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Hilarious is right!  Rene knows his stuff. I’ve had the pleasure of sharing his ute around risk sites sniffing out the dreaded foulbrood.  Rochelle also.. (James wife)..  one mission sp

i'll be my usual blunt self and say only some of it is laziness. there is those who are anti establishment and they tend to get known and can be dealt with.  the rest tend to be the fruit cakes.

Maggie this is a popular opinion but i don't think it is actually the case.   The levies the "good" beekeepers pay are not subsidising the "bad" beekeepers. The money the "good" beekeepers a

Rene did a demo at a local commercials a few years ago, details were posted on here, anyone could go and only four hobbyists and one small commercial turned up, I was shocked - I thought there would be a huge crowd, bonus for the small group who did bother - was so worth the trip.

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Hilarious is right! 

Rene knows his stuff. I’ve had the pleasure of sharing his ute around risk sites sniffing out the dreaded foulbrood. 

Rochelle also.. (James wife).. 

one mission springs to mind.. I’m at work in the office and receive a call from Rene regarding the night befores foulbrood sniff session.. 

he had received a call from the Police questioning his previous evenings activities after a concerned member of the public had seen his vehicle and people lifting a “sheep” over a gate and into the back of his ute! 

I had to call the local small towns copper to explain it was in fact a dog we had lifted over the gate into his well sign written ute. 

 

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Well good at least somebody reported their suspicions.

 

Had it actually been a sheep rustler would have been great to nab one of them. They could go do some honest hunting but no, it's easier to get an easy feed by ruining somebody's life. They should be sent to North Korea for 15 years hard labour.

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On 19/01/2020 at 3:23 PM, Dr Mark Goodwin said:

 

The way ahead is to instate the workshops that the beekeeping industry were told were going to occur then the voted on the strategy. 

 

A discussion AFB workshops started late last year. But a question raised: "what topics would attract you to attend such a workshop?"

e.g. information on any outbreaks, information on actions being taken against AFB recidivists, new bacteriophage discoveries, new detection tools, new dog information, hive check methods, beginner information, <topic of interest here>.

We realise this may differ from hobbiests to commercials but 1. would you attend a workshop and 2. what would you want to see in it to make it worth your time ?  [JM]

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Even with the course for a DECA, very few actually of the courses have very good frames for class participants to have a look at, just improving that would be an immense help - particularly for the hobbyists - can't remember how many I have sat through, and usually at best a frame with a few cells, and over 20 students - what about all the times there is a major breakout - how about making some of those available?

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1 hour ago, ApiNZ Science & Research said:

"what topics would attract you to attend such a workshop?"

All of the above topics mentioned, packed into one day.  What about adding a sniffer dog demo, plus demo destroying and disposing of an AFB hive.  Presentation re % of monies reclaimed off recidivists for inspection and destruction.  A decent video of an acceptable method to inspect a beehive for AFB without increasing the likelihood of damaging the queen!

 

What does new detection tools mean? Does this refer to in the field or lab?

 

Workshop must commence at specified time advertised with appropriate breaks, and the room must not be an icebox!  

 

A whizzy workshop, sounds like a good idea.  

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The frames I have for demonstration purposes are normally frozen and while these are better than nothing they are not as good as fresh. If  you learn to recognise what healthy brood looks like then you will recognise disease when you see it . There is considerable crossover of symptoms between different diseases and even the experts occasionally get it wrong or need confirmation from something like a test kit. Personally I think phone app is really good and carries no disease risk.

If the person teaching the class  doesn't have  a rotten frame to show everybody surely that shows they are doing their job properly and they don't let their hives get to that stage.

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Is there actually a problem out  there with AFB recognition?
If not, why continue spend money on the basis that there is a recognition problem.

Identify the real problem and investigate ways to address that problem.
Its been said before that AFB recognition is actually a simple matter.

 

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28 minutes ago, Philbee said:

Is there actually a problem out  there with AFB recognition?
If not, why continue spend money on the basis that there is a recognition problem.

Identify the real problem and investigate ways to address that problem.
Its been said before that AFB recognition is actually a simple matter.

 

Yes there is a problem, or else the AP 2's would not be finding so much of the AFB - someone - perhaps @Alastair who quoted something like 30% of the cases.

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There is definitely a problem whether it's inability with recognition or other causes.   People need to get enthused to go to recognition courses, and I think interesting workshops at central comfortable, easily accessible venues that are acceptable to both hobbyists and commercials to attend would be a good start.  Some of the disease recognition courses struggle to get numbers until the last minute.  Outfits with staff need to be encouraged to send their staff.  Workshops are generic, and I think it would be a good idea if a few administrators of outfits were to attend.  I have heard some abhorrent stories about how AFB checks are carried out in outfits, and the expected time frames (excuse the pun) for inspecting hives.  

 

No wonder there are so many queens killed (leading to colony loss), and so much AFB missed.  

There are some events that I think it is good for hobbyists and commercial to mix, and I think these hopefully proposed workshops are a good example.  

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3 hours ago, Sailabee said:

Yes there is a problem, or else the AP 2's would not be finding so much of the AFB - someone - perhaps @Alastair who quoted something like 30% of the cases.

Yes of course but are those 30%  due to ignorance or arrogance?

There is no denying the problem but has the problem been correctly diagnosed?

 

Also, 30% is a lot and if the sample is random then that must point to a 30% infection rate across, say Auckland??
Not too sure about that

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Not quite how that worked Phil.

 

What Sailabee was refering to was the last seasons figures given in the AFB report in a recent Beekeeper magazine, that i quoted here.

 

Which were, they gave the total number of reported AFB cases, and how many of those had been found by the hive owners, and how many had been found by AP2's. Around a third of all reported AFB that had been found, was found by AP2's.

 

Of course it's likely that a lot more AFB was found by beekeepers, but not reported. But since that information is known only to the non compliant beekeepers who didn't report, the AFBPMP just have to work with the figures they have. 

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As I have sat through the course more often than most - either commercial or hobbyist over the last few years, I would say that many of us who have only encountered very few - in my case one hive - of someone else's hive with AFB, I think I know what I am looking for, but can only persist with inspections and hope I have it right, and take whatever opportunities that turn up to see the hives with confirmed cases, prior to burning. 

One of the contributing factors is the seasonal nature of beekeeping and the number who are only working in the industry during the summer months - increasingly imported into NZ for the season and learning what is needed on the job, returning home at seasons end. There doesn't seem any mechanism requiring commercials to have a minimum number of DECA holders/X hundred hives, so many of those inspections are done by unqualified inspectors. 

All registered hobbyist hives are inspected by DECA holders, there is no alternative for us, thank goodness.

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Agree with that Sailabee, to me, seasonal contracts are a plague on the industry. 

 

For one thing, a young guy cannot go to the bank to take out a mortgage to buy a house, because he does not have a guaranteed job. Bee workers are reduced to virtual paupers where in fact it is a highly skilled job and deserving of better.

 

I have a friend who did 2 seasonal contracts with a large corporate, he told me there were no dedicated AFB inspections, AFB was only found if someone noticed it while doing something else. Because of time pressure they didn't look very hard and cases were usually pretty severe before being noticed. I asked him if there was much AFB in the whole outfit and his reply was "yeah heaps".

 

 

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21 hours ago, Maggie James said:

All of the above topics mentioned, packed into one day.  What about adding a sniffer dog demo, plus demo destroying and disposing of an AFB hive.  Presentation re % of monies reclaimed off recidivists for inspection and destruction.  A decent video of an acceptable method to inspect a beehive for AFB without increasing the likelihood of damaging the queen!

 

What does new detection tools mean? Does this refer to in the field or lab?

 

Workshop must commence at specified time advertised with appropriate breaks, and the room must not be an icebox!  

 

A whizzy workshop, sounds like a good idea.  

 

One day Maggie? Would others want a whole day?  The current thinking is perhaps a morning or afternoon . . but the whole day? Thanks for the thoughts . . 

New detection tools could include latest on the use of dogs and also new laboratory tests (qPCR) that Plant and Food, MPI and others have been working on [JM].

 

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it probably writes off a day regardless. If one of these is held every time 20 or more (?) people sign up for it, it probably involves some travel within each province. So, if the start is 10am and finish is 3pm then it is kind of half a day with people travelling a couple of hours each way including the presenters themselves needing to get there and home again; cost effectively.

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6 hours ago, ApiNZ Science & Research said:

One day Maggie? Would others want a whole day?  The current thinking is perhaps a morning or afternoon . . but the whole day? Thanks for the thoughts . . 

New detection tools could include latest on the use of dogs and also new laboratory tests (qPCR) that Plant and Food, MPI and others have been working on [JM].

 

5 hours ago, ChrisM said:

it probably writes off a day regardless. If one of these is held every time 20 or more (?) people sign up for it, it probably involves some travel within each province. So, if the start is 10am and finish is 3pm then it is kind of half a day with people travelling a couple of hours each way including the presenters themselves needing to get there and home again; cost effectively.

 

I agree with ChrisM's opinion.  Give it a whirl 10-3pm.  You will soon know if a full day is required, or whether a full day is something that evolves a few years down the track.

 

I am sure the beekeeping community of Canterbury (ApiNZ or non ApiNZ, commercial or hobbyist) would be happy to be a trial case.  

 

I think I can safely say we will grab the opportunity of education - whether it be for experienced or inexperienced beekeepers.  Let us know when it should be diaried.  

 

 

 

What would the cost be to attendees?

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