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Trevor Gillbanks

October 2019 Apiary Diary

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Don't tell DoC that.  Isn't that 60 per cent of Westland

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6 minutes ago, Maggie James said:

Flamin heck!  Well we know that many of us in the Mainland know that we live in the boondocks, but at least we are conversant with longitude/latitudinal readings!  Get with it pink pussy!

I spent some time in Edendale a while back and stayed at the Pub

I met some really great guys and we drank a power of piss.

Often the conversation would go like this, I...... went.....to......the .......north......... Island.........once.......on........,.a..........Rugby..........trip.
 

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10 minutes ago, tristan said:

500m can be the difference. sometimes its just the site. which direction does the wind hit it, how much sun etc.

the big thing is learning your sites and be prepared to things to be different. 

my early sites, which i've been doing for 15+ years which are always early, are way behind this year.

 

Yes the hives are generally struggling in this weather.  Everything is flowering as per normal but the weather is tough for the bees.  I was into a site yesterday that was getting quite hungry so had to go back today to top them up a bit.

3 minutes ago, Philbee said:

With regard James point about swarming, yes Im up against it and should be splitting splitting splitting only there is no way I could good matings although back on the 20 sept I through a frame of eggs in a drone layer and yesterday that hive had 2 frames of uncapped brood so as often happens the Virgins surprise us.

 

What is really a concern to me, not so much for me personally but more for others is that even although I didn't take any honey off last season, some of my Hives have very little to spare so as I go through them I imagine how much sugar would have been required to both get them through winter and Spring.

 

 

 

 

I've noticed that when thy have that honey available sometimes they'll get through it so they can grow quicker whereas if they had less to begin with they seem to be a bit more cautious with it.

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11 minutes ago, tristan said:

500m can be the difference. sometimes its just the site. which direction does the wind hit it, how much sun etc.

the big thing is learning your sites and be prepared to things to be different. 

my early sites, which i've been doing for 15+ years which are always early, are way behind this year.

Agreed . The site we put poly's into this year is a new one.  Mostly our queen mating sites are handy to home so we can keep an eye on them. 

The new site is out on a limb ..... but has consistently wintered nice hives and  given rise  to mated queens in trying conditions in years gone by

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7 minutes ago, Bighands said:

He is probably like me back in the dark ages

Don't tell Eugenie that.  I understand that you are 60 per cent DoC estate

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 per ce

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13 minutes ago, tristan said:

google it.

roughly halfway between auckland and whangerai.

Where the heck is Whangerai anyway ?

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2 minutes ago, Philbee said:

I spent some time in Edendale a while back and stayed at the Pub

I met some really great guys and we drank a power of piss.

Often the conversation would go like this, I...... went.....to......the .......north......... Island.........once.......on........,.a..........Rugby..........trip.
 

Uh Huh ...... I went  ..... to .... the North Island once ...... on a Bee Keeping  Adventure ...... It ended in a bowl of cus- turd ..... but I don't regret it for one minute.

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Meanwhile here in WhakaLeeston, populated by Ngati Leeston....where we produce more worldclass rugby players in the world, cos they eat export clover honey....

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19 minutes ago, Bighands said:

He is probably like me back in the dark ages

I see you are in Otira now Big Hands.

 

 

 

 

10 minutes ago, Maggie James said:

Meanwhile here in WhakaLeeston, populated by Ngati Leeston....where we produce more worldclass rugby players in the world, cos they eat export clover honey....

You on the gin tonite maggie .....😘

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1 hour ago, Bighands said:

It looks like rubbish on the coast and I see the quintina budding up

My bees have been flat out in my only obvious quintina for a couple of weeks .

It will have finished before kamahi starts .

Rata l here looks like another bust yr .

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5 minutes ago, jamesc said:

You on the gin tonite maggie

Can't afford gin, cos am hitting virgins in the neck!

 

Had a little quinnat salmon for tea that caught in June at Ohau, with a few veges out of the garden. 

 

Wouldn't mind a gin though!  Might launch into that next week.  Then I can think of some really purler comments.

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3 minutes ago, Maggie James said:

Can't afford gin, cos am hitting virgins in the neck!

 

Had a little quinnat salmon for tea that caught in June at Ohau, with a few veges out of the garden. 

 

Wouldn't mind a gin though!  Might launch into that next week.  Then I can think of some really purler comments.

No time like the present ....

Next few days look good for virgins ....

Edited by jamesc

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True Blue.  Seriously...more people need to think like that.  I sometimes wonder if it's something from a bygone era. 

2 minutes ago, jamesc said:

No time like the present ....

 

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I don't mean to be rude ..... but are You growing  a  pumpkin ?

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Not yet.  The proposed pumpkin patch has been replaced by a poly patch.  Could probably run to a courgette, strawberry or tomato

Perhaps you could have a P party - pumpkins, polys, parsnips, parsley

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2 minutes ago, Maggie James said:

True Blue.  Seriously...more people need to think like that.  I sometimes wonder if it's something from a bygone era. 

 

Possibly .

We are too caught up in High Viz and H&S and while compiling all the paper work miss the moment and the magic opportunity of spontaneity that gives rise to creation.

My first boy was like that. Spontaneuos creation.

Last night I heard him roaring done the road at 3.30 am on his motorbike.  Just rebuilt with the help of a mate. Loaded onto the trailer this morning in the predawn for the long trip north to the Pig Island for some daring deeds in the rugged hill country that only the Pig Island has.

6 minutes ago, Maggie James said:

Not yet.  The proposed pumpkin patch has been replaced by a poly patch.  Could probably run to a courgette, strawberry or tomato

Perhaps you could have a P party - pumpkins, polys, parsnips, parsley

Hmmm ..... P's a dirtyword these days .

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Sounds grand about son & heir.   Perhaps he can fill us in about aforementioned previous north island places that we have thrown our archaic topo maps out half a century ago and let us know where they are, so we can check them on google.  . 

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12 hours ago, kaihoka said:

Have you ever made pickled eggs .?

They are delicious.

 

No, I’ve made bacon egg pie a quiche for a late night and two minis for my mum. The neighbours on one side got a dozen & I’ll drop them another doz - they have 3 kids! The neighbour on the other side will get a doz then I can manage the rest. 

Too busy to think to hard at the moment.

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1 hour ago, Maggie James said:

Not yet.  The proposed pumpkin patch has been replaced by a poly patch.  Could probably run to a courgette, strawberry or tomato

Perhaps you could have a P party - pumpkins, polys, parsnips, parsley

 

1 hour ago, jamesc said:

Hmmm ..... P's a dirtyword these days .

 

Off for a week's R&R round the East Cape. Boy, some big country out there. Took the little Honda Fit on the Motu Road today. Let's just say The Wife wasn't too happy with the stream crossings or road in general. Car survived. So did we. Beautiful scenery.

 

Some very big apiaries in Opotiki, not sure what they are munching on as not a lot of visible flower.

 

As for the p's... my neighbour gave me some parsley which has come on nicely, parsnips we always struggle with, potatoes got hammered by the wind and rain two weeks ago but am nursing along the pumpkin which is the ticket to the Big Dance. All else fails, there is always the 2019 vintage Plum Wine which will get me through the door.

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2 hours ago, Bron said:

 

No, I’ve made bacon egg pie a quiche for a late night and two minis for my mum. The neighbours on one side got a dozen & I’ll drop them another doz - they have 3 kids! The neighbour on the other side will get a doz then I can manage the rest. 

Too busy to think to hard at the moment.

I am busy finding homes for my eggs too.

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Quote

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James - Are the polys full?  When do you make the polys up and put the cells out?  Do they stay on those hives or do you bring them back to a poly yard?

9 hours ago, Gwenyn Gwesty said:

2019 vintage Plum Wine which will get me through the door

That's a yes vote from me

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On 24/10/2019 at 6:44 AM, frazzledfozzle said:

@Philbee just wondering about your staple placement and whether you have changed it to the edge of the brood or do you still put them down the middle ?

 

Also do you leave the staples in during the winter or do they come out ?

In your experience can the staples increase the moisture in a hive over winter ?

A note here Frazzol

Its my observed opinion that a hive that becomes small and damp is a hive in which the Bees lack the energy to do the work required to control their environment.
The Bees are sick.
A similar thing applies to both larger and small  hives with high mite counts that dont respond to contact type treatment strips.
These hives are often very slow to show a significant mite drop and this in my opinion is due to the hive being lethargic from illness and therefore less active.
Less active hives dont spread the active ingredient around as effectively as a healthy Hive.

Some Beeks will use Formic on these lethargic Hives because Formic is self mobile.

 

These points are not just plucked from the air, they are the result of both experiments and   many anecdotes reported.

Further, healthy hives will withstand very high mite counts on a season by season basis.

For example the good Hive pictured on this thread had a mite count of 23 last Autumn, (04-04-19)
Typically a hive like that would be in big trouble 

I have other hives that had April mite counts at 60 and 80 and are fine now.

The key factor IMO is "Hive History" and not a point that we discuss enough.
 

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20 minutes ago, Philbee said:

A note here Frazzol

Its my observed opinion that a hive that becomes small and damp is a hive in which the Bees lack the energy to do the work required to control their environment.
The Bees are sick.
A similar thing applies to both larger and small  hives with high mite counts that dont respond to contact type treatment strips.
These hives are often very slow to show a significant mite drop and this in my opinion is due to the hive being lethargic from illness and therefore less active.
Less active hives dont spread the active ingredient around as effectively as a healthy Hive.

Some Beeks will use Formic on these lethargic Hives because Formic is self mobile.

 

These points are not just plucked from the air, they are the result of both experiments and   many anecdotes reported.

Further, healthy hives will withstand very high mite counts on a season by season basis.

For example the good Hive pictured on this thread had a mite count of 23 last Autumn, (04-04-19)
Typically a hive like that would be in big trouble 

I have other hives that had April mite counts at 60 and 80 and are fine now.

The key factor IMO is "Hive History" and not a point that we discuss enough.
 

In my observation. Hives in which Gibs were placed, in conjunction with protected cells March. Result was poor. 

In those hives, the Gibs became damp and wet with moisture. The damp environment created was caused by treatment. They were strong healthy hives prior.

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41 minutes ago, Gino de Graaf said:

In my observation. Hives in which Gibs were placed, in conjunction with protected cells March. Result was poor. 

In those hives, the Gibs became damp and wet with moisture. The damp environment created was caused by treatment. They were strong healthy hives prior.

Interesting as a report came in yesterday of a substantial trial in Canterbury where cells and OA/GL gibs were placed together and the  result was 70% matings.

 

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5 minutes ago, Philbee said:

Interesting as a report came in yesterday of a substantial trial in Canterbury where cells and OA/GL gibs were placed together and the  result was 70% matings.

 

Last season down here spring mating for me was fickle at best, this season despite plenty of cold wet days has been much better all while treated with staples, personally I’ve not seen any issues with mating while treatments are in. 

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