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Nuc_man

Advocate airborne take on honey situation

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Well of course, Manuka is the pioneer crop. The weed that pops up after the gold miners have moved on, or the farmer walked off the land.  It is the nurse crop to provide shade and shelter for the next generation of punga  and  canopy of rewrewa, or tawari, or kahakatea , or ......

So as beekeepers we also need to become Manuka farmers ..... rotating blocks like pasture, burning or spraying to ensure that the manuka is always the pioneer crop.

To leave it to it's own devices will  see  a down ward spiral in production of a sought after resource.

 

But of course, we all know that .... right ?

 

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On 4/12/2019 at 12:10 PM, nikki watts said:

% Manuka pollen according to the label

I got an 86% on my manuka pollen count one time 

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58 minutes ago, tommy dave said:

you're forgetting that nobody really believes that meeting the export standard means that the predominant floral source for the nectar is manuka. Not even MPI - they describe it quite carefully in that sense...

almost worth donating to get access to PMs/ unrelated - on a forum i used to moderate (still a mod, but no longer really active) there was a lot of jest about the use of PMS vs PMs given what the acronym stands for ;)

In this case the manuka came from someone who has a business making medicinal products  and a laboratory

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Hives can survive very high mite loads but generally not thrive afterward.
Its probably not the Mites directly that do the lingering damage but more likely the various pathogens that the Mites Vector.
The cleaner the mites the less of these lingering effects there are (Possibly)
I go around my trial Hives and see the ones that are behind and then sure enough there on the lid is their Autumn Mite count numbers. 

There is a strong correlation between poor doer Hives and  Autumn counts of 30+ and of course 30+ might normally be a death sentence for many Autumn Hives 

Edited by Philbee
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On 5/12/2019 at 7:55 PM, Maru Hoani said:

I got an 86% on my manuka pollen count one time 

 

Maru who tests your pollen counts?

 

I want to get a verified kanuka honey I can market as such.

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And on that point, I dont lose Hives over winter that have very High Autumn Mite counts.
They may be behind in the Spring but they are alive and most are full of Bees now.
The worst Spring Hive in my trial (#24) had 68 mites/300 Bees, reduced to 1/ 243 bees for winter and is now 4 frames of Bees with a high Nosema count but it will survive.
 

Edited by Philbee

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12 hours ago, Alastair said:

 

Maru who tests your pollen counts?

 

I want to get a verified kanuka honey I can market as such.

 

Alistair, we have a chemical based kanuka test that  @Jacob can describe in more detail. Basically it uses 3-PLA (found in manuka and kanuka) and leptosperin (found in manuka) to establish if the honey is kanuka or "Other". You'd use the MPI manuka tests to ascertain if the "other" was manuka. Unfortunately as manuka and kanuka pollen looks so similar, most pollen counts will classify this as "manuka/kanuka type" (ours included). To the best of my knowledge GNS are the only lab that will give you a pollen count that differentiates between manuka and kanuka and they'll charge you accordingly. 

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Thanks. There is a lot of kanuka coming into the hives this season i am planning to launch it as a labelled type, I'll be in touch once harvested.

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11 minutes ago, Alastair said:

Thanks. There is a lot of kanuka coming into the hives this season i am planning to launch it as a labelled type, I'll be in touch once harvested.

 How often do you actually see a bee on Kanuka ?  

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Not a lot but i did today.

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5 hours ago, yesbut said:

 How often do you actually see a bee on Kanuka ?  

When it's in bloom and the weather's good😂

6 hours ago, Alastair said:

Thanks. There is a lot of kanuka coming into the hives this season i am planning to launch it as a labelled type, I'll be in touch once harvested.

Hopefully not too much in my manuka this year, I'm only pulling the mainly capped boxes most the second boxes are full except they're not capped and jelly az so I'm just leaving it with an extra super hopefully $5kg+

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Same issue here, I got manuka but it's probably 50% uncapped and I got to take it cos a lot of other stuff starting to come in. The guy who will extract it has set up a de humidifier thing that blows dry air through the boxes prior to extracting, he is confident it will work.

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