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Beekeeping "Levy" Do we need one.


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I'm glad that NZ Beekeeping is working on details for a 3 year project with Mark Goodwin on nectar makers and honey following a talk MG gave at the Waikato Field Day (that I attended). That talk he gave seemed to completely undercut/undermine the other speakers looking at pollens; from my simple perspective.

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18 minutes ago, ChrisM said:

I'm glad that NZ Beekeeping is working on details for a 3 year project with Mark Goodwin on nectar makers and honey following a talk MG gave at the Waikato Field Day (that I attended). That talk he gave seemed to completely undercut/undermine the other speakers looking at pollens; from my simple perspective.


can you expand on that ?

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5 hours ago, morporks said:

 

"Sorry to say, it's now the beekeeper that has their hand out more than researchers"

 

Is that not a result of all the hype and gloss when the reality is that Beekeeping is hard work and depends on world markets,weather patterns and plants

Research will not bring the money back into over hyped industry

 

If you hit the 'quote' button at the end of a post, it will do the above (ie quote the post so you don't have to copy it out).

Now, where was I ?

Oh yes . . . you're missing my point. The call for help is not from researchers at the moment, it is from beekeepers who cant sell honey that used to have a market in being blended into "manuka". Nothing to do with hype and gloss, just stark reality now. And perhaps more stark for some than others who have seen this before

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7 hours ago, Dennis Crowley said:

 

 

Those are 2017 figures, not a lot of growth since that time, a lot of crops being swapped. Not all these crops need bees and apart from Kiwis, avos, vege seeds and apples, the rest have very small amounts of land area.  This is published each year by Plant and Food along with Hort NZ

Yeah I know - that’s where I got my figures and why I asked the question. The 2018 version is available on line.

 

kiwis, avocado, summer fruit, apples/pears, berry fruit, vege seeds and squash.

 

my second question regards contribution to agriculture - is it on the radar for apinz?

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On 21/10/2019 at 7:34 AM, Trevor Gillbanks said:

ApiNZ stated that the Levy was rejected because of the downturn of the industry. Our Survey Monkey results showed us that the vast majority of respondents wanted the Levy.  However, they voted against it because they did not want to be forced into joining and paying funds into ApiNZ

my view, it's a real shame that api-nz didn't acknowledge that the levy vote was effectively a vote against api-nz, and then figure out how to become an outfit that would have broad buy-in => which would be good for all.

Suspect it was about protecting reputations, especially as some in api-nz had sold the idea to politicians that they represented beekeepers. Only way to save face was to sell that story as the reason for the outcome of the levy vote, either that, or they genuinely believe that the api-nz factor had nothing to do with the outcome. Not sure which would be worse...

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The big one that isnt listed in the chart above is Clover as a Ruminant feed and Legume.

Legumes decrease our reliance on nitrogen fertilizers for pasture growth and provide important nutrition for Livestock.
Bees are the main pollinator of  White Clover 

 

 

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My memory is not as good as it once was ,but about the time varroa arrived I am pretty sure it was claimed that pasture pollination was valued in the billions of dollars per annum

 

I think that came from one of the govt depts at the time.

 

 

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Olbe and Philbee that’s why I asked the question - we keep hearing about this oft-quoted figure of $4-5B Contribution of bees to clover pollination and pastoral farming, but I’ve dug for the figures before and can’t find any detail of where this has come from or how it was calculated.

 

it is possible if it was looked at again, the actual contribution could now be much greater than this. Particularly if you factor in pressure coming on nitrogen fertiliser use.

 

Thats why I think it needs attention and it seems to me this would be a Sensible and worthwhile thing for apinz to spend their time and effort on.

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58 minutes ago, john berry said:

All research has potential benefits sometimes quite unexpected and I think we were much better off in the old days when we had scientists funded to do be research rather than scientist chasing funds for specific projects. Those days unfortunately at least for the time being are gone. How then can so much money be spent on pseudo scorpion research when  fairly extensive trials of already proven to be interesting but useless in any practical terms when the same amount of money spent on passion vine hopper parasites has the potential to save beekeepers millions of dollars a year and the wider horticultural industry tens of millions per year. Like any research there is no guarantees but with this there would be a very high chance of a least partial success.

In my experience (short stint on academic staff payroll in a university engineering faculty) a lot of research is guided by professors but carried out by less capable researchers. A lot of those researchers still have their training wheels on and everyone needs to get experience and a start somewhere. As a result a lot of research is carried out by idiots and is akin to getting a sonnet of shakespeare (if you have enough monkeys on typewriters). Similar to beekeeping really. In the days of the DSIR all manner of stupid stuff was done by propellor heads; in my opinion. However, in response to that we now have the current system where scientists (engineers, etc) don't do science, instead they spend all their time filling out applications for whatever might whet the appetite of committees that sit on the funds. I had a crack at one of those applications years ago and I disappointed at the outcome. Instead I was lured into the real world with dollars and experience. I truly believe the old system needed to change but as always, the pendulum has swung way too far in the other direction. So while I think overall it is better, it is certainly a long way short of something that we would consider to be good. So I don't disagree with you, but a lurch back into the past is not great either.

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35 minutes ago, Pinnacle said:

Olbe and Philbee that’s why I asked the question - we keep hearing about this oft-quoted figure of $4-5B Contribution of bees to clover pollination and pastoral farming, but I’ve dug for the figures before and can’t find any detail of where this has come from or how it was calculated.

 

it is possible if it was looked at again, the actual contribution could now be much greater than this. Particularly if you factor in pressure coming on nitrogen fertiliser use.

 

Thats why I think it needs attention and it seems to me this would be a Sensible and worthwhile thing for apinz to spend their time and effort on.

It wouldn't surprise me at all if New Zealand went from being a country where the Beekeepers are saying to various sources of capital, "We have a problem, what can you do to help us?"

To a country where the Beekeepers tell the Country, "You have a problem, what are you going to do about it ?" 

The preferred response by a Govt would likely be very  similar to the recent levy proposition, however it would be quickly pointed out that planning for that came off the back of a healthy growth curve which has since inverted.


Ive considered the probable improvement in Bee health that would follow a reduction in NZ Hive numbers  but have concluded that there are two stumbling blocks in this regard.

Firstly, our Hive numbers are likely to fall but in many cases what will change most significantly is Hive distribution, so it could be that in the context of overcrowding and the effects of this on Bee Health, nothing will change.
Secondly, even if it is argued that a reduction in Hive numbers will improve our Bee health and therefore reduce any urgency for extra research funding, it could be well argued that the future of NZ Beekeeping is likely to involve a lot of Hive movements which in effect could be similar to high Hive densities.
 

Its surprising how often the anecdotal connection is made in my sphere between Hive movement and Hive  ill health. 

Another  possible topic for study.

 

 

 

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1 minute ago, Maggie James said:

Interestingly over the years I have had various pollens show up on honey analysis, but never gorse

haha, yeah as soon as I hit <enter> I regretted prattling on about gorse.. As I don't actually sell any honey I've never had a single test done of pollens etc. But I'd be very surprised if bees didn't trapse around some gorse in my hives.

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5 minutes ago, Jacob said:

Although the plant is fairly prolific, it seems fairly rare to find the pollen in honey. Gorse pollen represents about 2% of the total pollen we've ever seen during pollen counts.

 

Hi Jacob - When you state pollen counts, is this on honey analysis or off a brood frame or from a pollen trap? 

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6 hours ago, Philbee said:

It wouldn't surprise me at all if New Zealand went from being a country where the Beekeepers are saying to various sources of capital, "We have a problem, what can you do to help us?"

To a country where the Beekeepers tell the Country, "You have a problem, what are you going to do about it ?" 

 

 

Worse Philbee, its becoming other countries telling us "you have a problem, fix it"  (nosemas in bees, AFB in honey, manuka in honey)

 

6 hours ago, Philbee said:


To a country where the Beekeepers tell the Country, "You have a problem, what are you going to do about it ?" 

 

 

 . . .and to which the country responds "well, what have you done about it to date? Oh, $300 million in exports but zero in industry funding? Back to splintered groups?"

With the answer of "yeah . . .nah"

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