teachers got sick of over tired kids arriving with a tin of baked beans and a can opener for lunch so they declared Thursday brought lunch day. 😁

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49 minutes ago, nikki watts said:

Before we were able to fly groceries in, the only delivery was once a week, on  Thursday afternoon. The social club night was a Wednesday. The teachers got sick of over tired kids arriving with a tin of baked beans and a can opener for lunch so they declared Thursday brought lunch day. 😁

everyone must have had big  vege gardens.

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BEING SENSIBLE IN CASE OF FIRE 

 

SO WE HAVE JAMES WITH AN INCREDIBLY SENSIBLE & PRACTICAL STAINLESS STEEL TANK & LARGE HOSE

 

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THEN WE HAVE GOT GINO WITH HIS ELEPHANT GRASS FIREBREAKS

 

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TODAY I WAS IN A MATING YARD IN THE TOWNSHIP & POKED MY HEAD OVER THE FENCE TO TALK TO THE NEIGHBOUR.  FORTUNATELY IT WAS A VERY HIGH FENCE.  NO STAINLESS STEEL TANK, BUT A LARGE HOSE!  SOMEHOW I MANAGED TO STOP THE PHONE SHAKING WHILE I TOOK THE SNAP!

 

 

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Edited by Maggie James
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1 hour ago, Maggie James said:

BEING SENSIBLE IN CASE OF FIRE 

TODAY I WAS IN A MATING YARD IN THE TOWNSHIP & POKED MY HEAD OVER THE FENCE TO TALK TO THE NEIGHBOUR.  FORTUNATELY IT WAS A VERY HIGH FENCE.  NO STAINLESS STEEL TANK, BUT A LARGE HOSE!  SOMEHOW I MANAGED TO STOP THE PHONE SHAKING WHILE I TOOK THE SNAP!

 

 

 

Crikey Maggie.. 😳

 

i don’t have a flash water tanker or a flash truck to put it on.. or flash fire resistant elephant grass..

but i do have lots of them orange buckets... which this time of year are filled with water and travel on the ute deck.. 

that and not using the smoker at all of course . 

Forests are closed, farm is a tinder box and a couple of scrub fires are burning fairly close to home tonight.. 

 

 

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10 hours ago, Maggie James said:

BEING SENSIBLE IN CASE OF FIRE 

 

SO WE HAVE JAMES WITH AN INCREDIBLY SENSIBLE & PRACTICAL STAINLESS STEEL TANK & LARGE HOSE

 

9FF34A6E-7FB0-4924-BF37-C1B9436AF98C.jpeg

 

THEN WE HAVE GOT GINO WITH HIS ELEPHANT GRASS FIREBREAKS

 

DSC_0450_copy_1376x774.JPG.03a1bf1c8c96087875b7db8d6eeb8314.JPG

 

 

TODAY I WAS IN A MATING YARD IN THE TOWNSHIP & POKED MY HEAD OVER THE FENCE TO TALK TO THE NEIGHBOUR.  FORTUNATELY IT WAS A VERY HIGH FENCE.  NO STAINLESS STEEL TANK, BUT A LARGE HOSE!  SOMEHOW I MANAGED TO STOP THE PHONE SHAKING WHILE I TOOK THE SNAP!

 

 

WP_20200203_002.jpg

Much success in the mating yard♥️

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