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Restructuring the fleet...possibly


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We call that the "the gate bitch" and they sit on the passengers side.

I get to drive when there’s two trucks loaded up. Himself hasn’t managed to drive two trucks simultaneously. 🤣

This is a handy little truck....The Beanie Truck’. 4x4,  two tonne capacity, no class 2 needed, carries three people and 108 boxes,  Nissan Atlas. Ticks along at 85kph, but needs softer

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1 hour ago, Gino de Graaf said:

A straight night run, be fine. It's the unknown that can be a problem.

quite right.

with small lots, if the road is closed etc you can turn around, take them back or dump them somewhere. with big trucks you can be stuck there. its a huge risk which is why most use refrigerated transport.

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2 hours ago, jamesc said:

Yep ... that's how we do it .... not quite a big truck ...... but makes  staff movement easy ....and the honey is secure behind a locked gate ..... 

I presume there is an all terrain 4WD forklift required for loading that has its own little truck.

I understand that using curtain-siders is more common, so then the whole load is hidden and somewhat contained for a minor 'unknown' without needing nets.

Maybe the trucking company didn't have a spare curtain-sider last night.

I guess I would worry about the robbing in a large dump site if doing a quick harvest with blowers, but maybe they can take a gentle approach with escapes and then fume boards if they are all back at home base. (?). good luck to them regardless.

 

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8 hours ago, ChrisM said:

I presume there is an all terrain 4WD forklift required for loading that has its own little truck.

I understand that using curtain-siders is more common, so then the whole load is hidden and somewhat contained for a minor 'unknown' without needing nets.

Maybe the trucking company didn't have a spare curtain-sider last night.

I guess I would worry about the robbing in a large dump site if doing a quick harvest with blowers, but maybe they can take a gentle approach with escapes and then fume boards if they are all back at home base. (?). good luck to them regardless.

 

I have helped do something similar. Pretty straight forward, but harvesting honey an endless chore

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4 hours ago, Gino de Graaf said:

I have helped do something similar. Pretty straight forward, but harvesting honey an endless chore

at least it would become a 9-5 job for a while with decent sleep at nights.

 

3 hours ago, jamesc said:

Aah ... the joys of commercial bee keeping. Big yards, big gear, big dollars.  Big Buzz.

yeah nah, not much joy, and I'm guessing any mistakes could be big ones.

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49 minutes ago, Dennis Crowley said:

Anyone using these still, and if so what chemical are you using.

I believe some in BoP are using it, but not sure if they are selling any honey.

Bee quick is an american product important by a Wanganui beekeeper(?).

I use it sometimes collecting swarms so they don't go back to branch/post/place.

I used it just this week for cut out in a house.

It has a strong almond smell, but isn't the unpleasant repellant that some used to use ages ago.

here is the old thread on this. 

 

So Dennis, is there some problem?

 

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On 19/02/2020 at 5:41 PM, ChrisM said:

I believe some in BoP are using it, but not sure if they are selling any honey.

Bee quick is an american product important by a Wanganui beekeeper(?).

I use it sometimes collecting swarms so they don't go back to branch/post/place.

I used it just this week for cut out in a house.

It has a strong almond smell, but isn't the unpleasant repellant that some used to use ages ago.

here is the old thread on this. 

 

So Dennis, is there some problem?

 

I think they're the ones who sold me my red led lights for my fork lift

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We used to run 1200 hives into te puke for pollination back in the day in loads of 120. No nets. Not sure that I would do that if I was playing that game now, I'm getting very careful in my old age.

 

I think that I will be continuing to run utes and trailers for the next while unless something changes. The new shed is the priority and the new industry climate means keeping things tight is probably best. Back to the old days of deciding expenditure based on the previous season and keeping a decent reserve. 

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21 minutes ago, BSB said:

We used to run 1200 hives into te puke for pollination back in the day in loads of 120. No nets. Not sure that I would do that if I was playing that game now, I'm getting very careful in my old age.

 

I think that I will be continuing to run utes and trailers for the next while unless something changes. The new shed is the priority and the new industry climate means keeping things tight is probably best. Back to the old days of deciding expenditure based on the previous season and keeping a decent reserve. 

Reminds me of the first time I had anything to do with bees. Helping move hives by ute on an orchard I worked on as a teenager in the late 70s in Tepuke. At night, no suit, socks as gloves. Had no idea what I'd got myself into. Never did that again. Must have got stung about 50 times. The boss had a good laugh though as i jumped around trying to get rid of masses of crawling bees. Wasn't good.

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17 minutes ago, YTB8TA270 said:

Reminds me of the first time I had anything to do with bees. Helping move hives by ute on an orchard I worked on as a teenager in the late 70s in Tepuke. At night, no suit, socks as gloves. Had no idea what I'd got myself into. Never did that again. Must have got stung about 50 times. The boss had a good laugh though as i jumped around trying to get rid of masses of crawling bees. Wasn't good.

Lol, sock gloves! We were so poor we shared leather gloves. As in, one has the left the other right. Gloved hand at entrance, while shifting lots of hives. 

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Ha .....

The guy I started with was so tough he  mainly wore shorts ,

And had a homemade veil he used to wear over a beanie ,

And  smoked a rolly through a hole in the veil as he worked,

 

And drove a little red truck that I have yet to find the photograph of !

 

 

Yeah, those were the days,

Six tonnes to the hundred, year in year out

No mites

No rush

No worries

Unless of course he'd run out of Durries.

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Before I did it for a living I was on my grandparents farm beekeeping as a young teenager. Dishwashing gloves, veils with holes in, grumpy bees. I had one incident where I ripped off my veil because there was a bee in it..had to take refuge in the landrover, 9 head stings later....it almost put me off the whole thing completely. 

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Nothing ever changed when we used to work as a surveillance team.  Once on Banks Peninsula we had to climb 300 m from a farm track, up a mountain to inspect a beehive.  I thought I was going to have to administer CPR.  Lots of laughs though.    And once a week, in our own time, we would stop at a really flash outfit for a cup of expensive coffee (we had to sit outdoors in the smoking area of course).  Me in a suit, and he in whatever rig was being worn that day.  Met some incredibly bizarre people, but some extremely interesting, and unlike some inspectors no commercial guy ever refused us to inspect their hives.  We used to do some really big contracts for The Rope because we always fulfilled them, he had the least complaints in NZ about us as inspectors, and we never rang him up blowing our fuse.  

17 minutes ago, jamesc said:

Ha .....

The guy I started with was so tough he  mainly wore shorts ,

And had a homemade veil he used to wear over a beanie ,

And  smoked a rolly through a hole in the veil as he worked,

 

And drove a little red truck that I have yet to find the photograph of !

 

 

Yeah, those were the days,

Six tonnes to the hundred, year in year out

No mites

No rush

No worries

Unless of course he'd run out of Durries.

 

 

 

James - As well as an apiary ID, every DECA holder (unless things have changed) had a sequential number.  Guess who DECA No1 in NZ is?  it's not me.  

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On 2/02/2020 at 12:46 PM, ChrisM said:

Harvest time with 3 in the cab is uncomfortable, but ok if it rarely happens.

 

When i started out there were 3 of us in the cab, all the time, every day.

 

Middle guy had the gear stick between his legs, but the guy on the left was on gate opening / closing duty, so it was a toss up.

 

We were young, did what we were told, didn't worry about it.

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On 23/02/2020 at 9:06 AM, Maggie James said:

Nothing ever changed when we used to work as a surveillance team.  Once on Banks Peninsula we had to climb 300 m from a farm track, up a mountain to inspect a beehive.  I thought I was going to have to administer CPR.  Lots of laughs though.    And once a week, in our own time, we would stop at a really flash outfit for a cup of expensive coffee (we had to sit outdoors in the smoking area of course).  Me in a suit, and he in whatever rig was being worn that day.  Met some incredibly bizarre people, but some extremely interesting, and unlike some inspectors no commercial guy ever refused us to inspect their hives.  We used to do some really big contracts for The Rope because we always fulfilled them, he had the least complaints in NZ about us as inspectors, and we never rang him up blowing our fuse.  

 

 

 

James - As well as an apiary ID, every DECA holder (unless things have changed) had a sequential number.  Guess who DECA No1 in NZ is?  it's not me.  

I have no idea 😊 .... I'm gonna find that truck photo one of these days.

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On 23/02/2020 at 9:25 AM, Alastair said:

 

When i started out there were 3 of us in the cab, all the time, every day.

 

Middle guy had the gear stick between his legs, but the guy on the left was on gate opening / closing duty, so it was a toss up.

 

We were young, did what we were told, didn't worry about it.

Sounds like me as a young fella, carting thousands of full depth honey boxes to the truck, used to run when doing the gates 

And was keen every day.

 

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9 hours ago, Alastair said:

Who did you work for Maru?

 

If i didn't run to open the gate, probably get a boot in the backside.

Worst thing about living in the country is gates .

Esp coming home late at night in the rain .

I bet beeks have a very low opinion of them too.

 

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Talking about restructuring the fleet, the Ozzies are doing a lot of work on electric trucks https://www.sea-electric.com/. Dare I suggest the cybertruck could be a competitor to the cruiser in future too. Just for fun, I attach a link to a look at the electric vehicles and fossil fuel ones, where if we all had electric vehicles and then petrol/diesel ones came along later if we would all change from electric. https://thedriven.io/2020/02/24/what-if-we-proposed-a-transition-from-electric-to-petrol-cars/?fbclid=IwAR2tqRDgtLAljgnz-67UlQBj8clto3LH00QV5ilqb3YamwSuJ0GZgW9jIs8

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17 minutes ago, ChrisM said:

Talking about restructuring the fleet, the Ozzies are doing a lot of work on electric trucks https://www.sea-electric.com/. Dare I suggest the cybertruck could be a competitor to the cruiser in future too. Just for fun, I attach a link to a look at the electric vehicles and fossil fuel ones, where if we all had electric vehicles and then petrol/diesel ones came along later if we would all change from electric. https://thedriven.io/2020/02/24/what-if-we-proposed-a-transition-from-electric-to-petrol-cars/?fbclid=IwAR2tqRDgtLAljgnz-67UlQBj8clto3LH00QV5ilqb3YamwSuJ0GZgW9jIs8

Very interesting article , so sensible .

Its such a shame our society is not swayed by sensible arguments these days .

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