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frazzledfozzle

World honey prices

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On 21/11/2019 at 1:08 PM, Alastair said:

Turning into fat is one problem, the other is surging blood sugar levels leading to insulin resistance, which a majority of adult westerners now have to some extent.

As a fairly recent diagnosed diabetic , extraction week lead to high sugar levels .

now controlled without medications ( bad reaction to the frontline meds ) by cutting out sugar ( honey) and carbs and losing 20kgs .

I do miss my slab of bread and honey 

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9 minutes ago, Rob Atkinson said:

losing 20kgs

You will be sexy before you know it

 

 

 

My view is this the future need to be sold like this:

 

1. Sugar is empty calories.  Honey is not.  It is the healthier sugar.  No one is quitting sugar unless they have too.  Why because sugar is a drug. 

 

2. The future is protein, forget about making honey and make pollen instead. 

Edited by flash4cash
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10 hours ago, flash4cash said:

You will be sexy before you know it

 

 

 

My view is this the future need to be sold like this:

 

1. Sugar is empty calories.  Honey is not.  It is the healthier sugar.  No one is quitting sugar unless they have too.  Why because sugar is a drug. 

 

2. The future is protein, forget about making honey and make pollen instead. 

I think the politics around sugar production will keep it a major industry regardless of how much science stacks up against it .

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On 19/11/2019 at 4:34 PM, Christi An said:

there certainly are consumers that pay a premium price for a premium product, but why would a german/french/whatever consumer buy honey from the other side of the world instead of just going to a local beekeeper nearby and actually be able to determine if that persons practices justify the claims for high quality and the high price.

In western economies there is always % of savvy consumers with disposable income that choose products based on more that price alone. French Brie can win over the German equivalent in Germany. English Cheddar can win over a Belgian equivalent. French Champaign will win over as sparkling Spanish Chardonnay. A % of consumers will pay for quality product from NZ. It is up to us to define that % and grow it. NZ only produces 1% of global honey consumption. We should be able to sell all we produce once we have re established markets and defined our points of difference. 

4 hours ago, kaihoka said:

I think the politics around sugar production will keep it a major industry regardless of how much science stacks up against it .

Very good point. We have recently developed a range of Naturally flavoured clover honey. Caramel, Vanilla, Orange, Lime, Lemon and Ginger. This is directly aimed as an alternative spread, dip, topping to 'Processed' sugar based jams and preserves or high fat spreads such as peanut butter. 

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2 hours ago, Adam Boot said:

Very good point. We have recently developed a range of Naturally flavoured clover honey. Caramel, Vanilla, Orange, Lime, Lemon and Ginger. This is directly aimed as an alternative spread, dip, topping to 'Processed' sugar based jams and preserves or high fat spreads such as peanut butter. 

I have tried making low sugar jams , it is never very sucessful.

They have to be stored in the fridge when opened.

I think jam was initially a way of preserving fruit by replacing all the water with sugar .

There  are mountains of sugar in wharehouses in south east asia .

it could all be turned into jet fuel .

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On 23/11/2019 at 1:29 PM, Adam Boot said:

NZ only produces 1% of global honey consumption. We should be able to sell all we produce once we have re established markets and defined our points of difference. 

Yes however the beekeeper needs a direct stake in the brand without the brand they will always remain poor, with no long term security.

 

The brand owner is always the most powerful player in the game. It means sweet FA benefit if midland's honey has a strong brand.  Their owners, who ever they are will want all the benefit to go to them. 

 

Until beekeepers smarten up, they will go round and round in circles. 

Edited by flash4cash
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Really good news this morning via the BBC.  Always great to follow the BIG Supermarket chains in Europe - Tesco, Aldi, Costco, Sainsburys etc.

They seem to lead the supply chain efforts on quality and also pesticides especially when it comes to protecting our bees.

https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-50551385?fbclid=IwAR1gl6SYg3Vo5fWZVyML2xyObMYhLbeBg8LUIiX3Dd2Re7t5IW8PuNvfreQ

Perhaps now they have a focus on adulterated honey......and that can only benefit NZ.

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On 21/11/2019 at 12:47 AM, yesbut said:

Dr Google says while honey has nearly the same sucrose/glucose content as cane sugar, the body cannot convert it to fat so easily because it is NOT so easily processed.

 

Quote: " honey contain simple carbohydrates - glucose and fructose which are easily used for developing energy ( and lower consumption of insulin), surplus is stored as energy reserve ( glycogen). In difference to honey, commercial sugar in organism is previously degraded to glucose and fructose after what molecules of glucose and fructose are used as " engine fuel", and all surplus is converted into fat tissue. Beside that commercial sugar doesn't contain nothing more than so called " empty calories", while honey is abundant also in other nutritive and healthy compounds..."

 

On 23/11/2019 at 3:37 AM, kaihoka said:

I have tried making low sugar jams , it is never very sucessful.

They have to be stored in the fridge when opened.

I think jam was initially a way of preserving fruit by replacing all the water with sugar .

There  are mountains of sugar in wharehouses in south east asia .

it could all be turned into jet fuel .

 

This year we made plum jam  - roughly on 100kg of plums we added around 5-6kg of sugar.. Nothing else added for conserving, except cooked properly and placed into jars. Can stay for very long time in storage/pantry. Some even couple years last, if left forgotten. The best - warm jam into warm jars..

On 22/11/2019 at 12:00 PM, Alastair said:

 

Perga is processed by bees and stored (  fermented) pollen in the combs. It has much higher nutritive and medicinal value than plain pollen. It isn't bee larva..

 

In line with topic.. Black locust honey price at my place is around 7 nzd/kg at large ( in drums).. But there isn't much of it and in purity needed this season..

For other multifloral honeys I heard some beeks went to around 3,5 nzd/kg - desperate or pulling out of business.. Such cheap honey I don't have ( for now 🤐)..

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2 hours ago, Goran said:

Can stay for very long time in storage/pantry. Some even couple years last, if left forgotten. The best - warm jam into warm jars..

Low sugar jam will keep well if it is poured hot into hot jars and the lids go down .

Its when you break the seal and open it that it will not keep .

It will keep in a fridge but chilled food often has refuced flavour .

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America's biggest milk producer, Dean Foods, has filed for bankruptcy and is planning to sell assets.

https://www.ruralnewsgroup.co.nz/rural-news/rural-world-news/us-milk-giant-goes-bung

The Dallas listed processor is blaming declining milk sales triggered by increased competition from dairy alternatives such as oat and almond milk.

 

3 minutes ago, CraBee said:

America's biggest milk producer, Dean Foods, has filed for bankruptcy and is planning to sell assets.

https://www.ruralnewsgroup.co.nz/rural-news/rural-world-news/us-milk-giant-goes-bung

The Dallas listed processor is blaming declining milk sales triggered by increased competition from dairy alternatives such as oat and almond milk.

 

 

Yes Ms Frazzled maybe not great for milk producers, maybe OK though for almond pollinators 🙂

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gino, surely you've heard of bee milk, been around longer than almond milk, so we should be able to promote it as the original alternative to dairy.

 

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26 minutes ago, CraBee said:

America's biggest milk producer, Dean Foods, has filed for bankruptcy and is planning to sell assets.

https://www.ruralnewsgroup.co.nz/rural-news/rural-world-news/us-milk-giant-goes-bung

The Dallas listed processor is blaming declining milk sales triggered by increased competition from dairy alternatives such as oat and almond milk.

 

 

Yes Ms Frazzled maybe not great for milk producers, maybe OK though for almond pollinators 🙂

I read that and other things about the decline of dairy and I was concerned about NZs  future because dairy is such a big part of our economy .

But then I read that our space program is a billion dollar industry and a huge employer .

So I feel happier now , this is a future industry thats just going to grow and NZ is in at the beginning .

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Some of the milk companies are attempting to stop the makers of other "milks" such as almond milk being allowed to call them milk.

 

The argument goes that using the term milk is confusing for consumers, when the other products typically contain far less of all the goodies, than actual milk does. They claim these products are just some ground up oats, or whatever, dissolved in water. Not to mention they can contain quite a few artificial chemical additives, and way more sugar.

 

I think they have a point.

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@Alastair

 I do not know how vegans can refuse to drink cows milk because of exploitation of cows but can comfortably drink almond milk without considering the exploitation of bees woken up in the middle of winter and shipped 100s of miles away  from home .

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I tried to find the country of origin of the almonds on almond milk the other day!  I was curious. 

 

You don’t know, what you don’t know unless you are curious enough to ask.

 

Do the non-dairy by choice people know about the bees & the almonds? Probably not. The producers of almond milk certainly aren’t going to mention it!

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Hard core vegans will certainly know that bees pollinate their almond milk. 

 

But although they rant about bees and evil beekeepers, they must choose to mentally blank out the awkward truth that a good deal of their food is pollinated by commercially supplied bees. Acknowledging that would leave them very slim pickings indeed ha ha. 😉

Edited by Alastair
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7 hours ago, olbe said:

gino, surely you've heard of bee milk, been around longer than almond milk, so we should be able to promote it as the original alternative to dairy.

 

A creamer and sweetener in one

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7 hours ago, Alastair said:

Hard core vegans will certainly know that bees pollinate their almond milk.

i've got vegan friends who don't eat honey, and others who do. It's one of those foods that seems on the divide. Pretty much all of them are keen (or have already) to some day jump in a beesuit

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3 minutes ago, tommy dave said:

i've got vegan friends who don't eat honey, and others who do. It's one of those foods that seems on the divide. Pretty much all of them are keen (or have already) to some day jump in a beesuit

My sister is a vegan , an animal rights vegan , she eats my honey and my eggs .

She tries  very hard to  be consistent but it is difficult.

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Good to know they are not all extremists Tommy and Kaihoka, i guess everyone is an individual and applies their own interpretation on what they percieve to be veganism.

 

Here is a link to a document that was written some years ago and has becomne the "official" vegan view on bees and beekeepers. From it - Beekeepers will naturally deny that they are slave owners who steal the products of the bees' labor. They will tell you that they are working with the bees to help them reach their full potential, which just happens to be measured in honey output. (Hmm, remind anyone of recombinant bovine growth hormone?) In addition to being horribly paternalistic, the beekeeper's perspective makes little sense.

 

http://www.vegetus.org/honey/honey.htm

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I know a few vegans as well.

 

To me it seems ridiculous to label someone by their choice of diet, and generalising their behaviour as all the same 

 

There are outliers in all walks of life 

 

What is it with this nonsense of labelling people these days 

Edited by M4tt

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Thing with veganism, it is not a diet. It is a way of life, a way of thinking, an attitude to the world.

 

If it is just viewed as a diet, that is not true veganism.

Edited by Alastair

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40 minutes ago, M4tt said:

What is it with this nonsense of labelling people these days 

Says the Moolooo

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