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kaihoka

rata report

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@jamesc

 today I took my binoculars and went to a look see.

The rata around the edge of the estuary is pretty well budded up . These trees are normally earlier and are quite reliable flowerers even when its a bust elsewhere . But last yr even they did not really flower .

The rata in the hills has some definite flower  buds on parts of some trees .

a few of the big trees appear to be covered in buds but I am not yet convinced they are not leaf buds .

I will have a clearer picture in another week .

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18 minutes ago, kaihoka said:

@jamesc

 today I took my binoculars and went to a look see.

The rata around the edge of the estuary is pretty well budded up . These trees are normally earlier and are quite reliable flowerers even when its a bust elsewhere . But last yr even they did not really flower .

The rata in the hills has some definite flower  buds on parts of some trees .

a few of the big trees appear to be covered in buds but I am not yet convinced they are not leaf buds .

I will have a clearer picture in another week .

What does that mean?I have seen it flower at Paringa but not O

It will not be an early year in Otira if it flowers at all.

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22 minutes ago, Bighands said:

What does that mean?I have seen it flower at Paringa but not O

It will not be an early year in Otira if it flowers at all.

I wonder if the coastal rata is the southern rata .

For some reason the rata trees on the edge of the inlet are much more reliable flowerers than the ones a few hundred meters back in the bush .

The giant trees in the bush are northern rata .

But there are hybrids and I get lost sorting them out .

I think otira would only have southern rata .

1st of nov two yrs ago it was obvious it was going to be a big yr .

Last yr it was obvious it was going to be a bust .

This yr I am still uncertain how big a yr it will be .

It could be late showing its flower buds , we have had so many cold strong winds .

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There’s probably a few drums still sitting in the shed from the last rata bloom....

we had just boxed up a thousand odd hives and the cyclone kindly removed 99% of the flowers for us.. good times, sweet memories.. chasing the dragon

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16 minutes ago, kaihoka said:

I wonder if the coastal rata is the southern rata .

For some reason the rata trees on the edge of the inlet are much more reliable flowerers than the ones a few hundred meters back in the bush .

The giant trees in the bush are northern rata .

But there are hybrids and I get lost sorting them out .

I think otira would only have southern rata .

1st of nov two yrs ago it was obvious it was going to be a big yr .

Last yr it was obvious it was going to be a bust .

This yr I am still uncertain how big a yr it will be .

It could be late showing its flower buds , we have had so many cold strong winds .

Definitely S.Rata at Paringa.I have never seen Rata flower so early as the last bloom.Normally move hives into Otira early February move out early March with 100kg of white honey if the hives are up to strength.

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Last big flower it started here and gradually moved down the coast .

I really hope it flowers well and the weather is nice .

My hives will really fill up on nice honey .

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Our northern rata at this end of the country usualy starts not long after christmas,

it is a fickle tree for bloom, some years good other years not so great.

A few other smaller vine species, flowering spring and autumn.

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11 minutes ago, kaihoka said:

 

I really hope it flowers well and the weather is nice .

My hives will really fill up on nice honey .

And hopefully not fill up with varroa trucked over the hill on the backs of Canterbees... 

I like gutsing down fresh Rata honey ..

I hope it blooms again this year, and look forward to your updates. 

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9 hours ago, Stoney said:

And hopefully not fill up with varroa trucked over the hill on the backs of Canterbees... 

I like gutsing down fresh Rata honey ..

I hope it blooms again this year, and look forward to your updates. 

Varroa , varroa .....

What the heck is that

The bees are looking sweet az

We is using Apitraz .

😘

My aunt Mable uses a staple,

Keeps her tummy nice and tight

Even though she lost the fight.

 

 

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43 minutes ago, jamesc said:

My aunt Mable uses a staple,

Keeps her tummy nice and tight

Even though she lost the fight.

Gravity won that fight with me yrs ago .

I would need a very big staple

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53 minutes ago, jamesc said:

Varroa , varroa .....

What the heck is that

The bees are looking sweet az

We is using Apitraz .

😘

 

 

 

Good to hear Jimmy, long as you got something in there that you can manage. 

Willows as good as done round here, 9 frames of brood filling the nests is the result as we hustle towards the dearth.. 

Wondering the quality of the honey in drums yet to be collected and the main flow yet to be endured keeps the fire in the belly alive... 

not long now till the bums in the night shift seat keeping the crane hydraulics warm in some of the most spectacular scenery on offer. 

Bring it on 

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Indeed ....  bring it on.

My photo diary from last year shows bees dead from starvation on Nov. 4. This is indeed the dirth period. We enter starvation alley as nine frames of brood hatch and expect Kai.

Thank goodness for sugar.

We was over in your neck of the woods today ......it was warm and sultry ..... as were the girls !

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1 hour ago, jamesc said:

Indeed ....  bring it on.

My photo diary from last year shows bees dead from starvation on Nov. 4. This is indeed the dirth period. We enter starvation alley as nine frames of brood hatch and expect Kai.

Thank goodness for sugar.

We was over in your neck of the woods today ......it was warm and sultry ..... as were the girls !

I worked bees north of the mighty Hurunui today where they are thumping on flowering Matagouri. 

Meanwhile the missus sends me a message to say my shed at home is under attack the bees had found a gap and took advantage all day til I got in at 730 to block them in to die. 

The nectar taps turned off here for sure. 

The odd bit of catsear poking its head up here and there.. 

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Matagouri flowering .....  different worlds. .. we don't have leaf yet . Looks like engine oil in the comb ..... but is high octane for growth.

You might need a fan in the shed ? Blows all the sweet air out and the bees get bored and go home.

 

We had a major robbing frenzy here one year. Had a Dutchman on extracting . Got too much for him and he packed up and went home ..... to Holland.

We put the fan in after that. Problem solved, as long as Da Missus remembers to switch it on at lunchtime ! 

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Really is interesting working with all the different teams in the different areas, the season starts so early up there compared.. the local matagouri is only just forming buds. 

 

 

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3 minutes ago, Stoney said:

Really is interesting working with all the different teams in the different areas, the season starts so early up there compared.. the local matagouri is only just forming buds. 

 

 

Do you guys ever move your hives to the coast for kamahi .

It has just started here .

What about quintinia I found another small tree in full flower covered in bees .

I know it tastes rubbish but it is a flow for the bees .

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2 minutes ago, kaihoka said:

Do you guys ever move your hives to the coast for kamahi .

It has just started here .

What about quintinia I found another small tree in full flower covered in bees .

I know it tastes rubbish but it is a flow for the bees .

We run permanent hives on the coast from south of Hoki to south of Fox Glacier. Only shifting more there in a Rata bloom. 

They draw beautiful wax for our east coast brood combs on the Kamahi. 

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Do we what ..... it's the biggest adventure of the year ..... the 'Raison d'etre' for us .

You can keep the Quitinia.

1 minute ago, Stoney said:

We run permanent hives on the coast from south of Hoki to south of Fox Glacier. Only shifting more there in a Rata bloom. 

They draw beautiful wax for our east coast brood combs on the Kamahi. 

I guess that's why we are Stoney's poor relation !

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5 minutes ago, jamesc said:

You can keep the Quitinia.

I am lucky that it finishes just as kamahi starts .

Bees have used it all up feeding babies.

I am really over our constant wind , me and the bees just hate it .

Feeling really let down by global warming again .

What I want is someone to tow the south island out of the 40s and up to about the kermadecs.

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17 minutes ago, jamesc said:

 

I guess that's why we are Stoney's poor relation !

They’re not my hives! ... 

this season has been some big changes for me.. 

I’m only a contractor these days.. almost stress free. 

 

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2 hours ago, kaihoka said:

Do you guys ever move your hives to the coast for kamahi .

It has just started here .

What about quintinia I found another small tree in full flower covered in bees .

I know it tastes rubbish but it is a flow for the bees .

Quintinia just started in from hoki. A few trees in flower but most just startin. My bees been all over the fuchsia last two weeks. Kamahi looks like its still asleep.

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7 hours ago, YTB8TA270 said:

Quintinia just started in from hoki. A few trees in flower but most just startin. My bees been all over the fuchsia last two weeks. Kamahi looks like its still asleep.

We start earlier here being further north.

A couple of yrs ago when I noticed the mass of buds on the rata here the big flowering worked its way south .

I wonder if that would happen every yr with the different species, kamahi , manuka etc.

Or would local conditions sometimes affect the flowering .

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@Kaihoka I would be very interested in your observations of the effects of Myrtle Rust on Rata.

We are in year 3 of this fungus invasion (it is just getting established) and if we get a warm wet summer the spread of Myrtle Rust maybe major.

You may ask where it has been observed - this map will help all beekeepers.

Open the map, tick the box and use the + key and mouse to highlight your area.

https://www.myrtlerust.org.nz/about-myrtle-rust/where-is-myrtle-rust/

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30 minutes ago, Don Mac said:

@Kaihoka I would be very interested in your observations of the effects of Myrtle Rust on Rata.

We are in year 3 of this fungus invasion (it is just getting established) and if we get a warm wet summer the spread of Myrtle Rust maybe major.

You may ask where it has been observed - this map will help all beekeepers.

Open the map, tick the box and use the + key and mouse to highlight your area.

https://www.myrtlerust.org.nz/about-myrtle-rust/where-is-myrtle-rust/

i have never seen any myrtle rust on the rata.

a couple of yrs ago a big rata looked very sick and defoliated but it was some type of rust and its all green leaf again now.

from what i have heard most of the myrtle rust in our area is on the lopomyrtus with a few pohutukawa.

i have never heard of any on rata, have you ?

what are the blue dots ? . there's one on my place.

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@Kaihoka the blue dots are observation of myrtacae plant observations.

The red dots are the ones where myrtle rust has been observed.

Southern rata (Metrosideros umbellātā) is the recognized parent species of pohutukawa (Metrosideros excelsa). Both are myrtle plants

https://www.doc.govt.nz/nature/native-plants/rata/

Yes Lophomyrtus species, Ramarama and Rahotu have shown the greatest susceptibility to Myrtle rust to date.

But all beekeepers should be keeping an observant eye for fungal infection by myrtle rust in economically important species such as manuka, kanuka, rata and pohutukawa

when out tending their hives.

You can learn all about myrtle rust here on this website - https://www.myrtlerust.org.nz/

 

 

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