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wuxal amino

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anyone know anything about wuxal amino? @Don Mac @Dave Black 

an orchard we have hives in got sprayed with it over the weekend and today a lot of the hives look like they are missing a lot of field bees.

it may be something else, a lot of stuff gets sprayed around that area plus the cold wet weather can hammer them a bit.

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Not much. It's a foliar fert and any problem is likely due to the surficants it contains; by its own account, very effective ones.

Needless to say, spraying bees with a surficants is pretty dumb.

Because it's not a pesticide, and not toxic, I'd doubt there is much in the way of warnings or controls that apply, but @Don Mac

 may know more.

 

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Uh Huh ..... same old story.

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Hi Tristan, sorry to hear about your loss of bees.

Wuxal Amino falls into the 'mystery mixture products'......because liquid fertilizer products and surfactants are not regulated by the EPA.

And that really frustrates me as it should frustrate you. Complain to your local MP.

@Dave Black is dead right it is a foliar fert, applied as a biostimulant to fruit trees and vines. https://horticentre.co.nz/wp-content/uploads/Technical Sheets/Wuxal Amino.pdf

What exactly is the composition of the product is a mystery. The SDS states the following;

Preparation:Liquid hydrolysate of amino acid Description:Aqueous solution of amino acid hydrolysate. Amino acids and peptides obtained by enzymatic hydrolysis  Reference -  https://horticentre.co.nz/wp-content/uploads/Safety Datasheets/Wuxal Amino SDS.pdf

The SDS states it is non hazardous in the environment (see Section 12).

But we know if the surfactant properties claimed on this tech bulletin, it is most likely to knock down foraging bees.

https://horticentre.co.nz/wp-content/uploads/Technical Sheets/Wuxal Amino.pdf

Note there are two products, another called Wuxal Aminoplant https://horticentre.co.nz/wp-content/uploads/Safety Datasheets/Wuxal Aminoplant SDS.pdf You will note that this

 

What can you do;

  1. Please communicate with the orchard manager/ owner and tell him of your bee loss.
  2. Ask him nicely if he can find out if the product has been tested for bee safety? Find out if additional products (stickers, penetrants were added to the spray tank).
  3. Ask him to get his supplier representative to contact you to discuss. Horticentre should be using a stronger standard of technical bulletin. If you have no luck, I will drop in and see them at Head Office which is nearby.
  4. Report the incident to the EPA _ pollinator incidents report form;  https://www.epa.govt.nz/everyday-environment/animals-and-insects/bees/pollinator-incident-report-form/ Tell them that the SDS suggests it is non hazardous in the environment, and ask them to investigate the SDS claim.

Doing nothing is not helpful to many other beekeepers or for us with respect to our dealings with the regulator.

We are meeting the EPA next week, so report it now, and I will raise it with them.

 

Thank you for informing us of this incident. Every bit of info of an adverse event is very helpful.

DonMac

 

PS to prevent future incidents happening give the orchard owner and the Wuxal representative one of these brochures -  simple spraying rules to protect honey bees.

http://agcarm.co.nz/wp-content/uploads/Bee-Tri-Fold-Brochure-web.pdf

 

Edited by Don Mac
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Why are these people spraying during the day with bees in the orchard 🤦‍♀️

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2 hours ago, Daley said:

Why are these people spraying during the day with bees in the orchard 🤦‍♀️

 

Happens all the time @Daley

countless hives have been poisoned in pollination over the years.

Some growers don’t really seem to care about the welfare of the bees as long as their crop is pollinated the rest doesn’t concern them. 

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7 minutes ago, frazzledfozzle said:

 

Happens all the time @Daley

countless hives have been poisoned in pollination over the years.

Some growers don’t really seem to care about the welfare of the bees as long as their crop is pollinated the rest doesn’t concern them. 

Crazy eh. Kill all the flying bees = no pollination 🤦‍♀️

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There is a lot less poisoning in apple orchards than there used to be. Bees however are frequently hit by spray and killed especially when there is a surfactant involved. It is beyond comprehension that surfactants are not listed as deadly to bees and as I have mentioned many times before organo- silicate surfactants are toxic in their own right whether wet or  dry. Another issue is the fact that these sprays can end up back in the hive and eventually show up in Honey testing. I don't miss the long nights and worry.

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7 hours ago, Daley said:

Why are these people spraying during the day with bees in the orchard 🤦‍♀️

because its fert and fert doesn't kill bees.

 

got a message back from the head worker, basically its the same stuff they have been using for quite some time.

having said that the hives have been in bad shape for some time. the catch is, while i have a long history with that orchard, i havn't been working that orchard much since the new owner took over. so its hard to tell what is staff induced failure or orchard induced failure.

it also can be a cause of perfect storm. spring weather is typically poor, however its been quite good lately especially that day when the spraying was done. add to that the orchard flowers have just started. quite possible its a case of flowers have just opened in the good weather at the same time they sprayed.

add to that is foraging range, the bigger hives are most likely working outside of the orchard so they are not badly effected and recover quickly. while the weaker hives work closer the hives and have little ability to recover. 

 

compared to years ago spraying is generally much better. most do it at night, however some complaints about safety(?) may mean thats no longer done.

however some orchards don't care one bit and will spray Lorsban while we are working the hives.

 

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1 hour ago, tristan said:

compared to years ago spraying is generally much better. most do it at night, however some complaints about safety(?) may mean thats no longer done.

however some orchards don't care one bit and will spray Lorsban while we are working the hives.

 

Do you think that growers may have some idea about the crisis in beekeeping and will be less contentious about spraying , knowing there will plenty beeks out there keen to do  pollination ?

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38 minutes ago, kaihoka said:

Do you think that growers may have some idea about the crisis in beekeeping and will be less contentious about spraying , knowing there will plenty beeks out there keen to do  pollination ?

It’s not just orchardists. Flowering paddocks get boomsprayed with products with surfactants added from now on for cropping . There is not reason for them to think about bees doing their thing . It does not enter their minds . Particularly so if the hives are not on that property 

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49 minutes ago, kaihoka said:

Do you think that growers may have some idea about the crisis in beekeeping and will be less contentious about spraying , knowing there will plenty beeks out there keen to do  pollination ?

no.

i think most issues are usually from those that spray to fit into their schedule and as long as their pollination gets done well enough, thats job done. the orchard and their budget comes first. hives are secondary.

most of the orchards we deal with are very good and usually do anything they can to help.

 

its been a concern that orchards might try to drive down the prices etc but i think as long as they are happy with your service and price fits their budget, then its all good.

the only times we have had issues is with those whose orchards are failing.

 

edit: keep in mind our pollination clashes with manuka and early season honey. its common to loose money doing pollination.

Edited by tristan
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@tristan   Can you please contact me.  Ph 021336580

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3 hours ago, tristan said:

because its fert and fert doesn't kill bees.

 

got a message back from the head worker, basically its the same stuff they have been using for quite some time.

having said that the hives have been in bad shape for some time. the catch is, while i have a long history with that orchard, i havn't been working that orchard much since the new owner took over. so its hard to tell what is staff induced failure or orchard induced failure.

it also can be a cause of perfect storm. spring weather is typically poor, however its been quite good lately especially that day when the spraying was done. add to that the orchard flowers have just started. quite possible its a case of flowers have just opened in the good weather at the same time they sprayed.

add to that is foraging range, the bigger hives are most likely working outside of the orchard so they are not badly effected and recover quickly. while the weaker hives work closer the hives and have little ability to recover. 

 

compared to years ago spraying is generally much better. most do it at night, however some complaints about safety(?) may mean thats no longer done.

however some orchards don't care one bit and will spray Lorsban while we are working the hives.

 

I would be pretty peeved if I saw someone spraying an orchard I was in during the day, especially if they were spraying flowers. I don’t care what it is.

 

But yes most people are really good and well aware of bees and other insects, especially those who depend on them for pollination.

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I had a very good phone call with Tristan last night and the supplier of Wuxal Amino, Horticentre has been in touch with me.

So we have some more unanswered questions.....so Monday will be very busy.

 

 

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Hi folks, I want to update those following this thread of where we are at with this bee kill.

We have learnt that the spray tank contained a mixture of Wuxal Amino + Spreadwet 1000 + some foliar minerals. It is not a single component mixture.

The avocados were sprayed during the middle of the day.

 

There are two possible causes to the loss of bees.

1) Nosema ceranae.

As a possible cause it fits because there are no dead bees in or around the hives. The bees normally abscond when they leave the hive leaving a queen and a cadre of bees. We can diagnose bee samples for Nosema ceranae. It has been an identified problem around east cape this early spring I am told.

Tristan I believe has not had a bee sample diagnosed so I cannot discard this possible cause. But he has told me the hives removed from the site to a new location and beginning to show signs of rejuvenation - 'they are gathering strength'.

 

2) The spraying of foraging bees whilst the avocados were flowering with the spray mixture detailed above. I have tried to make contact with all involved.

  • Horticentre is the importer and distributor of Wuxal Amino. They have spoken to me twice since I contacted them initially. They said they have never had a problem with any bee kills with Wuxal products which are foliar nutrient products. The German manufacturer was in the country last week and he reported no evidence of beekills. But they admitted they have no testing data - that is they have not tested the product to the accepted international OECD standards for bee safety as a minimum requirement.             And secondly they have no data on bee safety when their product is used in a tank mixture. Horticentre did express concern that this happened. Hopefully they will put a warning on the label to not spray during flowering.
  • SST New Zealand is the importer and distributor of Spreadwet 1000 mostly consisting of Poly(oxy-1,2-ethanediyl), alpha-(4-nonylphenyl)-omega-hydroxy-, branched.              I have emailed them, outlined the problem, but to date they have not bothered to reply. SST NZ is related to SST Australia and is a specialty chemical supplier of spray tank adjuvants such as surfactants and penetrants. There is no evidence of any ecotoxicological data or bee safety information on their Safety Data Sheet for Spreadwet 1000 despite the product having these hazardous properties;  acutely toxic 6.1E, Irritating to the skin 6.3A, Substance that is corrosive to ocular tissue 8.3A etc. Toxic to aquatic life 9.1D and harmful for terrestrial vertebrates 9.3C.   Note the HSNO Classification.   http://www.sstnewzealand.co.nz/cms/content/uploads/2017/05/X01E8_SPREADWET-1000-NZ_NEW-ZEALAND.pdf    My experience is that these guys will have no testing on honey bees as per OECD guidelines and they will avoid the discussion when challenged. They will tell you surfactants are safe, but they all hazardous in some way - see the hazard classification for Spreadwet 1000.
  • I have gathered no information on the mineral products added to the spray tank. Mineral products used as foliar nutrient products are not regulated by the EPA or MPI - so it is a cowboy market (like surfactants). Until these products are regulated like pesticides we are still going to experience problems.

At the moment we do have a problem as we cannot do an assay of dead bees to determine the effects of foliar nutrient products and surfactants. Testing with a pesticide screen can identify up to 250 different products, but these screens do not cover these specific products. 

If we cannot analyze it is almost impossible to make a determination of what killed our bees.

 

I want to thank Tristan's efforts, especially when he is presently flat out in the busiest time of the year.

I believe he has reported this as a pollinator incident to the EPA which should always be done.

 

If you are involved in pollination of major crops at this time of the year, I recommend maintaining good communication especially during flowering with the orchard owner or manager. Do share with them the details of The Bee Protection programme a joint effort by AgCARM and Apiculture NZ - brochures available from the Api NZ office.

http://agcarm.co.nz/wp-content/uploads/Bee-Tri-Fold-Brochure-web.pdf

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Thanks @Don Mac I am sure you have got a lot of people taking some notice of this and the procedures that have been followed.

 

Once again.  Wonderful work.  Thanks

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1 hour ago, Don Mac said:

Tristan I believe has not had a bee sample diagnosed so I cannot discard this possible cause. But he has told me the hives removed from the site to a new location and beginning to show signs of rejuvenation - 'they are gathering strength'.

 

correction on that.

they are still there and have bounced back so well you cannot tell that they had ever lost any bees other than they are not building up as fast as other hives.

 

my thoughts are that the issue has been hidden due to hives being fed (so lack of pollen and nectar coming in is not reducing brood laying) and especially strong hives running lots of brood, hives recover a bit before we get back.

combine that with the orchard being looked after by different staff members things get missed. especially if it just looks like a slow hives which is not uncommon in turbulent spring.

i hope i will get to talk to some of the orchard owners/staff, especially some that are highly regarded in the avo scene. however extraction has kicked off already and things are rather busy.

 

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