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New neighbour complaining about my apiary


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If people want to live in the country they should accept that livestock and the noises and messes they make are part of the deal. They should go back to town. 

The NZ land mass is actually bigger by quite a bit and if you compare population numbers, 66 million for the UK, then NZ is by far the more inviting place to live and someone mentioned nationalities t

And it will continue as long as we have unbridled population increase in the name of the economy.  Don't blame them, blame all the people who want to earn more than $40 K pa, have a new car every thre

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8 hours ago, yesbut said:

 

And it will continue as long as we have unbridled population increase in the name of the economy.  Don't blame them, blame all the people who want to earn more than $40 K pa, have a new car every three years, a house that's really a castle, overseas trips blah.....

 

if whinging made any money some people here would be earning 400k a month.

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6 hours ago, ChrisM said:

how many people actually live in your town?

Is this an anti-catholic nod to contraception? 

migration figures do not seem that extreme if you consider what the statistics people have recorded.

However, I do agree completely about a 'consumer society' and the waste of energy and resources.

 

image.thumb.png.2888d74e902aa02e0300d1f0acd7f4da.png

net.... and how that's calculated... ask how many "new zealanders" were born in nz - about 30% were not...

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I was talking to a farmer about this topic a few days ago . He used to have two neighbours . Now he has close to fifty , so that impacts on what he can and can’t do . The reality of the situation is that even if you willingly shift your hives / change your practices to move with the times , in a short time you will be shifting them again or adapting to new rules and

regulations . That is the single biggest factor I find with farmers selling up . They get worn down by all the paperwork . Quite ironic when a 12 hr day is normal for a lot of them ! 

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3 hours ago, Sailabee said:

According to Dr Google, the 2013 census showed that 39.1% of Auckland City's population were born overseas.

I was born in Auckland but I had left before 2013.

The NZ population has doubled since 1960, mostly they all go to Auckland, but that is over 60 years.

Compared to the UK that has similar land area this isn't that bad. However, maybe we should call it the Un-united Kingdom.

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1 hour ago, AndrewNZ said:

 

The NZ land mass is actually bigger by quite a bit and if you compare population numbers, 66 million for the UK, then NZ is by far the more inviting place to live and someone mentioned nationalities the UK is very diverse with heritage from all over Europe I think you would struggle to find a genuine Anglo Saxon and this follows into NZ as the majority of European Kiwi's have heritage from the UK. As for me! I'm a Kiwi by choice, I chose to live here for the Kiwi way of life and I chose to comply with all the regulations to become a citizen hence a Kiwi by choice.

 

I never kept bees in the UK but do here I too had a neighbour complain that "I have been stung by one of your bees" she wanted me to move my two hives and was not interested in why it was not that easy. She complained to the Tasman council who rang me and as I comply with the regulations of no more than two hives for an urban residence, the hives had been inspected and were registered there was nothing my neighbour could do. It also helped that the council official is a bee keeper!

there's been a hell of a lot of english people move into to the tasman area.

 

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Thank you all for your thoughts. Much appreciated. 
I came to a hand shake agreement that I will move my hives over period of one to 2 months max., after I do my harvesting and boxes get lighter again.
Now, I am planning to move my hives 80-90m further down the hill away from the sight, below the steep banks and behind 20m tall trees. However in bees eyes this is only a few wing flaps away and I need to plan how to move the hives so close away from its original position. 
Back in Serbia, where I am from I heard that you can actually move the hives without taking them 2km away for 3 weeks by closing their entrance with 10 sheets of newspaper. You prick a little hole (0.5mm) through the paper to encourage the bees to chew their way out. After couple of days they make it through a little stressed and will start re-mapping the new area without going back to the original place.
Has anyone in NZ got an experience on moving the hives close distance successfully.
Thank you all for your participation so far... :D 

Edited by Nedeljko
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What I have done to move several hives a short distance is.

1. Decide which is the weakest hive.

2. Put and extra box on the weak hive (as it will stay in position)

3. Move all the other hives (leave the weak one) to the new position.

4. All field bees will go back to the weak hive (that's why the extra box)

5. Leave for a time (1 month or so.) (most of those extra field bees will have died off) then move the last hive to the new location.

 

I hope this is helpful

 

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Thanks Trevor,
I have 11 strong hives and one weak hive. I imagine there would be a lot of foragers coming to that weak hive. 
Those 11 will stay without a forager for couple of weeks until the new ones come.
I was thinking to experiment with 2 hives and try the method with a newspaper and leave a nucleus box at the old position in case foragers go back.
Thanks

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5 minutes ago, Nedeljko said:

Thanks Trevor,
I have 11 strong hives and one weak hive. I imagine there would be a lot of foragers coming to that weak hive. 
Those 11 will stay without a forager for couple of weeks until the new ones come.
I was thinking to experiment with 2 hives and try the method with a newspaper and leave a nucleus box at the old position in case foragers go back.
Thanks

The next option is to move the 2 strongest hives at a time.  Leave a couple of weeks between moves.

The bees will produce new field bees almost straight away.

 

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Another option. If you have a friend with a lifestyle block several km away, put the hives on a trailer, leaves hives on trailer at friends for seven days, then take to new site.  If the trailer doesn't hold all you hives, shift them in two shifts.  Shift them when the bees aren't flying and you don't need to block entrances.  Just don't stop at petrol stations and shops!

If the hives are balanced on the trailer properly (consider centre of gravity), you should be able to disconnect from vehicle and put blocks under the tow bar, and of course a block under each wheel to stop movement. 

You need to ask yourself, why you have got one weak hive?  If you don't know the answer, don't amalgamate with the others - a great way to spread AFB

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9 minutes ago, Maggie James said:

 

Another option. If you have a friend with a lifestyle block several km away, put the hives on a trailer, leaves hives on trailer at friends for seven days, then take to new site.  If the trailer doesn't hold all you hives, shift them in two shifts.  Shift them when the bees aren't flying and you don't need to block entrances.  Just don't stop at petrol stations and shops!

If the hives are balanced on the trailer properly (consider centre of gravity), you should be able to disconnect from vehicle and put blocks under the tow bar, and of course a block under each wheel to stop movement. 

You need to ask yourself, why you have got one weak hive?  If you don't know the answer, don't amalgamate with the others - a great way to spread AFB

Thanks Maggie,
One weak hive I have is because it was in a nucleus over winter and I introduced a new queen cell in November. It was examined by me and an AFB officer and we didn't find any AFB. I am a DECA holder and make sure I inspect any suspicious hives. Good question and thank you for your observation. 

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1 hour ago, Nedeljko said:

It was examined by me and an AFB officer and we didn't find any AFB. I am a DECA holder and make sure I inspect any suspicious hives. Good question and thank you for your observation. 

Speaking of which I've had two more email notifications this week about AFB within 2km. Ggrrrrrrrr.

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Blocking hives in with newspaper  especially in summer is a very high-risk operation. Even with ventilated floors you can still kill them if it gets hot enough. Personally I would go with the  move them away and then move them back idea although even after three weeks  a few bees will end up going back to the old site.

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12 hours ago, ChrisM said:

 

Compared to the UK that has similar land area.

 

There is a website called thetruesize.com that allows you to compare countries with each other side by side, and allows for the distortions caused by the maps we use. NZ is waaay bigger. Its fun to play with.

truesize.JPG

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53 minutes ago, Markypoo said:

There is a website called thetruesize.com that allows you to compare countries with each other side by side, and allows for the distortions caused by the maps we use. NZ is waaay bigger. Its fun to play with.

truesize.JPG

True but that only emphasizes the point being made 

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On 18/12/2019 at 12:50 PM, Nedeljko said:

Thank you all for your thoughts. Much appreciated. 
I came to a hand shake agreement that I will move my hives over period of one to 2 months max., after I do my harvesting and boxes get lighter again.
Now, I am planning to move my hives 80-90m further down the hill away from the sight, below the steep banks and behind 20m tall trees. However in bees eyes this is only a few wing flaps away and I need to plan how to move the hives so close away from its original position. 
Back in Serbia, where I am from I heard that you can actually move the hives without taking them 2km away for 3 weeks by closing their entrance with 10 sheets of newspaper. You prick a little hole (0.5mm) through the paper to encourage the bees to chew their way out. After couple of days they make it through a little stressed and will start re-mapping the new area without going back to the original place.
Has anyone in NZ got an experience on moving the hives close distance successfully.
Thank you all for your participation so far... :D 

I had to move my hive from one corner of my back yard to the other far corner- about 30 m away.

My hive is a long hive up on a stand, so I needed help.

 

The night before, I closed off the entrance. I had to go to work and was back by mid afternoon,

A neighbour helped me move it. Interestingly, there were at least a dozen bees outside, feeding nectar through the screen, so they Dont always go home every night.

 

After we moved it, what i did was put alot of thin branches across the entrance as well as cover the whole thing with shade clothe to make it as difficult as possible for them to get out- so they would KNOW things had changed and would re-orientate. Entrance was closed down to the smallest i could do.

 

I left it that way for about a week, maybe a bit more then removed the shade clothe leaving the branches and twigs.

When I checked the bait box I had placed at the original spot the first morning after the move (5am before work), there were only a handful of bees in it. This got put directly under the hive. I checked the original spot as well- with a torch cos it was still dark and there were a few small clusters of bees on the concrete.

 

The next few days, still some bees went back and in the evening there would be a billow of bees circling around til they all found the hive and went to their new home.. They were really loud while this was going on. Noisy!!!

Each day there would be less and less at the old site. They always found there way back to the hive with none there in the early morning, except for the first day.

So, you can move a hive even if it is close by. You just have to make sure they have to work at getting out and have to re-orientate on the entrance.

They did really well over the rest of summer and over wintered really well.

This spring they got split for the first time and both hives are doing well.

 

Good luck with your move.

 

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  • 2 weeks later...

My main apiary is about 600 metres from my home. I keep just a few hives at home - mainly due to bee poo issues and the danger of death if my wife continued to be unable to hang the washing outdoors!  If I need to move colonies from one site to the other I move them around 3 miles away (to where I work) for a couple of weeks first.

The poo issue tends to come in waves - depending on the forage available and the time of year - for me it's spring that's the worst time.

If the odd colony needs to be split due to swarming, or a swarm could be hived elsewhere, that could be an opportunity to start to move of some colonies - any reduction in numbers would show willing and appease the neighbours before the big move.

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