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World honey prices

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13 minutes ago, jamesc said:

@Maru HoaniGood to see you got a hammer hand on to help !

The only way to learn is on the job😁 

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@Thomas Clow can your initiative be restarted? 

Can we find big money now to promote anything but M? 

Can the government now act on adding value? 

Can you change your platform to a NGO? 

Can we establish a large warehouse to store, inventory, package and sell to the world? 

Can we be like Hyundai, skoda, - enter a new market in a big way low cost but great value. Adding value as we develop.

 

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2 hours ago, Gino de Graaf said:

@Thomas Clow can your initiative be restarted? 

Can we find big money now to promote anything but M? 

Can the government now act on adding value? 

Can you change your platform to a NGO? 

Can we establish a large warehouse to store, inventory, package and sell to the world? 

Can we be like Hyundai, skoda, - enter a new market in a big way low cost but great value. Adding value as we develop.

 

Or be like zespri a single desk sellere of all honeys from N.Z. Look at the prices being acheived by them.

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1 hour ago, Bighands said:

Or be like zespri a single desk sellere of all honeys from N.Z. Look at the prices being acheived by them.

I can't imagine all the current Packers and exporters being happy to consolidate without some huge payouts.

 

It's odd how non Manuka get such poor returns compared to other countries. 

Especially considering the strong nz Manuka marketing and Jacinda affect.

 

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I don't really understand it myself, but it seems we lost our international supermarket space for table honeys from about 2015. Its now taken by Canada, Argentina, etc. I expect a few thousand tonnes would go at the Argentinian/canadian price to keep things afloat for people, but there are presently no buyers/exporters with that interest as far as I am aware. 

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23 hours ago, Bighands said:

I hope so as well but people do not have the money to spend as no work.You watch, a world depression I am afraid

higher tax's so the govt can recoop some of the money they have given out, 

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1 hour ago, kevin moore said:

higher tax's so the govt can recoop some of the money they have given out, 

Not initially, and not likely while interest is low. 

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On 30/04/2020 at 10:49 PM, Brother Adamson said:

If anybody is curious about non-manuka values in the US this is the monthly USDA honey report: https://www.ams.usda.gov/mnreports/fvmhoney.pdf It shows that American white clover is selling for about $1.50 per pound (approx NZD $5.30 per kg), Argentinean clover for a bit less than that. But the only NZ clover honey sold into the US so far this year has been 1 container at about NZ $3.20 per KG! So nobody has a bulk market there, and certainly not at a premium to US honey. Of course, not a good time to be getting one either. 

NZ bulk clover is actually competing with all other basic honey imported from around the world. Take a look at those prices (Duty Paid)? Then look at where the honey is being used as an ingredient or a retail product? Then check retail prices for jars or Squeezy of Non Manuka per 100g in store? Who are you aiming NZ clover at? Why should they pay a premium? 

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23 minutes ago, Boot said:

NZ bulk clover is actually competing with all other basic honey imported from around the world. Take a look at those prices (Duty Paid)? Then look at where the honey is being used as an ingredient or a retail product? Then check retail prices for jars or Squeezy of Non Manuka per 100g in store? Who are you aiming NZ clover at? Why should they pay a premium? 

Hi Adam. Maybe that is why it's not a product worth pursuing for marketers. .

Too little to gain, or not enough for the producers after cost 

Can NZ honey not be more attractive by a few dollars sitting alongside M? 

 

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5 hours ago, Bron said:

Hey Adam, @Boot.

 

I don’t do what you do so I’m grasping at straws however, Some of our honeys are only found in NZ such as our mono floral native honeys and our multi floral bush blends. Positives that I see are
We don’t use anti-biotic for AFB.

We don’t import any honey into NZ (other than from some of the islands) 

We are geographically isolated.

Can in most cases create a really great “story” about small generational family businesses.

Etc

 

As far as I know most international bulk honey buyers, unfortunately, don't put any value on these factors.

It is about price.  Alot of honey is used as an ingredient, its a commodity.

I can see how a NZ brand could develop these themes to add value at a retail level, but not at the bulk buyer / wholesale level.

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If the  giant hornets the size of a matchbox they have in the US at present (according to Aljazeera) get a real hold, the US market could expand hugely as their own bees are wiped out, and as already most of their supermarket honey contains faux Chinese crud, we only have to market as 100% bees produced honey to be on a winner. 

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5 minutes ago, Sailabee said:

If the  giant hornets the size of a matchbox they have in the US at present (according to Aljazeera) get a real hold, the US market could expand hugely as their own bees are wiped out, and as already most of their supermarket honey contains faux Chinese crud, we only have to market as 100% bees produced honey to be on a winner. 

Nah, they will throw nukes on hornets and will save their bees same as they intend to do on tornadoes..

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1 hour ago, Sailabee said:

and as already most of their supermarket honey contains faux Chinese crud, we only have to market as 100% bees produced honey to be on a winner. 

there was a thread recently about earrings

in the same vein, wonder what would happen if the president of the united states tweeted that chinese honey is virus risk, and that any honey on the shelves that might contain chinese honey should be dumped?

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Posted (edited)
27 minutes ago, tommy dave said:

there was a thread recently about earrings

in the same vein, wonder what would happen if the president of the united states tweeted that chinese honey is virus risk, and that any honey on the shelves that might contain chinese honey should be dumped?

Uh huh.... sow that seed, few more whiskeys and he might get on his twitter twatter .... and history will be made.

Edited by jamesc

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12 minutes ago, jamesc said:

Uh huh.... sow that seed, few more whiskeys and he might get on his twitter twatter .... and history will be made.

time for someone to fire up some bots and inspire fox news to run it as a story

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4 hours ago, Sailabee said:

most of their supermarket honey contains faux Chinese crud

Is this fact or conjecture ?

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6 hours ago, yesbut said:

Is this fact or conjecture ?

 

Family who have been there recently and read the labels in the supermarkets - including the small print. 

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I remember a sales trip one year to the UK.  A nationwide 'Health food store' had a pallet of cheap honey in the centre isle ..... half the price of local stuff.

I bought some for my breakie toast. It was dark amber, runny, very sweet and syrupy.

It was revolting.

The labelling was very ambiguous, but the sales assistant said it came from ...... china.

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20 hours ago, Boot said:

NZ bulk clover is actually competing with all other basic honey imported from around the world. Take a look at those prices (Duty Paid)? Then look at where the honey is being used as an ingredient or a retail product? Then check retail prices for jars or Squeezy of Non Manuka per 100g in store? Who are you aiming NZ clover at? Why should they pay a premium? 

I bet their honey analysis and compliance isn't as strict as NZ.

 

I would like to see NZ clover as a premium product, differentiating it from others produced in the world.  If we stuck to light colour with a very high clover pollen content this would give a premium honey.  Some years it's not difficult to get 80+% pollen. This gives a product that tastes like 1960s clover honey.

 

The government is telling us the need for emphasis on NZ produced product, our healthy relative covid free image, and to think outside the square for domestic and international markets.  

51 minutes ago, jamesc said:

I remember a sales trip one year to the UK.  A nationwide 'Health food store' had a pallet of cheap honey in the centre isle ..... half the price of local stuff.

I bought some for my breakie toast. It was dark amber, runny, very sweet and syrupy.

It was revolting.

The labelling was very ambiguous, but the sales assistant said it came from ...... china.

On a trip to the UK several years ago, I was surprised at the poor labelling in food shops.  I would have thought the EU would have had strong labeling regulations.  

Was also surprised at the amount of Best By and Use By stuff that was on some shelves.  Here, supermarkets remove it or put it in the sales bin prior to the date.  

 

We pay large $ for compliance, and I think some of this is quite unnecessary, but at the same time we should be using it as a major market tool.

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Many labels state from EU. I can guess large volume of non EU honey enters via outlining borders. Re classified and on sold as EU sourced honey.

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19 minutes ago, Gino de Graaf said:

Many labels state from EU. I can guess large volume of non EU honey enters via outlining borders. Re classified and on sold as EU sourced honey.

 

That is a pretty big coverage for a label.  

EU and the country would be a lot better.

That is sure open to rout. 

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2 hours ago, Maggie James said:

I would like to see NZ clover as a premium product, differentiating it from others produced in the world.  If we stuck to light colour with a very high clover pollen content this would give a premium honey.  Some years it's not difficult to get 80+% pollen. This gives a product that tastes like 1960s clover honey.

In response to the above quote, and several others like it in the thread:

Most temperate countries, particularly western countries, produce Clover honey, which like ours can be light colour with high pollen content. We have very little reason for value add. 

When a consumer is viewing Clover honey products from NZ, Canada, Switzerland etc. they won't pay significantly more for NZ sourced, irrespective of what we would like them to see...

 

Also in response to Bron's comment:

"Some of our honeys are only found in NZ such as our mono floral native honeys and our multi floral bush blends. Positives that I see are
We don’t use anti-biotic for AFB.

We don’t import any honey into NZ (other than from some of the islands) 

We are geographically isolated.

Can in most cases create a really great “story” about small generational family businesses."

 

Many countries have honeys that are only found there. Sorry exclusive source is not a significant reason for consumers to pay a premium. 

Many, many brands throughout the world create a really great “story” about small generational family businesses. This is not a significant reason for consumers to pay a premium

The other reasons mentioned are already included in demand pricing for NZ honeys, we won't get much additional pricing from them. 

 

Sorry if this post seems excessively negative.

What the factors I've seen listed tend to have in common is that they are seen from the producer's perspective.

What I'm trying to introduce is to see things from the buyer's perspective. 

Consumers are motivated more from 'what benefit can I get from this purchase' than 'what production factors went into this product'.

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9 minutes ago, kaihoka said:

this article suggest  some in the honey industry are doing very well.

https://www.nzherald.co.nz/business/news/article.cfm?c_id=3&objectid=12329965

 


what does it say @kaihoka ?

18 minutes ago, Rob's BP said:

Sorry if this post seems excessively negative.

What the factors I've seen listed tend to have in common is that they are seen from the producer's perspective.

What I'm trying to introduce is to see things from the buyer's perspective. 

Consumers are motivated more from 'what benefit can I get from this purchase' than 'what production factors went into this product'.


Im not sure that’s actually true for all consumers.

When I think of my own situation I have been through 2 phases of consumerism.

The first was buying on price, because money was tight I would buy cheap jams, bread, cheese etc etc .

i wasn’t really concerned about who it was made by or how it was made.

Now I’m at a different phase in my life.

The kids are independent and I am financially secure so I can afford to be more picky about what I spend money on.

 

Now I will look for mum and dad retailers, food made by small businesses , pay extra to shop locally rather than at the big supermarkets all the time.

pay more for veges by shopping at local vege markets.

 

When I travel overseas I love to buy from stalls and local markets.

when travelling around NZ I will buy honey from local beekeepers.

 

NZ is such a tiny market when it comes to honey, if we concentrate on targeting those financially sound people who like to try foods from other countries I’m sure they would favour NZ over some other countries because of  how NZ has been marketed overseas as being clean, green unadulterated. And if it’s made by a small family business rather than a big company then that’s even better. 

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