Jump to content
Trevor Gillbanks

October 2019 Apiary Diary

Recommended Posts

Posted (edited)
On 8/10/2019 at 8:06 AM, Alastair said:

Wow still in singles no wonder they are starting to hang!!

 

Nice work on the queen cells how will you be using them?

I been adding 3 frames of brood and a cell to my  drone layers and failing queens, cells to my 7 frame smart nucs made with left over brood from my doubles that I'm pushing down and anything developing swarm cells and I have had to make a few splits with the extremely strong doubles so far iv used 40 cells in 4 days

Hives are starting to bubble now, 3 had cells and 1 already swarmed

IMG_20191008_112457-3120x2340.jpg

 

IMG_20191009_094737-2340x3120.jpg

Edited by Daley
Fixed double up in post
  • Like 6

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@Maru Hoani

  my attention is being drawn to the blue sky and dry ground with no puddles.

Has the weather been good for the manuka flowering .?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
22 hours ago, kaihoka said:

So if it was the winning ticket is it stuffed.

 

I have  another "emergency use" for those tickets that don't earn anything.

  • Haha 1
  • Spoon 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
19 minutes ago, Dennis Crowley said:

I have  another "emergency use" for those tickets that don't earn anything.

If you had the winning ticket you  probably  wouldnt  have many emergencies any more .

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
21 hours ago, Maru Hoani said:

I been adding 3 frames of brood and a cell to my  drone layers and failing queens, cells to my 7 frame smart nucs made with left over brood from my doubles that I'm pushing down and anything developing swarm cells and I have had to make a few splits with the extremely strong doubles so far iv used 40 cells in 4 days

Hives are starting to bubble now, 3 had cells and 1 already swarmed

IMG_20191008_112457-3120x2340.jpg

 

IMG_20191009_094737-2340x3120.jpg

That looks nice.

  • Agree 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
44 minutes ago, jamesc said:

That looks nice.

Yea, I saved a pallet of honey and I just put a few boxes on the back for when I find hungry hives with empty outside frames

22 hours ago, kaihoka said:

@Maru Hoani

  my attention is being drawn to the blue sky and dry ground with no puddles.

Has the weather been good for the manuka flowering .?

It's just flowering now which is a bit late, the ground was hard az and I was able to get to some of my worse sites this week up until today, now its wet again. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Maru Hoani said:

Yea, I saved a pallet of honey and I just put a few boxes on the back for when I find hungry hives with empty outside frames

please tell me your not feeding honey back to hives 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Maru Hoani said:

Yea, I saved a pallet of honey and I just put a few boxes on the back for when I find hungry hives with empty outside frames

It's just flowering now which is a bit late, the ground was hard az and I was able to get to some of my worse sites this week up until today, now its wet again. 

Not as wet as here .

We have only had 16mls but totals in hills are 80/ 100 mls

Do you ever get rain totals like that in 12 hr periods .

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Supered up my 6 mating nucs  today . I made them fairly strong with 3 out of 5 frames being brood or eggs. They are overflowing with young bees looking for a job to do. 

They were made up three and a half weeks ago. 

I checked them 9 days later and removed excess queen cells, leaving one per hive , and I shall leave them alone for another week , by which time there should be laying queens . 

 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
18 minutes ago, tristan said:

please tell me your not feeding honey back to hives 

With the price of Bush honey the way it is a large part of the industry is already using frames of honey as feed. As long as the hives are inspected when it comes off and apiaries don't have a disease history what is the problem?

Reusing wet honey boxes has the same risk as using frames of feed honey and heaps of us do that.

  • Agree 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
47 minutes ago, Jamo said:

 

Reusing wet honey boxes has the same risk as using frames of feed honey and heaps of us do that.

 

The risk of of a wet super might be the same as the risk of a harvested box of honey the difference is that if you are giving hives one or two frames from that box as feed you have the potential to infect 5-10 hives apposed to one infected wet going onto one hive.

  • Like 1
  • Agree 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, tristan said:

please tell me your not feeding honey back to hives 

I was waiting for someone to say this haha

 

I would say most beekeepers are doing this and many of them just don’t like to say so because it’s frowned upon.

I feed my own honey, I know where it came from, and I’ve been getting away with it all these years.

If it eventually comes back to bite me I’ll take it on the chin because it will be my own fault.

  • Like 5
  • Agree 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, frazzledfozzle said:

 

The risk of of a wet super might be the same as the risk of a harvested box of honey the difference is that if you are giving hives one or two frames from that box as feed you have the potential to infect 5-10 hives apposed to one infected wet going onto one hive.

What you say is correct however some extraction plants mix the frames up during extraction so the frames from one box might end up in maybe 3 different boxes so maybe not that much different.

The key thing here is thoroughly inspecting each hive when any hive component is taken away from it. 

Another thing I do to manage risk is labeling each pallet of wets with the site it came from so if spring inspections find an issue I can act accordingly with the boxes that came from that site.

  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 2/10/2019 at 7:07 PM, M4tt said:

I’ve ordered some Crimson Clover seed, enough to plant a crop of 0.4 ha as an experiment . I’ll plant at labour weekend and it should flower heavily in the summer . Apparently it’s a heavy nectar producer 

We used Crimson Clover on our road frontage last year and it has just started flowering again this spring, it has a lovely deep red flower. We have oversown the same area with Phacelia and white clover this year as well to mix it up a bit. Got a lot of funny looks and toots from the neighbours as we were out there with the rotary hoe last spring, sowing the long acre!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, milkandhoney said:

We used Crimson Clover on our road frontage last year and it has just started flowering again this spring, it has a lovely deep red flower. We have oversown the same area with Phacelia and white clover this year as well to mix it up a bit. Got a lot of funny looks and toots from the neighbours as we were out there with the rotary hoe last spring, sowing the long acre!

Excellent 😊. My little paddock is sprayed out and will get a light power Harrow on the 20th, followed by the seed . 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
19 hours ago, Jamo said:

With the price of Bush honey the way it is a large part of the industry is already using frames of honey as feed. As long as the hives are inspected when it comes off and apiaries don't have a disease history what is the problem?

Reusing wet honey boxes has the same risk as using frames of feed honey and heaps of us do that.

Bang on there Jamo, if there was an easy way to feed "your own AFB clean honey" from the drums I would be doing that as well. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
19 hours ago, Jamo said:

With the price of Bush honey the way it is a large part of the industry is already using frames of honey as feed. As long as the hives are inspected when it comes off and apiaries don't have a disease history what is the problem?

Reusing wet honey boxes has the same risk as using frames of feed honey and heaps of us do that.

 

feel free to ask @AFB PMP Management Agency their thoughts on it.

 

its a bad practise because its easy to slip up and cause a massive problem.

 

reusing wet honey boxes imho is a lesser risk. thats down to quantity of honey left in it. its very easy for bees to clean those boxes up and consume everything, and not feed it to the young which is where the afb infection takes place. thats with low level afb which may not have any symptoms, which is the most likely case of you missing it during inspection.. with high levels then the risk is the same.

if you need to feed honey, the easy way (which we did when honey dropped to $2/kg) is to simply leave it on the hive. that way your not spreading anything.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, tristan said:

if you need to feed honey, the easy way (which we did when honey dropped to $2/kg) is to simply leave it on the hive. that way your not spreading anything.

Your right, and obviously it’s less work, handling, and honey keeps better on the hive.

However it’s easy enough to miscalculate how much you need to leave with each winter varying.

And you can end up with a significant problem in spring if you leave too much honey on, it needs to come off and go somewhere, and it’s had varroa treatment.

What do you do? I wouldn’t want it mixed in with my new season crop.

 

This past season I paid to have all my honey extracted and thermalised so I have future proofed now.

 

But I had some honey from the season before which I’d extracted myself and jarred that had fermented in the jars, faced with the task of having to scrape it all out to waste into a hole, I chucked it in the feeders of some hungry hives and man it took all the work out of it, jars came out beautifully clean and minimum effort.

Would I do it again? No.

Would I recommend anyone else do it? No.

However I think the risk is fairly minimal knowing that none of the hives it came from have had AFB.

 

Personally I think it’s a much bigger risk buying secondhand gear and there’s no shortage of people that do that without being chastised.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, tristan said:

 

feel free to ask @AFB PMP Management Agency their thoughts on it.

 

its a bad practise because its easy to slip up and cause a massive problem.

 

reusing wet honey boxes imho is a lesser risk. thats down to quantity of honey left in it. its very easy for bees to clean those boxes up and consume everything, and not feed it to the young which is where the afb infection takes place. thats with low level afb which may not have any symptoms, which is the most likely case of you missing it during inspection.. with high levels then the risk is the same.

if you need to feed honey, the easy way (which we did when honey dropped to $2/kg) is to simply leave it on the hive. that way your not spreading anything.

For sure it is better to feed sugar and eliminate a potential afb transfer situation but I feel that it is unrealistic to expect beekeepers to do that when many honey types are not worth extracting but still might need taking off for shifting etc. Far better to emphasise the need to be thorough with inspections and traceability.

Regarding wets I have seen hives infected from wets extracted after a missed infected box where I can guarantee that all frames were put back in their own boxes. Considering this I would not underestimate the ability of wets to transfer afb.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, Jamo said:

Regarding wets I have seen hives infected from wets extracted after a missed infected box where I can guarantee that all frames were put back in their own boxes. Considering this I would not underestimate the ability of wets to transfer afb.

absolutely true. what i'm getting at is light infections do not always show symptoms so they are easily missed and that bees can clean up light infections.

where as if you give them frames of honey the odds of infection go way up even with a light infection.

 

7 minutes ago, Jamo said:

Far better to emphasise the need to be thorough with inspections and traceability.

the catch is inspections doesn't always find the light (or sub clinical) infections. so even with proper inspection you can be missing hives with afb.

inspections are never fool proof as you mention with the example of missed infected box.

traceability certainly helps but thats a big cost and usually only done if beek has a major afb problem.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Dennis Crowley said:

Bang on there Jamo, if there was an easy way to feed "your own AFB clean honey" from the drums I would be doing that as well. 

All we need is a few of those Homer Simpson glow sticks and we could rig up an inline honey sterilizing system in the extraction room.

6 minutes ago, tristan said:

 

inspections are never fool proof as you mention with the example of missed infected box

The inspection found the infected hive but the monkey on the truck didn't find all the boxes that came off that hive.

Like you said, nothing is 100% but we leant from the experience. Wrote about it here somewhere many moons ago.

  • Like 1
  • Good Info 1
  • Haha 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

if beeks keep short cutting things to much they made need one of those radiation units from oz to sterilize all the boxes.

if hives get dumped and you start getting mite bombs, then afb can hide in the background and get a foothold.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, tristan said:

if beeks keep short cutting things to much they made need one of those radiation units from oz to sterilize all the boxes.

if hives get dumped and you start getting mite bombs, then afb can hide in the background and get a foothold.

The future could be very interesting. Just have to hope that the mites get to the abandoned / missmanaged hives first.

  • Agree 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/10/2019 at 9:12 PM, tristan said:

please tell me your not feeding honey back to hives 

It's the only way to get none to low c4s in the manuka otherwise it ends up stacked in drums unable to sell,

my honey also comes from sites that have never had AFB that iv been running for over a decade and I uncap it so the bees will chew all or most of it out by the time honey starts coming in. Disease free is essential though and I still do complete brood checks to be sure. 

On 10/10/2019 at 10:29 PM, frazzledfozzle said:

 

The risk of of a wet super might be the same as the risk of a harvested box of honey the difference is that if you are giving hives one or two frames from that box as feed you have the potential to infect 5-10 hives apposed to one infected wet going onto one hive.

But in the extraction plant frames go in willy nilly, frames could be split up into 3 different boxes annually so if you have no disease history in a area then it's just as safe as putting a wet on

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Maru Hoani said:

my honey also comes from sites that have never had AFB

that doesn't mean they won't have AFB tomorrow. thats the catch.

it doesn't matter how good you are, as its the guys down the road that usually start the problem. however your practises can change it from a small problem to a big self inflicted problem.

 

2 hours ago, Maru Hoani said:

But in the extraction plant frames go in willy nilly, frames could be split up into 3 different boxes annually so if you have no disease history in a area then it's just as safe as putting a wet on

as i mentioned before i don't think thats quite true. its actually quite hard to infect a hive but feeding honey is an excellent way of doing it.

 

as jamo mentions the years ahead are going to be interesting to say the least. 

Edited by tristan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...