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The reason we still have lotsa honey in the shed is that no one is interested in buying it.... whatever the price. Strange. Meanwhile, small boy snd I did a little undet 500 ks today checking bee

Dont fight it Pink Cat, Ive never let on but feel the same way about saucers of milk

That was the 60s.  Kids were a lot more easily satisfied. And probably happier, cos after they'd eaten their honey, they had mega energy to go out and play in really physical activities; and they used

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42 minutes ago, Don Mac said:

The best option is to sell it off, even at cheap prices. Remove the inventory overhang.

The goal should be to have a 500 g pot of honey (the best in the world) in every household for a few dollars and another in the bag of every tourist leaving the country.

Nice idea Don but not really a starter.
The issue is that there is no way that the well intending Beek can control the destiny of his Honey once its given away for $3.00 a Kg.
I was talking to a Friend a few weeks ago, he owns a very large grocery store (understated).
He had no idea that the wholesale price of Honey was were it is and went on to tell me a bit of what he does see.
Cant repeat it but we are screwed every which way.

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9 hours ago, Don Mac said:

It does not matter where you keep bees, NZ's problems are the same for beekeeper's overseas.

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2020/jan/07/honeybees-deaths-almonds-hives-aoe?CMP=share_btn_fb&fbclid=IwAR3hx5PwIUNtNFTQ8n16grm8gLR_u-Shb-2XM3ZEeG9jvRL5Zkzth1xSfAk

This US Beekeeper has to compete with honey imports......we do not.

 

What concerns me is this huge market overhang. NZ should have cheap honey if that volume of honey is sitting in storage waiting for rich customer.

Many years ago the NZ Dairy Board bought up large volumes of butter in storage in Europe, processed it into dairy fats and resold it - just to get rid of the market overhang.

The only guy making money out of this volume of stored honey is the storage company or the bank manager funding it.

The best option is to sell it off, even at cheap prices. Remove the inventory overhang.

The goal should be to have a 500 g pot of honey (the best in the world) in every household for a few dollars and another in the bag of every tourist leaving the country.

I like that article....  ‘A boutique persuit of the gentleman apiarist.... who spends his dsys working his bees.... and nights perusing Bee forums...’

I know some people like that.

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With regards to the title of this thread , I have just started a batch of Manuka mead . If things get really bad , it may end up getting distilled into manukashine ! 

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8 minutes ago, Jas said:

With regards to the title of this thread , I have just started a batch of Manuka mead . If things get really bad , it may end up getting distilled into manukashine ! 

Others are doing this and it is a great example of how to add value to Honey.
If the Scotch can be famous for Scotch Whiskey and the same for many others in that Vein then NZ could be famous for Mead.
I drink a bit of it and believe there is  importunity in it.
@Jay needs to speak up because he is a pro who produces a really drinkable product. 

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10 minutes ago, Philbee said:

Others are doing this and it is a great example of how to add value to Honey.
If the Scotch can be famous for Scotch Whiskey and the same for many others in that Vein then NZ could be famous for Mead.
I drink a bit of it and believe there is  importunity in it.
@Jay needs to speak up because he is a pro who produces a really drinkable product. 

I acknowledge that I may be a bit odd but I've always thought it really weird the way alcohol has so much attraction to so many people. 

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3 minutes ago, yesbut said:

I acknowledge that I may be a bit odd but I've always thought it really weird the way alcohol has so much attraction to so many people. 

Dont fight it Pink Cat, Ive never let on but feel the same way about saucers of milk

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4 hours ago, yesbut said:

I acknowledge that I may be a bit odd but I've always thought it really weird the way alcohol has so much attraction to so many people. 

Aaah.... alchohol is a great leveller.... it eases the stress of the day and gives rise to creativity.

That is only my humble opinion ....

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5 hours ago, jamesc said:

Aaah.... alchohol is a great leveller.... it eases the stress of the day and gives rise to creativity.

That is only my humble opinion ....

Jamesc, where you drinking when you posted this?

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7 hours ago, Dennis Crowley said:

Jamesc, where you drinking when you posted this?

 

3 minutes ago, Trevor Gillbanks said:

Or, more to the point.  When is he not.

 

Guilty as charged.... cold green tea is very refreshing.

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I would like to see this discussion get back to how we can improve our honey markets to make this business a long term sustainable  proposition.

So I am not going to mention any drinking.

 

My aim is to see a 500 g jar of honey in every household in NZ - provided as a low cost option.

The goal to get rid of the inventory overhang.

I cannot believe it is to hard.

Secondly I do not expect that the pariahs who run our supermarket industry will be interested in supporting it.

 

This example has been published recently by the ABC. https://www.abc.net.au/news/rural/2018-01-18/generous-farmers-free-mangoes-and-war-on-waste/9339062

The guy gives away all his B Grade Mangos for free!

Some good learning's here;

There is a huge amount of waste in the retail supermarket trade in fresh vegetables and fruit.

The elderly cannot afford a retailer selling the fruit for $3 each.

The give away is gathering interest in others wishing to buy his crop.

 

I am not suggesting that we give away our honey for free. But if a beekeeper is only getting $3 per kg, why not sell it at the door for that price if the customer brings a jar.  I am not suggesting our quality honeys are sold at this price, just the large volume of mixed flora honey.

Oh dear I have just upset the food police at MPI!

 

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The idea is there Don. 

 

But a race to the bottom price is also a recipe for bankruptcy. The reason price is where it is, is because there has already been a race to the bottom price, people doing as you have suggested. 

 

If everyone with honey in the shed took your advice and did as you say, probably wouldn't be able to get even 50 cents for it.

 

The people who have held back inventory are doing so because they just can't stomach it. 

.

The guy giving away his b grade mangos can probably still feed his family. The beekeeper selling his crop for $4, cannot.

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I grew up on an orchard .

The price for a box of peaches now is about double it was in the 60s.

Everything else is more than double .

The price of food has not kept price with the price of other stuff .

Except TVs .

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On 11/01/2020 at 1:08 PM, kaihoka said:

I grew up on an orchard .

The price for a box of peaches now is about double it was in the 60s.

Everything else is more than double .

The price of food has not kept price with the price of other stuff .

Except TVs .

 

It maybe a race to the bottom, but it can get a lot worse than just low prices.

I can remember when my father had to pay the freezing works to take and slaughter his cull ewes. It was the early 70s.

Today fat ewes are worth more than new seasons lambs.

As @kaihoka observes the price of food has always been cyclable - up and down.

 

But today we face a single dominant buyer - China. They have always used their market clout to dominate the market and the price they pay.

 

@Jamesc if no one even the local householder does not wish to buy your honey, we have a market acceptance problem in Canterbury and perhaps the rest of NZ.

 

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For a few yrs honey has been priced out of the consumers mind as a staple food.

I do not know how this thinking can be changed .

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3 hours ago, Don Mac said:

 

It maybe a race to the bottom, but it can get a lot worse than just low prices.

I can remember when my father had to pay the freezing works to take and slaughter his cull ewes. It was the early 70s.

Today fat ewes are worth more than new seasons lambs.

As @kaihoka observes the price of food has always been cyclable - up and down.

 

But today we face a single dominant buyer - China. They have always used their market clout to dominate the market and the price they pay.

 

@Jamesc if no one even the local householder does not wish to buy your honey, we have a market acceptance problem in Canterbury and perhaps the rest of NZ.

 

For sure Don.... we are working on the problem and in the final stages of raising some venture capital to allow us tomove foreward.

The new year is full of promise...😃

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I think the reality is the tough times are here to stay for more than a few years.

If you produce mono Manuka you will be better off than those that aren’t but even mono is not sold as easily or for as much as before the standard came out.

 

Many people came into the industry during the boom when any kind of honey was worth good money. Now that honey is unsaleable or if desperate you might be lucky to get someone to buy it for a few dollars a kilo.

 

Theres three options

find mono Manuka sites, 
try and sell hives and gear and get another job 

hold on and hope for $8kg honey sometime in the future or go broke trying.

 

i don’t see option 3 as viable because I don’t see 8kg for Bush honey even monofloral Bush honeys anytime in the near future.

 

I always feel like a negative Nancy when I post like this but I just can’t see any kind of future for anyone producing non Manuka 

 

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I think the people that came on in the boom could face trouble, particularly if they have major debt.  Those prior to the boom have had a chance to diversify.  Varroa was an example of forcing beekeepers to diversity to create alternative income and cut costs, and some of these people who diversified within the industry then will be fine, as those who have a mortgage free roof over their heads.    Maybe we will see, once again, boutique honeys appearing e.g. a friend has a really good crop of fuchsia!  These boutique honeys seemed to have disappeared over the last few years. 

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Nz  clover honey $7.50 , 500 grams

on aussie supermarket shelves .

Pure deliciousness.  Given up trying to find a nice floral tasting aussie honey. 

It's like chewing gum leaves. Hats off  to the nz beeks that got there product onto the supermarket shelves. 

 

 

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