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Don Mac

First Neonicotinoid soil survey data published

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Hi Beekeepers and interested readers.

The first survey ever of the effects of neonicotinoid pesticides has been published in NZ.

Imidacloprid was first registered as a seed treatment in 1992 and it has taken 27 years to research and publish environmental data on its fate in our soils.

You see  the EPA or MPI or growers do not do any monitoring or measuring of pesticides and their effects in the environment.

And this study by Dr Chris Pook (now working at the Liggins Institute) was only done because beekeepers said they could not keep their hives alive near maize growing areas immediately after harvest.

His study measured the levels of neonicotinoids in the soil. We do not know yet how this is connected to the death of the hive. More research needed - oh for a funding levy!

Some of this work was presented at an Apiculture Conference in Rotorua three years ago and at the EPA Hearing for APP202077. Now it has been published internationally unfortunately behind a pay wall. But the press release is attached.


https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0269749119301381?via%3Dihub

https://doi.org/10.1016/j.envpol.2019.113075

 

 

Press release - Chris Pook 2019 - Neonicotinoid residues in NZ maize field soil.docx

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Oh dears.

Our industry has a problem - still more worried about who does the work with the money - rather than look at the issue I wrote about.

5 words lamenting the fact we do not have funding for research for our industry. Look what it created. Sorry guys.

 

Looks like many of you folk have forgotten what a neonicotinoid looks like and what it does.

I would like to hear from those concerned about pesticide residues in our environment.........

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I do not  think there will be a shift away from neonic Until they find another chemical to replace it. 

 

 

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I wonder if it is beekeeper practise - lifting frames up from the brood box for gorse pollen to exhibit on analysis

The above comment isn't intended for this topic.

 

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On 21/10/2019 at 8:48 AM, Don Mac said:

Oh dears.

Our industry has a problem - still more worried about who does the work with the money - rather than look at the issue I wrote about.

5 words lamenting the fact we do not have funding for research for our industry. Look what it created. Sorry guys.

 

Looks like many of you folk have forgotten what a neonicotinoid looks like and what it does.

I would like to hear from those concerned about pesticide residues in our environment.........

Yo Mr Don Mac.....

 

I for one am very concerned about pesticide residue in our environment. 

When  I watch my neighbours trundling around their paddocks with the tractor and spray tank it turns my crank. My bees are on the other side of the road feeding on their dandelions.

We've had words .... but they forget too quickly.

I have an email full of memorandums from Ecan to get on top of my gorse ...... there is no doubt we can kill the weed, but at what cost ? 

I won't do the job myself  because I am writing myself an economy ticket to the grave in absorbing all that spray drift ..... so it's not really fair to get an employee to do the job ,right ?

We are in the dark ages of weed control.

 

There has to be a better way ....  perhaps use that gorse as a cover crop to grow Totara and Black beach and Kowhai  that used to cover these hills in the days of the Moa Hunters. 

Perhaps Shane Jones will come to our party .

 

 

I took in an interesting comment on the TV last night.

 

The comment was made by a women with a tie making business.  

"Sure" she said , " The business has it's ups and downs. The difference between a corporate and a family business is that the family business will carry the employees through the down turns and low spots". 

 Not sure what that has to do with pesticide and spray damage  ,  but it sort of ties in with the philosophy that we are all part of a homogenous puzzle, and for the puzzle to be completed it takes many shapes and colours to co exist , rather than having a clean sweep and monoculture ..... the weeds also have  a place in the big picture.

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We see the grapists gayly (is that a word @yesbut) spraying in the day time regular like. Wondering at how many beeses they are going to slaughter on any given day and keep driving into the hills until we are at least half an hour, and up to two from where they are! (We love picnics in the countryside!)

 

We’ve had one accidental spray mishap on a farm but those sites are a damn sight safer than all the spray on the flats. They call it “Flats Disease” I think of it as “Don’t give a “flying” for anything other than myself, and who needs bees for pollination!”

 

Change is slow in coming.

 

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4 minutes ago, Bron said:

We see the grapists gayly (is that a word @yesbut)

Yeah, sure...gaily :IMG_0386:

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All I have to contend with is the weather .

It can make life pretty difficult , but there is no malice in the natural world only indifference.

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All I have to put up with is 1080

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5 hours ago, Bighands said:

All I have to put up with is 1080

Then stop eating the carrots that you find lying around in the bush.

 

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10 minutes ago, Trevor Gillbanks said:

Then stop eating the carrots that you find lying around in the bush.

 

They are green not orange as per normal

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5 hours ago, Bighands said:

All I have to put up with is 1080

Do you still have possums eating your garden ?  We have not seen one for yrs .

But a month or two ago wekas came back after 30 yrs . I knew they were on the way .

It was probably not as bad as waiting for cane toads to arrive but they sure are destructive in the garden.

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21 minutes ago, Bighands said:

They are green not orange as per normal

Well, you do need greens as well as orange to have a nice mixed diet.

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Has there been testing in and around high density kiwifruit growing areas?

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2 hours ago, Craig said:

Has there been testing in and around high density kiwifruit growing areas?

@Craig no there has not been any testing around Kiwifruit orchards that I am aware of.

We do not have many complaints of bee losses from Kiwifruit areas, which we consider significant as a lot of hives are placed in these areas for pollination.

The other plus is that Zespri's spray programme excludes spraying during flowering which protects bees.

 

In NZ there is next to no monitoring and measuring of soils and subsurface ground water for pesticides and fertilizer residues.

The EPA has set Environmental Exposure limits for around 150 chemicals and only one is monitored, and that is 1080 in areas of application.

This why this study by Pook and Gritan is so important, the first conducted looking specifically at neonicotinoids in soils in areas where we know beekeepers loose hives.

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