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Medical Grade Manuka?


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Hi There,

 

I see some companies market their Manuka as medical grade.

 

At what UMF does Manuka become medical grade?

 

I saw something online that said UMF 10+ and over is considered medical grade, is this correct?

 

Cheers

I have since found this on Comvita's website for those interested:

 

"Certified UMF® Manuka Honey with a 10+ or higher rating is medical grade and therapeutic for the skin."

 

Cheers

 

 

I have since found this on Comvita's website for those interested:

 

"Certified UMF® Manuka Honey with a 10+ or higher rating is medical grade and therapeutic for the skin."

 

Cheers

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Correct, in Australia this is done so cheaply that some of the Aussie fruit in our supermarkets is irradiated to destroy pest insects before they send it to us. Got to be very cheap indeed for that to

When the NZ unit was built, walls were two foot thick concrete - the Aussie jobs I believe the walls are three metres thick, and they are several stories high, all completely automated. Capital cost w

its not just UMF, its a whole lot of other things. CFU count is a big one. i have heard of a long list of requirements but also have heard of honey buyers who don't care about those requirements.

its not just UMF, its a whole lot of other things. CFU count is a big one. i have heard of a long list of requirements but also have heard of honey buyers who don't care about those requirements.

end of the day it comes down to what the buyer wants done. 

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1 hour ago, Sailabee said:

If being used for topical application, pretty sure needs to be radiated - which now has to be done in Aussie as the one local plant no longer outsources.

Radiated ???

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There is a plant in Upper Hutt - built in the '60's. Was originally used to steralise dressing packs for hospitals etc, built by Tasman Vaccine Laboratory. In Aussie, they have huge plants where for jack zip, you put through all supers with frames, and totally steralised- including hive beetle, EFB and AFB as well as any viruses. Last I heard, about $15/box.

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18 minutes ago, Sailabee said:

There is a plant in Upper Hutt - built in the '60's. Was originally used to steralise dressing packs for hospitals etc, built by Tasman Vaccine Laboratory. In Aussie, they have huge plants where for jack zip, you put through all supers with frames, and totally steralised- including hive beetle, EFB and AFB as well as any viruses. Last I heard, about $15/box.

 

Correct, in Australia this is done so cheaply that some of the Aussie fruit in our supermarkets is irradiated to destroy pest insects before they send it to us. Got to be very cheap indeed for that to be economic. At an MPI arranged meeting i was at a while back I asked why we could not do the same in NZ, it's the initial set up cost, which is astronomic. 

 

15 minutes ago, Bighands said:

Surely if the Manuka honey is irradiated,doesnt that destroy the beneficial part of the equasion?

 

One would think so, but no. The question could be asked, why does medical grade manuka have to be irradiated, if manuka kills germs? The reason is that manuka kills many kinds of vegetative bacteria but does not kill spores. Medical grade manuka by definition, is applied to wounds of people who are already sick or infected. We cannot go adding spores of who knows what, into their wounds. Irradiating is the only way to ensure total sterility.

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1 hour ago, Alastair said:

 

 At an MPI arranged meeting i was at a while back I asked why we could not do the same in NZ, it's the initial set up cost, which is astronomic. 

 

 

 

 

When the NZ unit was built, walls were two foot thick concrete - the Aussie jobs I believe the walls are three metres thick, and they are several stories high, all completely automated. Capital cost would be huge.

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13 hours ago, Sailabee said:

If being used for topical application, pretty sure needs to be radiated - which now has to be done in Aussie as the one local plant no longer outsources.

but thats the product manufactures problem not the beeks.

these are not the sort of products you can make at home and sell down the market. 

those selling "medical manuka" at markets at UMF prices are selling fakes. 

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On 20/11/2019 at 9:06 AM, Bighands said:

Surely if the Manuka honey is irradiated,doesnt that destroy the beneficial part of the equasion?

 

Fortunately not - all the medical properties of the honey come from its physical and chemical composition. Irradiation is designed to kill live organisms present in the honey, like yeasts, moulds, bacteria, etc.

 

Edit: Whoops I see Alistair has already answered this question.

Edited by Jacob
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