Jump to content
Alastair

What Could he Get for UMF 15

Recommended Posts

Just asking on behalf of a buddy who has around 100 kg's of UMF 15, what it would be worth, i have attached at file with the numbers.

 

.

 

SP.JPG

Edited by Alastair
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Alastair said:

Just asking on behalf of a buddy who has around 100 kg's of UMF 15, what it would be worth, i have attached at file with the numbers.

 

.

 

SP.JPG

Small problem , the NPA is only 6.7 which is equal to UMF won’t get to 15 .

was offered $38 last week for a mono 11.6 .

Have no clue what a mono 5 is worth 

  • Good Info 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

With the ratio of  MGO to DHA I would have thought the growth potential would be quite good ?

But I know stuff all about it So wonder why I’m even putting my oar in :) 

  • Agree 1
  • Haha 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
26 minutes ago, frazzledfozzle said:

@Rob Atkinson is $38 for mono 11 a fair price ?

Not sure , priced as a 10+ with room for the best before date .I’m taking it .

was told by a mate who still has about 1/3 of last years crop to sell, (  has only recently sold the rest in last few months and was getting concerned ) that I should expect somewhere from $35 -$40 .

As far as I can see the market is very soft ( packers running down stock?) 

 

  • Good Info 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
51 minutes ago, Rob Atkinson said:

Not sure , priced as a 10+ with room for the best before date .I’m taking it .

was told by a mate who still has about 1/3 of last years crop to sell, (  has only recently sold the rest in last few months and was getting concerned ) that I should expect somewhere from $35 -$40 .

As far as I can see the market is very soft ( packers running down stock?) 

 

If beeks are struggling to sell their manuka at $38 why couldnt they drop their price to $20.

They would still be a lot better off than beeks who are selling at $6.

Does manuka have to be such a high price to make it economic because the crops are normally so pitiful.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
48 minutes ago, kaihoka said:

If beeks are struggling to sell their manuka at $38 why couldnt they drop their price to $20.

They would still be a lot better off than beeks who are selling at $6.

Does manuka have to be such a high price to make it economic because the crops are normally so pitiful.

Not everyone has serious pressure on their boundaries from other beeks kaihoka.. specially down here in the south, however the honey test isn’t as strong. 

That batch of Allistar’s buddy should grow to 15+ with DHA that high. 

MGO and DHA are used to forecast the growth. 

That is as long as this test was taken at harvest and not after storage where it may have already grown. 

  • Good Info 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Rob Atkinson said:

Not sure , priced as a 10+ with room for the best before date .I’m taking it .

was told by a mate who still has about 1/3 of last years crop to sell, (  has only recently sold the rest in last few months and was getting concerned ) that I should expect somewhere from $35 -$40 .

As far as I can see the market is very soft ( packers running down stock?) 

 

Or just piss all world demand for above 10 umf

So if you think about it, running down stock....

Right now must be at lowest inventory? Before new season. And last two seasons poor Manuka yields.  

@Alastair did your buddy approach any buyers yet? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, kaihoka said:

If beeks are struggling to sell their manuka at $38 why couldnt they drop their price to $20.

They would still be a lot better off than beeks who are selling at $6.

Does manuka have to be such a high price to make it economic because the crops are normally so pitiful.

 you tend to get less Honey from a hive in Manuka than other sources. So need more $$ per kilo to be economic. 

 

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, nikki watts said:

 you tend to get less Honey from a hive in Manuka than other sources. So need more $$ per kilo to be economic. 

 

 

Thats what I thought .

You never really hear about  3 or 4 supers on a hive full of manuka honey .

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 minutes ago, kaihoka said:

Thats what I thought .

You never really hear about  3 or 4 supers on a hive full of manuka honey .

You’re right !!!

No one would talk about THAT spot. 

😎😎😎🤑🤑🤑

  • Haha 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Gino de Graaf said:

 

@Alastair did your buddy approach any buyers yet? 

 

Yes he did, but was not happy with the price offered. It was more than the $38 mentioned here for UMF 11, but as has been mentioned this honey should make UMF 15. Yes, the honey has just been harvested, these numbers are straight off the hive.

 

His situation is that he has spent the last several years planting his land in manuka of a selected strain, and is finally reaping some honey. However his investment has been substantial, he is now looking for best possible price.

  • Good Info 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
41 minutes ago, Alastair said:

His situation is that he has spent the last several years planting his land in manuka of a selected strain, and is finally reaping some honey. However his investment has been substantial, he is now looking for best possible price.

i had been under the impression, not sure where from, that small lots of under a drum would be hard to shift wholesale, have I got that horribly wrong somewhere along the way?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, tommy dave said:

i had been under the impression, not sure where from, that small lots of under a drum would be hard to shift wholesale, have I got that horribly wrong somewhere along the way?

afaik thats quite correct.

with a measly 100kg many can't be bothered dealing with them. even guys with drums for sale are having a hard time shifting them.

the other issues are of course all the paper work, where its stored and shipping cost.

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A lot of the sites we had on the Coromandel Peninsula  would regularly do 3 to 4 heavy full depth boxes of manuka. Not every year but most years. All the people that think overcrowding doesn't make any difference to crops are living in a dream world.

  • Agree 1
  • Good Info 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
24 minutes ago, john berry said:

A lot of the sites we had on the Coromandel Peninsula  would regularly do 3 to 4 heavy full depth boxes of manuka. Not every year but most years. All the people that think overcrowding doesn't make any difference to crops are living in a dream world.

I suppose when that was happening manuka honey was not worth much .

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Funny old world ..... we pulled bees out of manuka the last couple of days to go into pollination . Who would have thought !

Edited by jamesc
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
47 minutes ago, john berry said:

A lot of the sites we had on the Coromandel Peninsula  would regularly do 3 to 4 heavy full depth boxes of manuka. Not every year but most years. All the people that think overcrowding doesn't make any difference to crops are living in a dream world.

 

With you there John, in my younger pre manuka boom days in the far north we would certainly harvest 2 solid boxes of manuka sometimes more per hive. Now in the same area, guys are happy with 1/2 a box.

  • Agree 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, tristan said:

afaik thats quite correct.

with a measly 100kg many can't be bothered dealing with them. even guys with drums for sale are having a hard time shifting them.

the other issues are of course all the paper work, where its stored and shipping cost.

but sounds like @Alastair's mate was able to find a buyer for 100kg.. guess that discussion might be better offline

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Alastair said:

 

With you there John, in my younger pre manuka boom days in the far north we would certainly harvest 2 solid boxes of manuka sometimes more per hive. Now in the same area, guys are happy with 1/2 a box.

Is there as much manuka around now as then .

Has it been overgrown by other bush ?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes both of those are true Kaihoka, I was in the area 2 years ago and spent about 1/2 a day driving around some old haunts, rather sad actually things have changed a lot.

 

But there is still enough manuka to provide a decent crop. But when i was working bees there we were the only beekeeper in the area other than a few hobbyists, and one guy with around 80 hives. Now, there are more beekeepers than you can shake a stick at and i think that is the big difference.

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, Alastair said:

Now, there are more beekeepers than you can shake a stick at and i think that is the big difference.

 

for sure. even one of old sites where we even had a season where they nearly starved to death in the "main flow" when there was only 3 beeks in the aera. now at the last count its over 20.

 

 

  • Agree 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
22 hours ago, tristan said:

afaik thats quite correct.

with a measly 100kg many can't be bothered dealing with them. even guys with drums for sale are having a hard time shifting them.

the other issues are of course all the paper work, where its stored and shipping cost.

Unfortunately this is the reality. We buy many many tonnes of Manuka each month and are always looking for more if good quality and priced competitively. The difficulty with 100kg is that it is not worth the time, effort, paperwork and testing cost. Proportionately each kg becomes more expensive. $35/36 may work for 10+ but would need to be in the tonnes quantity. 

 

 

 

 

  • Good Info 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...