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M4tt

Tough times ahead

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7 minutes ago, M4tt said:

This has just been printed in the Farmers Weekly . No improvement in prices it would seem , for some time yet 

http://ow.ly/4axz50xOGuG

https://farmersweekly.co.nz/section/other-sectors/view/sticky-wicket-for-honey-producers

Haha .... where have all these analyst’s bin hiding.... it’s been lean an mean for the last two years.

I hear on the grapevine prices of $2/ kg are on offer for ‘white’ honey.

when I get a spare momment I’m gonna polish up my cowboy boots and go sell honey to the Chinaman.

Aye for sure Paddy!

Now here’s the resl oil of honey sales, deduced from market observations over many years.

It all hinges on the price of a 500 gm pot of non manuka....

Shelf price for 500gm clover priced at 10 bucks.... has generally returned to the producer 10 bucks a kilo.

It has been like that for many, many years.

I await with anticipation to see 500 gm of clover on the shop shelf for 2 bucks.

which is why i guess i am looking at building another store shed.

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I heard this morning that there is about 37,000 tonnes of honey sitting in beekeepers sheds. No wonder people are hurting.

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18 minutes ago, jamesc said:

Haha .... where have all these analyst’s bin hiding.... it’s been lean an mean for the last two years.

I hear on the grapevine prices of $2/ kg are on offer for ‘white’ honey.

when I get a spare momment I’m gonna polish up my cowboy boots and go sell honey to the Chinaman.

Aye for sure Paddy!

Now here’s the resl oil of honey sales, deduced from market observations over many years.

It all hinges on the price of a 500 gm pot of non manuka....

Shelf price for 500gm clover priced at 10 bucks.... has generally returned to the producer 10 bucks a kilo.

It has been like that for many, many years.

I await with anticipation to see 500 gm of clover on the shop shelf for 2 bucks.

which is why i guess i am looking at building another store shed.

In the meantime....  I found some nice larva for grafting this evening

CD79FEFD-6845-4193-BCEC-7FA33AAF1208.jpeg

8 minutes ago, Bighands said:

I heard this morning that there is about 37,000 tonnes of honey sitting in beekeepers sheds. No wonder people are hurting.

No shortage of supply then for the soon to be Co-op..... eh.

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2 hours ago, jamesc said:

In the meantime....  I found some nice larva for grafting this evening

CD79FEFD-6845-4193-BCEC-7FA33AAF1208.jpeg

 


perfect !

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From the article "Beekeeping Incorporated president Jane Lorimer says beekeepers can expect a tough couple of seasons ahead".

 

That is a wildly optimistic view. Hard times will stretch well beyond the next couple of seasons.

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1 minute ago, Alastair said:

From the article "Beekeeping Incorporated president Jane Lorimer says beekeepers can expect a tough couple of seasons ahead".

 

That is a wildly optimistic view. Hard times will stretch well beyond the next couple of seasons.

For sure. The bulk honey industry has had it.

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39 minutes ago, yesbut said:

For sure. The bulk honey industry has had it.

If the bulk honey industry has had it what would you do?

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Therein the conundrum. Myself, and a few others i am sure, been trying to think of a plan B, but as yet do not have one.

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Posted (edited)

It seems the honey industry might be as screwed over as the wool. With the insatiable taste for sweet and sugar being seen as a devil honey should be a rising star, especially raw honey with enzyme &  good bacterias intact.  Wool should be the same rising star with plastic clothing but somehow we lack a insightful leader and the marketing focus. It seems the government are happy to give millions to researchers for which most work has been done many times. On ground level there are many ideas lacking the $$ & expertise to get to the market place. I really believe its time we partnered with other ag businesses such as fonterra, alliance group to get access to markets they already have. Market access is the hardest point but with relationships already in place it becomes cheap and efficient. 

Edited by Anne
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Well said Anne. 

 

Me, I think a big part of the problem is us beekeepers ourselves. We are too fractious to ever work together to achieve anything. It has been that way all my life.

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Posted (edited)
51 minutes ago, Bighands said:

If the bulk honey industry has had it what would you do?

We all start packing our own to sell and compete, road nowhere. 

14 hours ago, Bighands said:

I heard this morning that there is about 37,000 tonnes of honey sitting in beekeepers sheds. No wonder people are hurting.

That's million drums. Sounds wrong. 

Or a drum per hive.

Edited by Gino de Graaf

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26 minutes ago, Gino de Graaf said:

We all start packing our own to sell and compete, road nowhere. 

That's million drums. Sounds wrong. 

Or a drum per hive.

I am not talking about this but the last two seasons.So a lot of beeks are waiting.

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1 hour ago, Alastair said:

Well said Anne. 

 

Me, I think a big part of the problem is us beekeepers ourselves. We are too fractious to ever work together to achieve anything. It has been that way all my life.

Yes

Writing a post for all the world bagging Manuka like you did recently is a case in point.
 

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Rubbish

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Posted (edited)

 Man made synthetic products are now all the rage . We all know this , and all rural type  businesses are being oppressed in one way or another, and those that aren’t have either beaten the game for now , or are about to follow. 
I don’t have any wise answers ,   but if the world doesn’t value and want your product, it’s end game for that industry. 
For example , since 2004 , 94000 dairy farms in the USA have ceased to exist 

Edited by M4tt
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E374A214-2F9F-4C53-9407-98597024C770.jpeg

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Posted (edited)
1 minute ago, jamesc said:

E374A214-2F9F-4C53-9407-98597024C770.jpeg

Is that yours ?

Edited by M4tt
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Ah.... whatever.....we is all laughing today!

3EA05823-80A7-4820-A661-49A597B97874.jpeg

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10 minutes ago, jamesc said:

Ah.... whatever.....we is all laughing today!

3EA05823-80A7-4820-A661-49A597B97874.jpeg

Sure you not killing da hives,? Lol. 

12 minutes ago, jamesc said:

E374A214-2F9F-4C53-9407-98597024C770.jpeg

CBD oil is going to be the next drug. No highs but pain relief plus many other benefits. All controlled by big money. Not derived from hemp seeds, but bud and leaf. Illegal here unless prescription. 

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9 minutes ago, M4tt said:

 Man made synthetic products are now all the rage . We all know this , and all rural type  businesses are being oppressed in one way or another, and those that aren’t have either beaten the game for now , or are about to follow. 

 

This is a very good point.

 

Synthetic fibres are a bi product of the petro chemical industry. They have now been shown to break down in washing machines into micro plastics that eventually end up in the ocean, and kill the small creatures at the bottom of the food chain. leading to possible eventual collapse of entire ecosystems. Natural fibres such as wool do not do this.

 

Yet at the same time we have Greenpeace bombing me with advertisements saying this is the generation that ends oil. While they are dressed in their synthetic clothes.

 

We have climate change activists doing the same, and oh by the way, this generation is putting the heaviest burden on the environment per person, than any previous generation. I will take some responsibility though, in that us older folks produced this generation and gave them their values.

 

And then of course, the animal rights activists. Who want to ban sheep farming. So what do they propose, more synthetics?

 

 

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1 hour ago, Bighands said:

I am not talking about this but the last two seasons.So a lot of beeks are waiting.

Still R, it's a lot. If it's anywhere true, we truly f'd.

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2 minutes ago, Gino de Graaf said:

Still R, it's a lot. If it's anywhere true, we truly f'd.

It’s a lot . Estimations in stored tonnage isn’t important . It’s a lot.

 

So we are at the point where another seasons harvest is due to come off . Do we spend money to add to the mountain or not . 
 

Ive seen no positive signs from the market .

 

If you leave the honey on the hives it adds difficulties to management to. 
 

My honey from two seasons ago has disappeared irretrievably into the abyss . I had a really good arrangement where my extractor bought it off me and  on sold it . That arrangement became unsustainable when it was not saleable .

 

I had ideas of getting it extracted and selling privately, but that’s helpful to no one so I’m not going to . Thankfully this is the worst honey season ever for me and my bees will consume it .(Because of the weather. I’m sure other Waikato beeks are the same ). 
 

I will get out of my comfort zone ( around 50 hives last year down to 20 something this year ) and do the country a favour by again reducing numbers and stacking more empty gear up in my shed .

 

Beekeeping is part of my business but it is certainly not financially viable anymore . 
 

I really feel for you guys and girls that are very good at what you do 

 

 

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2 minutes ago, M4tt said:

It’s a lot . Estimations in stored tonnage isn’t important . It’s a lot.

 

So we are at the point where another seasons harvest is due to come off . Do we spend money to add to the mountain or not . 
 

Ive seen no positive signs from the market .

 

If you leave the honey on the hives it adds difficulties to management to. 
 

My honey from two seasons ago has disappeared irretrievably into the abyss . I had a really good arrangement where my extractor bought it off me and  on sold it . That arrangement became unsustainable when it was not saleable .

 

I had ideas of getting it extracted and selling privately, but that’s helpful to no one so I’m not going to . Thankfully this is the worst honey season ever for me and my bees will consume it .(Because of the weather. I’m sure other Waikato beeks are the same ). 
 

I will get out of my comfort zone ( around 50 hives last year down to 20 something this year ) and do the country a favour by again reducing numbers and stacking more empty gear up in my shed .

 

Beekeeping is part of my business but it is certainly not financially viable anymore . 
 

I really feel for you guys and girls that are very good at what you do 

 

 

The current sw winds are not helping. The cost to extract versus not selling it ...  I don't think we will get much surplus. Which weirdly is a good thing...

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Was only a few months back I mentioned leaving multi/bush honey on the hives and I got told I was in the wrong industry.  It now seems leaving some of it on, if not all, is getting a consensus.

 

Just out of some hives and I still have green nectar coming in here....

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