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frazzledfozzle

World honey prices

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1 hour ago, kaihoka said:

When the apple industry was in crisis a few yrs ago and trees were being pulled out the last men standing , who are doing well now ,  were the ones who held their never and built new infrastructure and expanded .

They were also ones who were so far in that there was no obvious road out .

Gold kiwis also. Very fortunate there, or diligent investing in new varieties.

But ostrich Anyone got any?

Or Mohair, Alpacas,

Mohair is doing ok now tho.

Sheep is on the rebound.

Avocado, well that was bad for a while. And recently lucrative, not sure how long. 

Ebb and flo

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17 minutes ago, Gino de Graaf said:

Gold kiwis also. Very fortunate there, or diligent investing in new varieties.

But ostrich Anyone got any?

Or Mohair, Alpacas,

Mohair is doing ok now tho.

Sheep is on the rebound.

Avocado, well that was bad for a while. And recently lucrative, not sure how long. 

Ebb and flo

But I have the next best big thing, just send me $10000 each for the opportunity of a life time. be quick or you'll miss out.

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On 30/11/2019 at 5:54 PM, Gino de Graaf said:

Comvita a poor example. Even these guys can't make a profit. 

That's because they're pushing harder into areas that are already over stocked by people trying to make a living like myself

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On 30/11/2019 at 11:08 PM, kaihoka said:

Do people think that if NZ honey market was not a protected market and had always had to compete with imports and the international price of honey the overstocking issue mighy never have happened .

 

Overstocking would have happened because that is caused by the money that manuka brought in, imports would not have changed it. However the boom and now bust would largely not have happened had not non manuka honey been blended with manuka and brought more money than it's worth as a stand alone. IE, if people had only ever been paid the real price for non manuka honey, a boom in that kind of honey would not have happened. I think there would still have been overstocking though as manuka hives are moved around.

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7 hours ago, Dennis Crowley said:

But I have the next best big thing, just send me $10000 each for the opportunity of a life time. be quick or you'll miss out.

Oh, what is it? 

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6 hours ago, Alastair said:

 

However the boom and now bust would largely not have happened had not non manuka honey been blended with manuka and brought more money than it's worth as a stand alone. IE, if people had only ever been paid the real price for non manuka honey, a boom in that kind of honey would not have happened. 


having been beekeeping before the boom I’m torn between whether it was a good thing or a bad thing.

obviously financially it has been a very good thing but it has also changed the face of beekeeping in NZ in a big way.

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10 hours ago, Gino de Graaf said:

Avocado, well that was bad for a while. And recently lucrative, not sure how long. 

Ebb and flo

Drive around the BoP and boy there are a lot of new avo plantings, I hope for their sake that there will be a market for them as if supply goes up but demand doesn't, the price will only come down. 

Look what happened to honey!

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2 minutes ago, Gwenyn Gwesty said:

Drive around the BoP and boy there are a lot of new avo plantings, I hope for their sake that there will be a market for them as if supply goes up but demand doesn't, the price will only come down. 

Look what happened to honey!

I don't know about the BOP and Avo plantings.  But go for a drive up into Northland.  Many thousand of Hectares have been converted into Avo plantings.  I have no idea where they think they will get the staff to harvest them.

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Unemployed beekeepers?

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Plenty labour up there. Problem being, smoking a pound a week leaves them mentally incapable of productive work.

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1 hour ago, Alastair said:

Plenty labour up there. Problem being, smoking a pound a week leaves them mentally incapable of productive work.

Yep.  Still gets back to the question of where they find the labour.

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10 minutes ago, Trevor Gillbanks said:

Yep.  Still gets back to the question of where they find the labour.

Just another example of pushing resource demand past the limit. 

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30 minutes ago, Trevor Gillbanks said:

Yep.  Still gets back to the question of where they find the labour.

No problem, bring in the overseas labour

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2 hours ago, Alastair said:

Plenty labour up there. Problem being, smoking a pound a week leaves them mentally incapable of productive work.

If they paid a decent wage lots of people may give up smoking those pounds .

But I have read methamphetamine is a big problem.

It is possible that all this new horticultural development is with borrowed money on costings of low labour rates .

The only entity that is always in a win win position is the bank .

 

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Yes well of course, meth is a worse problem.

 

Regarding minimum wagew and drug use, I can say that i have done my own fair share of work on little over minimum wage, and did not find this on it's own, caused me to use drugs.

 

A lot of those guys have my sympathies though, there are a whole raft of reasons why some people just don't know any different, or see any reason to be any different.

 

I can see the problems, just, I don't know the solutions.

Edited by Alastair
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1 hour ago, Alastair said:

Yes well of course, meth is a worse problem.

 

Regarding minimum wagew and drug use, I can say that i have done my own fair share of work on little over minimum wage, and did not find this on it's own, caused me to use drugs.

 

A lot of those guys have my sympathies though, there are a whole raft of reasons why some people just don't know any different, or see any reason to be any different.

 

I can see the problems, just, I don't know the solutions.

People I know who grew up in northland tell me about their grandparents and great grandparents wonderfull vege garden's that fed large extended families .

But it seems that is a thing of the past .

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2 hours ago, Bighands said:

No problem, bring in the overseas labour

Like me!

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I have been and worked in such gardens, in Ruatoria. Communal effort cos way back that's what people had to do. Digging kumara, at days end you walked back in a line with each hand in one handle of a kete (or however you spell it) and someone else got the other side.

 

Had a good laugh one day when I asked this very old lady what this particular kind of potato was called, she told me tutai kuri. And yes, that's pretty much what it looked like. 😄

 

I'll bet it is still done in places further from a town.

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30 minutes ago, Alastair said:

I have been and worked in such gardens, in Ruatoria. Communal effort cos way back that's what people had to do. Digging kumara, at days end you walked back in a line with each hand in one handle of a kete (or however you spell it) and someone else got the other side.

 

Had a good laugh one day when I asked this very old lady what this particular kind of potato was called, she told me tutai kuri. And yes, that's pretty much what it looked like. 😄

 

I'll bet it is still done in places further from a town.

How did they cure the kumara .

I cure mine and they keep well , but I am trying to imagine curing a whole paddock

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49 minutes ago, kaihoka said:

I cure mine and they keep well

How ??

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58 minutes ago, kaihoka said:

How did they cure the kumara .

I cure mine and they keep well , but I am trying to imagine curing a whole paddock

 

Sorry Kaihoka, that I don't know.

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1 hour ago, Alastair said:

I have been and worked in such gardens, in Ruatoria. Communal effort cos way back that's what people had to do. Digging kumara, at days end you walked back in a line with each hand in one handle of a kete (or however you spell it) and someone else got the other side.

 

Had a good laugh one day when I asked this very old lady what this particular kind of potato was called, she told me tutai kuri. And yes, that's pretty much what it looked like. 😄

 

I'll bet it is still done in places further from a town.

Hi @Alastair, my grandparents grew those potatoes at Waitoki many years ago , and now we’ve started growing them as well . Their other name is Urenika . Equally as descriptive !

they have purple flesh as well as the skin and everyone that tries them seems to like them . 

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2 minutes ago, Jas said:

Hi @Alastair, my grandparents grew those potatoes at Waitoki many years ago , and now we’ve started growing them as well . Their other name is Urenika . Equally as descriptive !

they have purple flesh as well as the skin and everyone that tries them seems to like them . 

Great little spuds,great flavour still grown in Ruatoria

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40 minutes ago, yesbut said:

How ??

You sweat them .

Put them in a shallow layer in a warm sunny place / room.

At night cover them with thin piece of plastic . One of those big cheap black plastic rubbish bags with green on it cut into single sheet is good .

In morning take off plastic and dry it out .

After about 5 or 6 days the plastic will be dry in morning .

I store in box under bed or in cool , but not real cold place .

The best kumara I store in warm place for slips , which I start potting up in august .

4 minutes ago, Bighands said:

Great little spuds,great flavour still grown in Ruatoria

They grow wild in the garden here .

They can take over .

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6 hours ago, Bighands said:

No problem, bring in the overseas labour

Your so right @Bighands that is exactly what is done in a big way. Pacific Island/Melanesian men for the picking and then the women folk for the pruning etc, not just Avo.

I know two couples in the north who make a great living helping to manage the crews, make sure they get to work and back each day etc etc, a bit better than slavery but has it's similarities.

From what I saw part of the art is making sure certain culture groups don't mix it up with other cultures as it can lead to real trouble. 

Seasonal labour but it gives an opportunity for the folk who come here to take something home with them that is far more than they would have staying home.

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