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World honey prices


frazzledfozzle
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From the commercial beekeepers Facebook page mostly US based but lots of other posters from around the world also.

This gives some insight into what our marketers have to compete with, so much cheap honey flooding the world market I guess we have to compete on a different level try to elevate our nz honeys to more than a commodity item.

 

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So why can’t we get a decent price for our honey? I’m in Mexico on a speaking tour. My friend finds Mexican honey for buyers. He showed a site that lists, by country, of honey being offered. A never ending list from dozens and dozens of countries. And dozens from each country. Metric tons of 55mm for $1100 at US port of entry. I bought a coffee in Vermont and used honey from a squeeze bottle. Typical nasty flavor of these imports. I asked where the honey was from. “A jug”. Oh please. The got me the jug. USDA Grade A. No country of origin. Oh wait...in dot matrix hiding on the back. Dark honey dark matrix. Finally found it. Product of Vietnam and Ukraine. Saw both countries on list and their honey is $1100 to 2000 a metric ton at US port of entry. Why is it that country of origin can’t be just below USDA Grade A, and in the same bold font. Because they’re screwing us and our government doesn’t give a rat’s ass.

 

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41 minutes ago, frazzledfozzle said:

I guess we have to compete on a different level try to elevate our nz honeys to more than a commodity item.

It is such a shame that honey is sold as a blend with no thought to the end use.

There is such variety of flavours , why would you use strong dark honey as a sweetner in drinks .

The wine industry promotes different wine for different occasions ,  and the cannabis industry has rebranded itself into seperate varieties .

I think in NZ the whole industry is centred on medicinal honey so no thought has been put into marketing on taste and flavour .

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there certainly are consumers that pay a premium price for a premium product, but why would a german/french/whatever consumer buy honey from the other side of the world instead of just going to a local beekeeper nearby and actually be able to determine if that persons practices justify the claims for high quality and the high price.

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1 hour ago, Christi An said:

there certainly are consumers that pay a premium price for a premium product, but why would a german/french/whatever consumer buy honey from the other side of the world instead of just going to a local beekeeper nearby and actually be able to determine if that persons practices justify the claims for high quality and the high price.

I imagine there'd be as many city folk in Europe as there are here who wouldn't know a local beekeeper from their elbow.

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Maybe if the world turned to sugar shaming , like flight shaming , it would help boost honey comsumption .

But there is currently an over supply of sugar sitting in wharehouses in asia . It could be turned into fuel .

There are lots of arguments against sugar and not just from a health point of view .

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16 minutes ago, yesbut said:

I imagine there'd be as many city folk in Europe as there are here who wouldn't know a local beekeeper from their elbow.

 

you'd actually be suprised how many beehives there are in cities like berlin. Urban Beekeeping is a big thing at the moment (especially with the bee-extinction thing going on)

 

also there are plenty of supermarkets that sell honey from local beekeepers.

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29 minutes ago, M4tt said:

That could be helpful to us 

It’s certainly far from the truth here 

 

no it wouldnt. It would be helpful for nobody if it was true.

Luckliy with regards to honeybees it is not the case. Hive Numbers are increasing pretty much everywhere.

Insects and feral bees however disappear at a frightening rate. and with the crazy amount of spraying around here im sure it will be the case here as well.

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It's a battle alright . We get a monthly email from Albert Sapiano. Albert is a major player in the European honey industry and lists  whats for sale from all over the world.

It's depressing to see  the prices some of the honeys  are being offered for.

 

On the flip side, despite the fact that the world price is low , New Zealand is still able to move honey into market's that appreciates quality, and is prepared to pay for it. By looking beyond the square, and you may just get lucky ! 

 

 

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16 hours ago, Christi An said:

 

you'd actually be suprised how many beehives there are in cities like berlin. Urban Beekeeping is a big thing at the moment (especially with the bee-extinction thing going on)

 

also there are plenty of supermarkets that sell honey from local beekeepers.

How is there a bee extinction? There's probly more beehives than people in nz

And more bees in the world than people

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3 hours ago, Maru Hoani said:

How is there a bee extinction? There's probly more beehives than people in nz

And more bees in the world than people

 

that was exactly the point.

 

but media tell people otherwise, and plenty of them (especially the soy and avo eating type) pick up beekeeping to "save the world" and suddenly AFB infections soar.

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Back when, most NZ made honey was sold here in NZ. We were protected from overseas prices because of the import ban. 

 

Now, we make way more than can be consumed in NZ. 

 

There are 2 alternatives that the non manuka industry can take. Clever marketing, or, becoming paupers.

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21 hours ago, kaihoka said:

Maybe if the world turned to sugar shaming , like flight shaming , it would help boost honey comsumption .

But there is currently an over supply of sugar sitting in wharehouses in asia . It could be turned into fuel .

There are lots of arguments against sugar and not just from a health point of view .

Honey could be put into sugar shaming also...

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40 minutes ago, Alastair said:

Back when, most NZ made honey was sold here in NZ. We were protected from overseas prices because of the import ban. 

 

Now, we make way more than can be consumed in NZ. 

 

There are 2 alternatives that the non manuka industry can take. Clever marketing, or, becoming paupers.

i tend to agree Alistair.With this clever marketing I can see the industry being made a single desk entity. Similar to Zespri.Back in the 90's I approached Trade Enterprise and tried to get the honey marketers to not compete in the same market. I have heard of some horror stories of undercutting by N.Z. companies in foreign markets.My freind established a market in Japan for Manuka at a price that was acceptable to both parties.A certain company went up to Japan and undercut him by a considerable amount.No wonder the industry is not looking good when that happens.

4 minutes ago, Gino de Graaf said:

Honey could be put into sugar shaming also...

Of course it could but honey is not made up of one sugar, sucrose, but many sugars. It is more easily assimilated.

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13 minutes ago, Bighands said:

Of course it could but honey is not made up of one sugar, sucrose, but many sugars. It is more easily assimilated.

Dr Google says while honey has nearly the same sucrose/glucose content as cane sugar, the body cannot convert it to fat so easily because it is NOT so easily processed.

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19 minutes ago, yesbut said:

Dr Google says while honey has nearly the same sucrose/glucose content as cane sugar, the body cannot convert it to fat so easily because it is NOT so easily processed.

Does this mean honey can be promoted for weight loss? That would be clever marketing.

When eaten, where does most of it go, out the other end?

Does it get flushed? If so, then maybe it was a waste of time eating it in the first place?

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10 minutes ago, ChrisM said:

Does this mean honey can be promoted for weight loss? That would be clever marketing.

 

If not used immediately as energy, unfortunately, most of it will end up on the waist line.

 

There is a 2,500 year old quote in the Bible, a father giving advice to his son. "Eat honey my son, for it is good"

 

And 2,500 years ago, when people did not have access to a well stocked refrigerator plus a fast food place that delivers, that would no doubt have been good advice. Now though, when most western people are overnourished instead of undernourished, the extra carbs in honey, will most likely be added to the top line, rather than be used.

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43 minutes ago, Alastair said:

Still might be. What I do, in a private capacity, is attempt to persuade those I know, to not buy sugar and just use honey.

 

It can be done, haven't had sugar in our kitchen for years.

same here. Doesn't help honey producers financially though, it's just to make sure that i'm able to give away all the excess honey that ends up taking up space in buckets

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