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Advocate airborne take on honey situation


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I’m really enjoying the advocate it’s had really interesting no BS articles that calls it how it is which is very different from the light and fluffy media releases coming from APINZ that talks of 25%

But in fairness, they introduced their pollen count method before manuka was a thing. They were groundbreaking at the time, introducing a standardised method to correctly identify honey types by the p

Anyone for Radish?

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2 hours ago, yesbut said:

In that case they're an endangered species !    Nothofagus don't exist anymore...

http://blog.naturespic.com/tag/nothofagus-changes-to-fuscospora-and-lophozonia

Ha well that shows how long it has been since I was last at a forestry convention!   I suppose that like kanuka was re-classified as kunzea ericoides ... as do other species over time as more data comes to the fore. 

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1 hour ago, Chrisdub said:

Ha well that shows how long it has been since I was last at a forestry convention!   I suppose that like kanuka was re-classified as kunzea ericoides ... as do other species over time as more data comes to the fore. 

People can get very pedantic over nomenclature .

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  • 2 weeks later...
On 26/12/2019 at 7:49 AM, dansar said:

Analytica offer pollen count testing, although they don’t identify every pollen that is in a sample. High percentage of unidentified pollens in our samples last season. I think that comes down to the lab technician building up a library of samples to recognise.

 

We've currently got 20+ of the most common floral types in our library so hopefully if there was something of interest in your honey we would have found it! Usually the 'unknown' is made up of non-nectar bearing plants or obscure floral types. We're constantly building up our library so if you ever suspect there is something in particular in the honey or know what plant types are in the bees' foraging area we can certainly have a go at identifying these pollen types/adding them to our pollen library. 

 

On 27/12/2019 at 10:58 AM, Oma said:

Thanks for your responses will try Analytica. Would be interesting to see what is being collected around here. I don’t have volume of just one thing but have planted a few plots of Phacelia and thyme and would love to know if they have influenced the flavour of my honey.

 

I don't think we have phacelia in our identifiable list at the moment so if you haven't already sent in your honey I'd suggest you write "suspect thyme and phacelia" in the Comments section of the request form. If we've already got your sample here, I'll let our pollen team know so they can have a crack at identifying phacelia. Never a dull moment in the pollen testing area with all the variability!

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45 minutes ago, Kate R said:

 

I don't think we have phacelia in our identifiable list at the moment so if you haven't already sent in your honey I'd suggest you write "suspect thyme and phacelia" in the Comments section of the request form. If we've already got your sample here, I'll let our pollen team know so they can have a crack at identifying phacelia. Never a dull moment in the pollen testing area with all the variability!

 

Thanks @Kate R the sample is still sitting next to the computer waiting till I have tutu samples to send.  Would it help if I sent in a couple of Phacelia flowers?

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2 hours ago, Oma said:

 

Thanks @Kate R the sample is still sitting next to the computer waiting till I have tutu samples to send.  Would it help if I sent in a couple of Phacelia flowers?

 

Yes please, that would be great. If you could please put them in a zip-lock bag or something to contain them that helps us keep the pollen grains from contaminating our lab spaces. 

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On 6/01/2020 at 10:02 AM, Kate R said:

 

We've currently got 20+ of the most common floral types in our library so hopefully if there was something of interest in your honey we would have found it! Usually the 'unknown' is made up of non-nectar bearing plants or obscure floral types. We're constantly building up our library so if you ever suspect there is something in particular in the honey or know what plant types are in the bees' foraging area we can certainly have a go at identifying these pollen types/adding them to our pollen library. 

 

 

I don't think we have phacelia in our identifiable list at the moment so if you haven't already sent in your honey I'd suggest you write "suspect thyme and phacelia" in the Comments section of the request form. If we've already got your sample here, I'll let our pollen team know so they can have a crack at identifying phacelia. Never a dull moment in the pollen testing area with all the variability!

Phacelia and thyme pollen are very distinguishable.  Thyme pollen is much larger 

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9 hours ago, Oma said:

 

Well who would have thought pollen samples have come back nearly 80% kamahi 4% gorse  3% willow the rest unidentifiable.

I’m a convert for Kamahi it sure is tasty.  My bees are travelling further afield than I realised. Pollen counting adds another dimension to beekeeping.

Keen to know what area in Turangi your hives are in? I lived there for yrs and an still have a mate there with couple hundred hives.

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My hives back on to the biggest freshwater wetland in New Zealand at the base of lake Taupo, so further down the road from us the flood plane prevents hive placements. There is major work being undertaken to restore the wetland to native flora and fauna, they are making great progress but there is a long way to go.  The giant willow aphid is totally absent this year but their sap sucking ways have been taken over by a plague of passion vine hoppers 🥺 As I harvest one box of honey at a time I have a large variation in types and tastes and it costs a small fortune in tutin tests.

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On 8/04/2020 at 11:12 PM, Oma said:

 

Well who would have thought pollen samples have come back nearly 80% kamahi 4% gorse  3% willow the rest unidentifiable.

I’m a convert for Kamahi it sure is tasty.  My bees are travelling further afield than I realised. Pollen counting adds another dimension to beekeeping.

Interesting isn't it, I could have sworn my bees were making the most of the Linden trees and Phacelia here and my pollen test came back with 52% clover 26% kanuka 11% trefoil and 11% other ??.  I think I will sample the honey throughout the season rather than wait until the end and just see how it varies.  It is much easier as a hobbyist.

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i wonder how much pollen content of different honeys skews the readings.

honey dew has no pollen at all.

rata does not have much.

phacelia maybe the 11% other.

do you know much about linden trees ?

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12 minutes ago, kaihoka said:

i wonder how much pollen content of different honeys skews the readings.

honey dew has no pollen at all.

rata does not have much.

phacelia maybe the 11% other.

do you know much about linden trees ?

Beech dew has characteristics that other honeys don't have, including black sooty mould exhibiting on microscopy.  Colour, taste and texture are taken into consideration.  Beech dew also has other characteristics.  See the Airborne website https://www.airborne.co.nz/pages/honey-dew

 

See this link for defining characteristics of rata https://www.airborne.co.nz/pages/rata

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19 minutes ago, Maggie James said:

Beech dew has characteristics that other honeys don't have, including black sooty mould exhibiting on microscopy.  Colour, taste and texture are taken into consideration.  Beech dew also has other characteristics.  See the Airborne website https://www.airborne.co.nz/pages/honey-dew

 

See this link for defining characteristics of rata https://www.airborne.co.nz/pages/rata

       
       
       
       
       

 

 

 

 

Pollen Type

%

 

Total

Rata or Pohutakawa (similar)

 

 

46%

Brassica

 

 

24%

Mahoe

 

 

14%

Assorted unknown

 

 

16%

 

 

 

 

this is my pollen report for 3 seasons ago.

i have a large jar of honey from then i have just opened .

it is still as liquid as honey dew, no sign of crystallization.

it will be mostly all northern rata.

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4 hours ago, kaihoka said:

i wonder how much pollen content of different honeys skews the readings.

honey dew has no pollen at all.

rata does not have much.

phacelia maybe the 11% other.

do you know much about linden trees ?

The reason Rata does not have a great representation of pollen is the stigma and stamen are too far apart so the bee does not have much pollen in the Rata netcar being bought back. Also it depends where your honey boxes have been. If you put honey boxes that have been on Kamahi then of course you are going to get Kamahi in the pollen test you send away even though there is no Kamahi flowering

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5 hours ago, Bighands said:

The reason Rata does not have a great representation of pollen is the stigma and stamen are too far apart so the bee does not have much pollen in the Rata netcar being bought back. Also it depends where your honey boxes have been. If you put honey boxes that have been on Kamahi then of course you are going to get Kamahi in the pollen test you send away even though there is no Kamahi flowering

If Glassons Rata was ever available in ChCh shops we always bought it.  My grandaddy for quite a few years was mine engineer at Blackball Coal, so my parents were Glassons' stalwarts.  The Rata honey came in a white waxed 1 lb cardboard container with stylistic red flowers, and such a white delicious honey.  

 

Kamahi and manuka honey unheard of those days.  

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On 11/04/2020 at 9:30 AM, kaihoka said:

i wonder how much pollen content of different honeys skews the readings.

honey dew has no pollen at all.

rata does not have much.

phacelia maybe the 11% other.

do you know much about linden trees ?


I know our pollen guy had a formula that allowed for pollens coming from both under represented and over represented sources.

He also did a conductivity test to see how much honeydew was in the honey.

The higher the conductivity the more honeydew content .

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1 hour ago, frazzledfozzle said:


I know our pollen guy had a formula that allowed for pollens coming from both under represented and over represented sources.

He also did a conductivity test to see how much honeydew was in the honey.

The higher the conductivity the more honeydew content .

Would it also factor in those flowers which bees use for pollen only and not nectar I wonder?

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43 minutes ago, Sailabee said:

Would it also factor in those flowers which bees use for pollen only and not nectar I wonder?


If it’s from flowers that are used only for pollen gathering it will generally be stored in the brood box not the honey box.

Also it is very unlikely to be a dominant source in the pollen count of a honey sample. 

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On 11/04/2020 at 9:30 AM, kaihoka said:

i wonder how much pollen content of different honeys skews the readings.

honey dew has no pollen at all.

rata does not have much.

phacelia maybe the 11% other.

do you know much about linden trees ?

We have five Linden trees on our 2.5 acres, one of them is massive and was probably planted by the family who settled here in the 1850's that's about 100m from my hives the others are about 20m.  They spend their time on the big one 100m away which flowers generally late November early December and has a scent that fills the whole of our back garden.  I think there are a couple of varieties and are called Tillia.   The Americans call it the Basswood tree and the story goes that "A. I Root planted a basswood orchard on the outskirts of Medina, Ohio and put his queen rearing operation in the heart of it.  He used the basswood for three things: the trees provided shade during the heat of the summer and when the trees matured, the blossoms provided a nectar source in June and July.  Finally when the trees were of the correct age, they were thinned and the timber provided the special wood needed to make the basswood sections for section comb honey." (Kim Flotum, The Backyard Beekeepers Honey Handbook, p37).  The honey is almost clear but quite tasty with a small after taste.   Photo of one of the girls on the tree out back.

IMG_2077.jpg

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1 hour ago, BJC said:

We have five Linden trees on our 2.5 acres, one of them is massive and was probably planted by the family who settled here in the 1850's that's about 100m from my hives the others are about 20m.  They spend their time on the big one 100m away which flowers generally late November early December and has a scent that fills the whole of our back garden.  I think there are a couple of varieties and are called Tillia.   The Americans call it the Basswood tree and the story goes that "A. I Root planted a basswood orchard on the outskirts of Medina, Ohio and put his queen rearing operation in the heart of it.  He used the basswood for three things: the trees provided shade during the heat of the summer and when the trees matured, the blossoms provided a nectar source in June and July.  Finally when the trees were of the correct age, they were thinned and the timber provided the special wood needed to make the basswood sections for section comb honey." (Kim Flotum, The Backyard Beekeepers Honey Handbook, p37).  The honey is almost clear but quite tasty with a small after taste.   Photo of one of the girls on the tree out back.

IMG_2077.jpg

So you would not know what flavour to look out for if it was in your honey ?

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