Jump to content
Trevor Gillbanks

December 2019 Apiary Diary

Recommended Posts

1 hour ago, tommy dave said:

crap. Turns out the boxes of frames (several hundred) i have stored out of sight vaguely in mind are all full depth. And all the boxes i made up are 3/4 depth. So I put in an order for a few frames with a major supplier. Couple of working days later got an email stating that the gear was packed for consignment and about to be picked up. A couple more days later i got a phone call saying, yeah, about that, we're out of stock. Suspected that an important customer turned up and scooped the kit, but deal is that their boiler failed so they couldn't coat frames for a while. Bit annoying, getting the money refunded and going elsewhere this time. Doesn't matter who it is (we've all made mistakes/had stuff happen), does act as a reminder to call about orders if you care about them turning up within a week or two. I've got some kitset full-depth boxes i think, so looks like i'll be dealing with a little bit of extra weight in a handful of boxes this summer...

 

main note to self though - check kit rather than assume i know what i have on hand, and get organised earlier rather than later!!!

Quite a lot of second hand boxes and frames  on trade  me !

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, john berry said:

Martin's are related to honey Badgers and skunks both of which can destroy hives. Not sure about stoats weasels and ferrets, I have never seen any damage from these but they all eat insects to some extent and I'm sure they would take drones given the chance.

 

They do damage when sneak under car hood - wires, hoses are main target for them. Pretty dangerous.. really crazy animal.. beside it is always blood thirsty.. everything what make move they will try to kill..

  • Sad 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, jamesc said:

Quite a lot of second hand boxes and frames  on trade  me !

terrifying eh

word is there were a bunch found dumped at otaki river mouth today/this week. Likely stolen by someone who then found out there is no market for things worth less than $0

  • Agree 1
  • Haha 1
  • Sad 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, tommy dave said:

terrifying eh

word is there were a bunch found dumped at otaki river mouth today/this week. Likely stolen by someone who then found out there is no market for things worth less than $0

It will be a rough couple of yrs but the problem will not go on for ever .

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, kaihoka said:

It will be a rough couple of yrs but the problem will not go on for ever .

 


love your optimism @kaihoka  :) 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
17 hours ago, tommy dave said:

Likely stolen by someone who then found out there is no market for things worth less than $0

pity they didn't value add and make kindling. That's a win -win  except for the person stolen from.

Maybe at this time of year,- Charcoal......

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, frazzledfozzle said:


love your optimism @kaihoka  :) 

Bee keeping is not some flakey whim like ostrich farming . Its an industry thats literally over 1000yrs old.

All the people who were only in for the money will quickly move on to the next big thing .

Beeks like you who are obviously highly skilled and into bees cause you  have an interest in them will I think survive .

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, kaihoka said:

Bee keeping is not some flakey whim like ostrich farming . Its an industry thats literally over 1000yrs old.

All the people who were only in for the money will quickly move on to the next big thing .


it’s difficult for me to see what the future is for commercial beekeeping in NZ.

 

Obviously we won’t be getting the high prices for our Bush honeys that we have recently but where will the price settle and where will the demand come from.

Will we be able to still make a living from honey or will we go back to working a second job.

The Manuka areas are becoming even more crowded than before with more beekeepers trying to keep their businesses afloat.

 

i know beekeeping itself will keep going but what will the face of commercial beekeeping look like and who will be a part of it.

 

 

 

  • Like 3
  • Sad 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My Old Man was a seafarer.  He first went to sea in a time when they learnt the Rules of the Sea by rote , and was always quoting lines of verse when home life got a bit dodgy ....

"If in danger or in doubt, always keep a sharp lookout ....." 

But the one I liked most was   " If the wind's before the rain, then you may set sail again. But if the rain's before the wind, then your sail's and halyards mend ."

 

It's been blowing a gale here for days ..... hot and dry Nor'west  that sucks the moisture out of the ground and burns the grass brown.  

Some years you can chase a crop, some years you can't.  It's not too late to think about chasing a crop ..... but with the Nor'west rain on the other side of the island  the target crop is under water, so we started making up more nucs again yesterday from a few yards in the soon to be drought zone.

It was very easy. Everything has been knocked down to  a single brood box,  so we breezed through again, pulling out   two frames of brood, shaking the bees off the frames , and  placing them in the honey box above the queen excluder, next to a frame of honey . We then put two or three  frames of foundation back in the brood.

By the time we had worked the yard, we started again.  The bees had come up and covered the brood  ready to be transferred with a   frame of honey into a  blocked in nuc box. We then  moved them to the sheltered nuc yard 15 k's up the road.

Easy as .

 

Being a friday, I had an appointment with The Doc down the road , which worked out quite well, as after the appointment my designated driver drove me round to the nuc yard  and  we pulled the news paper plugs out of the nuc entrances.

 

Now all we need is the for the wind to stop blowing and the virgins might get a chance to get mated.

 

Nothing to it .... eh.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
25 minutes ago, jamesc said:

My Old Man was a seafarer.  He first went to sea in a time when they learnt the Rules of the Sea by rote , and was always quoting lines of verse when home life got a bit dodgy ....

"If in danger or in doubt, always keep a sharp lookout ....." 

But the one I liked most was   " If the wind's before the rain, then you may set sail again. But if the rain's before the wind, then your sail's and halyards mend ."

 

It's been blowing a gale here for days ..... hot and dry Nor'west  that sucks the moisture out of the ground and burns the grass brown.  

Some years you can chase a crop, some years you can't.  It's not too late to think about chasing a crop ..... but with the Nor'west rain on the other side of the island  the target crop is under water, so we started making up more nucs again yesterday from a few yards in the soon to be drought zone.

It was very easy. Everything has been knocked down to  a single brood box,  so we breezed through again, pulling out   two frames of brood, shaking the bees off the frames , and  placing them in the honey box above the queen excluder, next to a frame of honey . We then put two or three  frames of foundation back in the brood.

By the time we had worked the yard, we started again.  The bees had come up and covered the brood  ready to be transferred with a   frame of honey into a  blocked in nuc box. We then  moved them to the sheltered nuc yard 15 k's up the road.

Easy as .

 

Being a friday, I had an appointment with The Doc down the road , which worked out quite well, as after the appointment my designated driver drove me round to the nuc yard  and  we pulled the news paper plugs out of the nuc entrances.

 

Now all we need is the for the wind to stop blowing and the virgins might get a chance to get mated.

 

Nothing to it .... eh.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Don't come over here as there is nothing happening.Still getting rain and wind.I don't think the rata will flower.Maybe a season with no honey at all and I have not seen that happen for a while.

  • Agree 1
  • Sad 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 minutes ago, frazzledfozzle said:


it’s difficult for me to see what the future is for commercial beekeeping in NZ.

 

Obviously we won’t be getting the high prices for our Bush honeys that we have recently but where will the price settle and where will the demand come from.

Will we be able to still make a living from honey or will we go back to working a second job.

The Manuka areas are becoming even more crowded than before with more beekeepers trying to keep their businesses afloat.

 

i know beekeeping itself will keep going but what will the face of commercial beekeeping look like and who will be a part of it.

 

 

 

I had a quieter day the other day , cruising around the traps looking at newly mated queens and  mulling over the State of the Nation.

And this morning I read an article about the type of new breed company CEO who needs to be directing business's into the future of these challenging times. 

And I look back over the past twenty nine summers that we have kept bees , and I look at where we are today , and there is no doubt that we have thrived.

 

We started keeping bees when honey was $1.90/kg.  Our first Manuka crop was worth $4.80/kg.  We gave the landowners 10%. We put it into a pot at $20/kg and sold it into the UK.

We have been lucky to have family in strategic places who have shared our dreams.

Even though the price was low, we kept a low profile and made money. When times were good we expanded, invested like wise virgins and when the oil in the pot ran out, we had something of value to sell to carry us through.

 

The new breed of CEO needs to be a lateral thinker ..... a juggler of many pots with a view to the big picture, the long picture rather than the quick buck. The Chinese are very good at that. They think in terms of generations and plan for that.

Diversification is the key.

 You need  more than one string  to your bow to give it the power to make the arrow hit the mark..... assuming you want to hit the mark!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, frazzledfozzle said:


it’s difficult for me to see what the future is for commercial beekeeping in NZ.

 

Obviously we won’t be getting the high prices for our Bush honeys that we have recently but where will the price settle and where will the demand come from.

Will we be able to still make a living from honey or will we go back to working a second job.

The Manuka areas are becoming even more crowded than before with more beekeepers trying to keep their businesses afloat.

 

i know beekeeping itself will keep going but what will the face of commercial beekeeping look like and who will be a part of it.

 

 

 

A fight to the bottom,? Especially within honey only businesses who target Man.

I still see big expansion in two locals, which I don't understand. I don't have to, unless it adversely affects our business.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
34 minutes ago, Gino de Graaf said:

A fight to the bottom,? Especially within honey only businesses who target Man.

I still see big expansion in two locals, which I don't understand. I don't have to, unless it adversely affects our business.

 


@Gino de Graaf has there been any undercutting in pollination this season ?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, frazzledfozzle said:


@Gino de Graaf has there been any undercutting in pollination this season ?

There has been some, but not much in the scheme of things.

Smart kiwi growers will stay with the beeks who have given good service as they cant trust million dollar crops to un-knowns for a few dollars less.

I had two kiwi growers (about 300 hives worth) tell me to put my price up next year as they making money.

I was going to do it this year but thought Id hold off and see how much undercutting went on and what orchard work losses if any i may loose.

I lost none and was asked to do more. So i will up my price and do more next season.

  • Like 4
  • Agree 1
  • Good Info 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Bighands said:

Don't come over here as there is nothing happening.Still getting rain and wind.I don't think the rata will flower.Maybe a season with no honey at all and I have not seen that happen for a while.

I have a suspicion that its only the nothern rata that will flower well this yr.

 But I still have trouble sorting the trees out .

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Dennis Crowley said:

There has been some, but not much in the scheme of things.

Smart kiwi growers will stay with the beeks who have given good service as they cant trust million dollar crops to un-knowns for a few dollars less.

I had two kiwi growers (about 300 hives worth) tell me to put my price up next year as they making money.

I was going to do it this year but thought Id hold off and see how much undercutting went on and what orchard work losses if any i may loose.

I lost none and was asked to do more. So i will up my price and do more next season.

 

nice.

our pollination typically runs at a loss (you can do spring honey flow or pollination, not both). hows that going to play out with current honey prices i do not know.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Bighands said:

Don't come over here as there is nothing happening.Still getting rain and wind.I don't think the rata will flower.Maybe a season with no honey at all and I have not seen that happen for a while.

Hmmm ..... everyday it rains and blows it's guts out , the price of the honey in my shed is going up.😴

Big Hands, the question that has been at the forefront of my mind for the last month or so is ...... you coasters must be flat out feeding bees  all day long ....?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Dennis Crowley said:

There has been some, but not much in the scheme of things.

Smart kiwi growers will stay with the beeks who have given good service as they cant trust million dollar crops to un-knowns for a few dollars less.

I had two kiwi growers (about 300 hives worth) tell me to put my price up next year as they making money.

I was going to do it this year but thought Id hold off and see how much undercutting went on and what orchard work losses if any i may loose.

I lost none and was asked to do more. So i will up my price and do more next season.

Yes, no loss for us either. And did more also. We also considered lifting our prices, but held off. When orchards sell or change management is where you can win or lose.

55 minutes ago, jamesc said:

Hmmm ..... everyday it rains and blows it's guts out , the price of the honey in my shed is going up.😴

Big Hands, the question that has been at the forefront of my mind for the last month or so is ...... you coasters must be flat out feeding bees  all day long ....?

Yeah, but... Been awesome 3 weeks weather wise and reckon good early crop already on, which is likely bush...

3 hours ago, frazzledfozzle said:


@Gino de Graaf has there been any undercutting in pollination this season ?

No, maybe a bit with new semi small entrants who do it with low overheads and hold other occupations. They can't stay at that price for long. 

Edited by Gino de Graaf

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Skyscape for Goran!

A1C8C168-2EFB-4529-9CAB-1A77114792AB.jpeg

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Beautiful day on thurs,trailer refurb completed so tiki toured up the east coast,prospecting ,inspecting,supering and snorkelling...

IMG_20191207_220946.jpg

IMG_20191207_220923.jpg

IMG_20191207_220906.jpg

IMG_20191207_220846.jpg

IMG_20191207_220731.jpg

IMG_20191207_221154.jpg

IMG_20191207_221117.jpg

  • Like 8

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

By Crikey Phil46 ..... that was one heck of  busyday. Last photo looks like a petri dish .....😎

OKPhil46 .....I'm gonna take a lead from you and start to post selfies. It promotes community.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Kina?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes it was a busy day for a day off...left home at 5am,got back thru the gate at 9pm.Bit more than a petrie dish...i called it an "entree for my missus".

As for selfies,well it easier taking the pics before u start working hives or after,pain in the butt when gloved up an they covered in nectar,propolis or wateva else an trying to do

And yes a wee taste of kina ,Oma😊

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, tommy dave said:

spiky gold eh

interesting how a tv series is making a commercial fishing hero of a fisheries poacher eh: https://www.odt.co.nz/regions/southland/diver-convicted

Cant say iv seen the series,makes me shudder to think of the amount they process/take.

My contact on the east coast up here was telling me about the antics of a nationally known mussel producer who are now banned from their area...nightime diving,multiple tank setups etc etc

  • Sad 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...