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7 minutes ago, yesbut said:

Just discovered Paul Stamets a mycologist who heads a mushroom product company. Amongst a heap of TED talks and other publications he has produced this.

Which is interesting.

https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-018-32194-8).

Haven't heard it yet. But mushrooms are amazing. Most of us were told to be wary of them, not taught to harvest correctly. It's going to be the next big thing

Edited by Gino de Graaf

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Tried to get him here for this years conference, but not available, next year may b on the cards.

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6 hours ago, Gino de Graaf said:

Most of us were told to be wary of them

remember you can eat any mushroom at least once.

 

 

Edited by nab
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Read that a mould that grows in the hives actually suspresses AFB... Penicillium Waksmanii. Natures kind enough to have antidotes to most things we just need to be smart enough & quick enough to find them before we get wiped out.

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18 hours ago, Anne said:

Read that a mould that grows in the hives actually suspresses AFB... Penicillium Waksmanii. Natures kind enough to have antidotes to most things we just need to be smart enough & quick enough to find them before we get wiped out.

I read a bit about it and I think one of the problems was that the bees kept removing the mushroom from the hives .

Like they do for most foreign objects .

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On 21/11/2019 at 12:23 PM, yesbut said:

Just discovered Paul Stamets a mycologist who heads a mushroom product company. Amongst a heap of TED talks and other publications he has produced this.

Which is interesting.

https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-018-32194-8).

Very interesting! I wonder if a foraging area which has been totally free of herbicides and insecticides would have a broad enough population of useful fungi naturally that the bees would be able to 'self treat'?

 

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Paul Stamets book- Mycelium Running, is really interesting. So is Michael Phillips- Mycorrhizal Planet. I think I like that one better. BookdepositoryUK is my fav  on line book store.

I found a source of NZ Native Oyster mushrooms that I am experimenting with. Almost got the wooden dowels of both strains ready to plug into some cabbage tree trunks. 

now I wait impatiently for the supplier to get his NZ Shiitake mushies ready for sale.

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2 hours ago, mischief said:

Paul Stamets book- Mycelium Running, is really interesting. So is Michael Phillips- Mycorrhizal Planet. I think I like that one better. BookdepositoryUK is my fav  on line book store.

I found a source of NZ Native Oyster mushrooms that I am experimenting with. Almost got the wooden dowels of both strains ready to plug into some cabbage tree trunks. 

now I wait impatiently for the supplier to get his NZ Shiitake mushies ready for sale.

Just needs to get his Shiitake together😉🤣

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We use Fomes fomentarius as smoker fuel, interesting.. Before someone also mentioned that it is good against viruses, now I can read something deeper about it. Thanks.

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