Jump to content

Recommended Posts

HI all! First time poster, new backyard beekeeper here!

Checked on our hive yesterday (currently single FD) and noticed there are a few queen cells! These were not there last week. I asked the tutor of my beeking night class course i did last tern what to do about them and she said to remove them. What is the best way to go about this?? I do not want the hive to swarm. 

 

There is capped brood in the centre frames (saw bees hatching when i checked yesterday, but difficulty spotting any new larvae) and pollen/honey, the frames are starting to stick together but the outer frames on both endsstill have not been drawn out yet (we have had this hive 7 weeks). Is this normal for this time frame? If not what can we do to encourage them to build their wax on the outer frames?

 

Should we put another box on top? Partner was reluctant as they still have frames to draw out in the current box.

 

 

All advice and feedback welcome!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hard to tell what you are seeing without a picture regarding the queen cells.

 

With a new hive, you must expand the brood nest for the bees , otherwise they will get cramped and may swarm. It seldom occurrs to them to move sideways.

 

You need to learn to read what the bees require. Take one of your outer undrawn frames and plonk it straight in the middle of the brood nest. The bees will draw it out and  the queen will lay in it .

 

This is very basic beekeeping that you should have been taught . Removing queen cells just doesn’t cut it on its own 

 

Welcome to the forum !

 

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Where are the queen cells on the frames, along the bottom or higher up?  If they are higher up they could be emergency cells or supercedure cells.  Along the bottom means the hive is most likely preparing to swarm and removing the cells is the right thing to do.  Before you tear out cells you need to be sure you still have a laying queen.  Finding the queen is helpful, but not absolutely necessary.  If you see eggs then you know you had a laying queen within the last 3 days.  If you have no laying queen and you take the queen cells out your hive is in big trouble.  Once you have confirmed you have a laying queen you can take the queen cells out.  Just tear them out with your hive tool.  Keep checking weekly and removing new cells until they stop producing them.  If you miss one your hive will very likely swarm. Adding space as noted above is very important or they will just keep making cells.  For future reference, it is easier to prevent a hive going into swarm mode by ensuring the queen has always got somewhere to lay than it is to get them out of swarm mode once they have started making cells.

  • Agree 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

To add to the confusion , lack of eggs doesn’t  always mean the queen has died. This time of the year if the hive is  about to swarm you won’t see any eggs either. The brood cells will be back filled with nectar.

 

  • Like 1
  • Good Info 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
18 minutes ago, nikki watts said:

To add to the confusion , lack of eggs doesn’t  always mean the queen has died. This time of the year if the hive is  about to swarm you won’t see any eggs either. The brood cells will be back filled with nectar.

 

And to add confusion to that , a back filled brood nest doesn’t necessarily mean they are going to swarm either .

Most if my hives are heavily backfilled with pollen and a bit of nectar right at the moment . Something to do with the dearth , followed by a sudden influx of available food . It caught them a bit unaware 

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...