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October 2019 Apiary Diary


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Hopefully me. I’m having another baby 😅🤣

So, we went out into the wilds today to pick up a tipped over hive (blooming young cattle!) Came home with 60 eggs after talking to 3 people! Bacon & egg pie anyone? 😂

Three days since planting  and my Crimson clover is up   

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I have been held up with my bee work for nearly a week with family commitments and then bad weather. It's important to do bees at the right time and today I was a few days behind the eight ball. The hives had had a exceptional willow flow and were basically just too full of honey and needed a box. Fortunately only two or three were raising cells in each apiary but it was still hard work. Yesterday I had a hive that was crammed in the second box but not in the bottom box at all so I swap the two boxes. Some beekeepers do this with every hive every year. This is probably the first time I have done this to a hive in five years. I also had a strong hive with a queen that had suddenly gone bad with a terrible brood pattern . I didn't have time to look through two boxes of bees to find her so I just put a hatching swarm cell in to try and induce supersedure. I know I have said never use swarm cells but these hives will be re-queened in the autumn anyway and anything will be better than the Queen that is in there at the moment.

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9 hours ago, yesbut said:

What we need is an ultrasonic machine a bit like one of the old plastic welders that can  blast  exactly the right frequency at a hive that'll disintegrate mites but leave bees and most of the brood intact...

Look what I found....

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/330272487_The_Use_of_Airborne_Ultrasound_for_Varroa_Destructor_Mite_Control_in_Beehives

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8 minutes ago, yesbut said:

The treatment would need to be repeated over life cycle of varroa  to clear the brood .

Does it kill the varroa or just stun them .

How does treatment affect brood , it does not mention that .

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49 minutes ago, yesbut said:

None of the above you loofers. It's the wind. The Q can't manage the wind.

had one the other day. saw the bees doing there swarm dance and when it settled down came across a swarm on the ground.

put it in a box, trapped the queen in but all the bees went home. found the in the grass, queen was old and the short flight probably stuffed her.

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Has anyone seen a “pre swarm” indicator where the bees swarm out of the hive - cluster close to hive then all move back to the hive?     I know it’s happened on some of my hives and  I can go through hive and sort out swarm cells.

i have arrived to a hive to have bees completely covering the outside of 3 box hive.   I figure the Queen had chosen not to depart (yet) so the bees come back to the hive. 

 

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2 hours ago, Bees said:

Has anyone seen a “pre swarm” indicator where the bees swarm out of the hive - cluster close to hive then all move back to the hive?     I know it’s happened on some of my hives and  I can go through hive and sort out swarm cells.

i have arrived to a hive to have bees completely covering the outside of 3 box hive.   I figure the Queen had chosen not to depart (yet) so the bees come back to the hive. 

 

Yes. They are practising for the following day or so to really go 

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Checked the girls yesterday.  For the 1st time in a couple of years I have 4 hives at different points, which is great for learning.
I had an over wintered nuc that is now 2xfd with 1 super and has pretty much drawn them out fully, and will need another box once I buy one.
One that had I swapped boxes around last week has done the trick and is now needing another box. Another over wintered nuc is slowly building up, at a lot slower pace than the other's.

And my oldest hive has a failed queen and looks pretty crap actually. Getting a new mated queen in a couple of weeks, possibly should put a frame of brood in it from another hive. But unsure if I really want to be swapping frames around this season.

 

I have to say, things start making a lot more sence once your into your 3rd season, and you have 3 or so hives. Its makes it so much easier to spot when things are off, and when things are going really well.

 

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5 minutes ago, BRB said:

But unsure if I really want to be swapping frames around this season.

 

Why not?

Id take a really good frame of Bees with eggs from a good hive and insert it into the poor one.
kill old queen a few days prior though.

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3 minutes ago, Philbee said:

Why not?

Id take a really good frame of Bees with eggs from a good hive and insert it into the poor one.
kill old queen a few days prior though.

I've  burnt 2 hives this year.
I cant afford to burn any more. I've been checking them each time I open them now. I'm just a little risk adverse. I keep pretty good records of what came off what.
I'll look at them next weekend and decide if I think the risk is worth it.

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Just now, BRB said:

I've  burnt 2 hives this year.
I cant afford to burn any more. I've been checking them each time I open them now. I'm just a little risk adverse. I keep pretty good records of what came off what.
I'll look at them next weekend and decide if I think the risk is worth it.

Oh

That does complicate things a little

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We are always swapping frames ..... strong to weak ..... pulling brood for nucs ...... pulling honey and honey frames going everywhere the following year. But I tell yah what, we rarely kill a queen unless sh'e s old and doddery with no wings.

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1 hour ago, jamesc said:

We are always swapping frames ..... strong to weak ..... pulling brood for nucs ...... pulling honey and honey frames going everywhere the following year. But I tell yah what, we rarely kill a queen unless sh'e s old and doddery with no wings.

 

Same here, there is usually a use for a Queen on the way out, get a nuc started with her, then give her the chop a bit later and put a cell in for example.

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Taranaki/Wanganui? Far to many from out of town/region and then there is the big C stuffing it for everyone on top of it all. I see another clown has just put another couple of hundred on the Wanganui city boundary. Save us!

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6 minutes ago, Ali said:

Taranaki/Wanganui? Far to many from out of town/region and then there is the big C stuffing it for everyone on top of it all. I see another clown has just put another couple of hundred on the Wanganui city boundary. Save us!

I imagine some would would be doing “the long way round” trips with the Parapara’s being damaged. Maybe someone has brought them closer to home because of the extra travel involved?

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On 20/10/2019 at 9:58 AM, BRB said:

Yes it does.

All the hives are clear each week I check them. But you never know.  I need a week to think about it.

 


don’t we have an AFB dog somewhere in Canterbury? Maybe it would be worthwhile to get them in, and hopefully relieve any anxiety of further bonfires. 

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3 hours ago, Josh said:


don’t we have an AFB dog somewhere in Canterbury? Maybe it would be worthwhile to get them in, and hopefully relieve any anxiety of further bonfires. 

If you need some AFB detection work done you need to email Richelle at  queenbee@farmside.co.nz  .  Two dogs doing the traps at the moment.

B915CEFB-3B40-4BBF-BE0C-18EB9A116238.jpeg

The first of the queen cells  go out today .....with a very short window of opportunity for mating on the w/e .....

We've organised a nice sheltered yard with  eighty or so dead hives . The polys will go down on to the tin lids , get strapped on  to stop them blowing away and  will hopefully benefit from the heat bouncing back off the lids.   Good mating seems to be proportional to the heat inside the hive ..... 

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