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john berry

Oversupply of propolis

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The big C has just imported 20 ton of propolis from overseas. 

Product is available locally and while it might be dearer it does not carry the very high disease risk that comes with importing bee products.

Bees are very attracted to secondhand propolis and it absolutely can cause AFB infections . I don't know it's risks for EFB and viruses but I think it's time somebody found out. If I tried to bring in a used hive tool I would rightly be stopped by bio security (I hope) but 20 tons of infected material is fine apparently.

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How do they get away with that? Or is it because the authorities do not read this forum?

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Surely this cant be legal?!?! Would love to see that lot go up in smoke. Chinese?

 

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Absolutely legal unfortunately along with the importation of Royal jelly. Legal but ethically doubtful and a bio security nightmare. If importing companies had to carry the costs of their own bio security breaches they would not be so quick to import this type of product.

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The big C living up to their name.

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Has it not been irradiated ? 

 

I hope it’s not raw . Perhaps because we already have AFB , the importers feel they are not bringing in anything new.

 

Interesting  topic of conversation . Where did it come from?

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1 hour ago, john berry said:

The big C has just imported 20 ton of propolis from overseas. 

Product is available locally and while it might be dearer it does not carry the very high disease risk that comes with importing bee products.

Bees are very attracted to secondhand propolis and it absolutely can cause AFB infections . I don't know it's risks for EFB and viruses but I think it's time somebody found out. If I tried to bring in a used hive tool I would rightly be stopped by bio security (I hope) but 20 tons of infected material is fine apparently.

It's hard to support a company that firstly is willing to put the whole industry at risk and secondly is not supporting the local beekeepers at a time when they really need it.

Kind of shows how much they truly value their hives or anyone else's

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So a corporate beekeeping company that runs at a loss got the green light to import a bee product from overseas great system nz has towards bio security how long before they are givin the green light for antibiotics , beekeeping is hard enuff without these jerks 

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Think it's been coming in for years. Remember C bought a propolis company in South America. It's diluted in alcohol or similar, that's what I have been told. Must be a lot cheaper eh. And large companies do not have moral/values - return to shareholders is their mandate. 

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Precisely @Gino de Graaf every body that's supports comvita support these imports which puts us all at risk what other products are they importing? We need to stop supporting this practise why import a product nz produces?

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off the topic a little, but how is propolis refined? I gather that it is dissolved in alcohol. How easily does this dissolve do you need pure alchol or will Smirnoff do? Does this take hours or days how do you know when it is all dissolved? Once it is dissolved does it get put through a still to try to recover the alcohol and leave pure propolis? At that point how it is it tested? Are there tests for Propolis or just tests to see if there are contaminents like varroa treatments? In what form is it sold to the international market? What is a commercial quantity? What final product is it mostly used for? Is this the sort of thing the co-op might engage in, a Tatua Dairy style move to take the propolis to the final product instead of just on-selling the raw product with no value added.. I'd take the same stance on Grappa con Miele, Mead and boot leather preservative, researching into products that are value added. What about some kind of fancy baking sugar made from honey instead of cane sugar? it would be very expensive, but people regard honey differently to the 'white death'.

 

These are areas where Tatua gave Fonterra a lesson about smarter not bigger. I don't know if Tatua still is going well, but I hope they are because I think everyone likes that kind of story. I can see why others poor scorn on the co-op idea just selling honey that won't sell into a market that won't buy can't magically help much. But with the brakes on propolis too, it seems logical have a think about making honey and propolis lozenges. Sliding into the cess pit of rumour, I heard that Arataki were not buying propolis either. Is this because they were on-selling it to the big C and the big C stopped buying it from them? Where does/did the propolis from Arataki go? Is it too rude to ask? We can pour a bit of hate on the Big C, but I tasted some of their olive extracts from ingredients imported from AUS and I have to say they're doing their best to invent and promote interesting value added products including various lozenges and elixirs. I don't know who else is doing stuff like they are,  and clearly they aren't printing money right now either, but good on them for trying. Meanwhile nobody offered to buy propolis at half price or quarter price; instead the market just froze and not just the Big C? Seems quite an odd and strange development what else exactly is going on?

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I am sure that any propolis would be coming in under an import health standard.

Unfortunately import health standards failed to protect the dairy and beef Industary from m bovis or the kiwi fruit Industary from psa. 

Mpi seam very relaxed about putting the whole nz agricultural and hort industries   at risk for the sake of a deal which benefits a select few.

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Dehydrated honey powder is already produced by at least one factory for local bulk food use where a dry powder is easier to measure and manipulate than honey. Once the 20kg (?) bag is opened it has to be used almost immediately.

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Pollen is another bee product that is imported into nz in bulk ..( 40ft containers full) I have been told first hand of how incredible it is to see a container full of perfectly mono coloured pollen unlike our locally produced mixed floral source ‘real’ multi coloured pollen. 

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I reckon beekeepers scraped a bit more propolis than usual over last season. My usual buyer- not a big company - said no thanks.... Losing market share to the bigger players. 

My new buyer, MH, said yes. And now waiting.... For a while.... And lately heard rumors.... Slow money. 

The importation is a problem. We don't need it, but it's entirely legal. 

 

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4 hours ago, Gino de Graaf said:

Think it's been coming in for years. Remember C bought a propolis company in South America. It's diluted in alcohol or similar, that's what I have been told. Must be a lot cheaper eh. And large companies do not have moral/values - return to shareholders is their mandate. 

Yep has been coming in for years from Sth America.  Whilst I don’t necessarily support the importation I can see why they have gone down this track (and the same applies to their interest in Aussie Manuka honey).  They invested a lot in growing the markets for both these products over many years and were eventually so successful that they simply couldn’t source enough raw product locally to meet the demand so had to look at other supply options to satisfy demand.  

2 hours ago, Nuc_man said:

Precisely @Gino de Graaf every body that's supports comvita support these imports which puts us all at risk what other products are they importing? We need to stop supporting this practise why import a product nz produces?

Because NZ doesn’t produce enough to meet the market requirements.  Comvita tried very hard to encourage all beekeepers to use propolis mats but uptake was slow because they were making so much money from honey they literally couldn’t be bothered.

8 hours ago, Jamo said:

It's hard to support a company that firstly is willing to put the whole industry at risk and secondly is not supporting the local beekeepers at a time when they really need it.

Kind of shows how much they truly value their hives or anyone else's

To be fair - the reason they are importing (and have done for years)is because NZ Beekeepers didnt support them so they had to look elsewhere.  

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9 hours ago, john berry said:

The big C has just imported 20 ton of propolis from overseas. 

Product is available locally and while it might be dearer it does not carry the very high disease risk that comes with importing bee products.

Bees are very attracted to secondhand propolis and it absolutely can cause AFB infections . I don't know it's risks for EFB and viruses but I think it's time somebody found out. If I tried to bring in a used hive tool I would rightly be stopped by bio security (I hope) but 20 tons of infected material is fine apparently.

sooner that company goes bankrupt the better. Wanting to import honey, importing propolis, buying into selling aussie honey as manuka, etc, etc. Thank goodness the levy didn't go through, they'd then control the beekeeping lobby too

 

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3 minutes ago, tommy dave said:

Thank goodness the levy didn't go through, they'd then control the beekeeping lobby too

How so???

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21 minutes ago, Ted said:

How so???

votes on use/spend were going to be based on hives/production.

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9 minutes ago, tommy dave said:

votes on use/spend were going to be based on hives/production.

Not sure that would have lead them to control the spend.  Plenty of operations with as many/more hives and production than them.

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33 minutes ago, tommy dave said:

sooner that company goes bankrupt the better. Wanting to import honey, importing propolis, buying into selling aussie honey as manuka, etc, etc. Thank goodness the levy didn't go through, they'd then control the beekeeping lobby too

 

We should remember that they have done a lot of good for the industry by getting honey into high value markets and building the nz honey "brand".

However importing propolis and potentially risking the health of the countries bees while there is plenty of local propolis won't be making them any friends.

 

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1 minute ago, Jamo said:

We should remember that they have done a lot of good for the industry by getting honey into high value markets and building the nz honey "brand".

However importing propolis and potentially risking the health of the countries bees while there is plenty of local propolis won't be making them any friends.

 

There wasn’t/isn’t  plenty of propolis - that’s the point.  That’s why they were forced to look elsewhere.  Remember, these importations have been going on for years.

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8 hours ago, Ted said:

There wasn’t/isn’t  plenty of propolis - that’s the point.  That’s why they were forced to look elsewhere.  Remember, these importations have been going on for years.

My belief--plenty of propolis at the present time. Wouldn't surprise me if buyers were stockpiling over the past few years. And now don't need too much, hence the slow down. Bit like honey and wax stocks. It's always like this, demand, price up, oversupply, drop/level. 

Hives anyone?? 

Avos are doing this now. Great prices last few years, lots of plantings, increases supply and now pretty average return. 

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13 hours ago, yesbut said:

Dehydrated honey powder is already produced by at least one factory for local bulk food use where a dry powder is easier to measure and manipulate than honey. Once the 20kg (?) bag is opened it has to be used almost immediately.

The process used to dehydrate Honey is probably the same as the one used to dry milk powder (spray drier)
The temps required are well above what Honey should be heated to.

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17 hours ago, Ted said:

Not sure that would have lead them to control the spend.  Plenty of operations with as many/more hives and production than them.

That would make an interesting list!

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