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Bit nippy for a pumpkin


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3 hours ago, Gwenyn Gwesty said:

We like them, but haven't grown any other types so can't compare them. It's a McGregor's Whangaparaoa Crown "Probably the most popular variety in NZ" according to their own blur

Thank you .

Those seeds were the ones I ended up getting

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My wife buys them and she blends them up with other fruit.  If I arrive home and I'm really really really thirsty, I'll brave having a glass or two.  Some after-taste.  I tell the kids its called Betr

Not even seeds Thats ridiculous , if they did not buy them before what makes people think they will know what to do with them now . It will just be a big waste of seeds . People are all

Harvested one of the butternut weeds on the weekend. We might need these for winter vegetables as theres not a brassica plant to be found in the shops over the weekend. Not even seeds... The

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I just throw seeds from a pumpkin I like in with old hay bales lining the fence line and wait till they decide to germinate. If I buy the plants it’s never the right time and either the wx, slugs or blackbirds get the new growth.  But this year the rats are eating out every seed that’s out there even though I caught at least 40 of the pests in my live traps. Might have to try something else.😩

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1 hour ago, Oma said:

I just throw seeds from a pumpkin I like in with old hay bales lining the fence line and wait till they decide to germinate. If I buy the plants it’s never the right time and either the wx, slugs or blackbirds get the new growth.  But this year the rats are eating out every seed that’s out there even though I caught at least 40 of the pests in my live traps. Might have to try something else.😩

I have a plague of rats too .

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1 hour ago, yesbut said:

How do you deal to them ?

A DOC 200, strong steel spring trap that squashes them and kills them very fast. We put dried rabbit meat in as a bait an also a Diphacinone block that is a rat poison.

 

Or, a couple of Diphacinone blocks in a Philproof bait station. 

 

We use both on DOC land approved by DOC and with their permission.

 

Goodnature A24's do a fine job as they don't need emptying or regular checking. Cost more though!

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7 hours ago, yesbut said:

How do you deal to them ?

I have 3 live catch wire traps brought from Farmlands years ago. I’ve wired them with a fish hook and use venison salami they can’t resist that and the outside rind is tough enough to hold on the hook. As the rats try to remove the bait the door slams shut, I then drown them in a bucket and sling them over the fence into the hay paddock. I must say we have some yummy looking fat rats here can understand how they have ended up on the menu in the past.  I have a wild hawk that has become very used to finding his dinner in the hay paddock just waiting for him day after day, he entertains us by circling down and carting them off.

I’ve tried all sorts of traps including A24s but this is the only way I have had success. As for the poison bait the rats round here eat it for breakfast and then turn up at lunch for more, I’m sure they have worked up a tolerance to it.

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8 hours ago, Oma said:

I have 3 live catch wire traps brought from Farmlands years ago. I’ve wired them with a fish hook and use venison salami they can’t resist that and the outside rind is tough enough to hold on the hook. As the rats try to remove the bait the door slams shut, I then drown them in a bucket and sling them over the fence into the hay paddock. I must say we have some yummy looking fat rats here can understand how they have ended up on the menu in the past.  I have a wild hawk that has become very used to finding his dinner in the hay paddock just waiting for him day after day, he entertains us by circling down and carting them off.

I’ve tried all sorts of traps including A24s but this is the only way I have had success. As for the poison bait the rats round here eat it for breakfast and then turn up at lunch for more, I’m sure they have worked up a tolerance to it.

When i was a kid we used to shoot rats in Turangi with air rifles.The dump was a good spot and the Tokaanu stream had the biggest water rats that ive ever seen to this day. They were huge.

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9 hours ago, Oma said:

ve tried all sorts of traps including A24s but this is the only way I have had success. As for the poison bait the rats round here eat it for breakfast and then turn up at lunch for more, I’m sure they have worked up a tolerance to it.

If it was not for the terrible smell in the bedroom wall I would be wondering if the poison was killing them too.

But the rats my cat brings in to eat on the carpet appear to be dead and she only eats the head .

I am using peanut butter in the trap . The biggest problem with that is the mice eating the bait and not setting off the trap .

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3 hours ago, YTB8TA270 said:

When i was a kid we used to shoot rats in Turangi with air rifles.The dump was a good spot and the Tokaanu stream had the biggest water rats that ive ever seen to this day. They were huge.

Yes the water rats come up to our place when the lower Tongariro floods. They are a beautiful animal, dark, a lovely shine on their thick coats, bright eyes, large and fat and edible if you were hungry enough. Quite different to the usual smaller grey, wiley, burrowing Norwegian compost rats.

 We now have a excellent trapping program running along the upper river banks so the river rats are getting a hammering and the blue duck population is increasing every year.

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39 minutes ago, Oma said:

Yes the water rats come up to our place when the lower Tongariro floods. They are a beautiful animal, dark, a lovely shine on their thick coats, bright eyes, large and fat and edible if you were hungry enough. Quite different to the usual smaller grey, wiley, burrowing Norwegian compost rats.

 We now have a excellent trapping program running along the upper river banks so the river rats are getting a hammering and the blue duck population is increasing every year.

Id have to be quite Hungry to eat a rat. Though i did eat some hedgehog at a school camp over the hill there once. Bout 1977. Have learnt how to find yummyer tucker since then.

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  • 3 months later...

Been a tough season, from a slow to get going cold to hot and dry to hotter and drier...

 

Nine small pumpkins, largest is 23cm across and come in at 4.6kg, not the best of crops but enough to get us through.

 

And no square ones, so some alterations are needed to the cunning plan.

 

 

200215 Pumpkin 001.JPG

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1 hour ago, Gwenyn Gwesty said:

Been a tough season, from a slow to get going cold to hot and dry to hotter and drier...

 

Nine small pumpkins, largest is 23cm across and come in at 4.6kg, not the best of crops but enough to get us through.

 

And no square ones, so some alterations are needed to the cunning plan.

 

 

200215 Pumpkin 001.JPG

Have the vines died off .

I never normally pick mine for another two months

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Yup, sure did.

 

Early pickings for us here as well, but the vines were in a very sorry state even though I watered twice a day. We've had many days of temps in the 30's which I've not seen before, and they were in quite a sun trap. I did however this year have them trailed over a trellis front and back, got so bushy I had to trim the leaves and offshoots which I think the plants didn't like!

 

Anyways, out with the old and in with the beans, leeks, onions and carrots. Bit early but what the heck...

 

Early days photo (2nd Dec) but you get the drift. The vines went all the way along and through the wire fence. The small front trellis was to stop them taking over our grass and to keep it tidy. Don't think I'll use it next year.

 

 

191202 Pumpkin 001.JPG

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  • 1 month later...

33250509-AF66-44D2-AFA1-C53B653F83B4.jpeg

I thought I'd revisit this post .....  

 

I have to admit I've neglected the pumpkin patch lately as the tomatoes and lettuces have been more demanding.  But in these new times  I thought I'd better check how the winter soup supplies are looking ......

 

 

I think there's only one word for it ..... but it might get moderated .

B******

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2 hours ago, Mummzie said:

We might need these for winter vegetables as theres not a brassica plant to be found in the shops over the weekend. Not even seeds...

Not even seeds

Thats ridiculous , if they did not buy them before what makes people think they will know what to do with them now .

It will just be a big waste of seeds .

People are all being enouraged to live like hippies now .

Good luck with that .

Most hippies gave up cause it was too hard .

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1 hour ago, kaihoka said:

Not even seeds

Thats ridiculous , if they did not buy them before what makes people think they will know what to do with them now .

It will just be a big waste of seeds .

People are all being enouraged to live like hippies now .

Good luck with that .

Most hippies gave up cause it was too hard .

rubbish we are still going

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2 hours ago, kaihoka said:

Not even seeds

Thats ridiculous , if they did not buy them before what makes people think they will know what to do with them now .

It will just be a big waste of seeds .

People are all being enouraged to live like hippies now .

Good luck with that .

Most hippies gave up cause it was too hard .

Lynda Hallinan - ex editor of NZ Gardner has posted an excellent 'beginners guide to fast growing food', and is widely followed, and given that everyone will hopefully be spending more time at home in the near future unale to do the things they usually do, whatever seeds she talked about, instantly sold out. She grew micro-greens in used coffee cups, so appealed to the greeny yuppie types.

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5 hours ago, Sailabee said:

Lynda Hallinan - ex editor of NZ Gardner has posted an excellent 'beginners guide to fast growing food', and is widely followed, and given that everyone will hopefully be spending more time at home in the near future unale to do the things they usually do, whatever seeds she talked about, instantly sold out. She grew micro-greens in used coffee cups, so appealed to the greeny yuppie types.

Perhaps the woman on TV the other night complaining about how difficult it will be to live on rice and porridge could be supplied with a packet of microgreens.  

 

I could grow some microgreens in my varroa alcohol wash jar.  

 

Nippi around the pippi today!  

Edited by Maggie James
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46 minutes ago, Maggie James said:

Perhaps the woman on TV the other night complaining about how difficult it will be to live on rice and porridge could be supplied with a packet of microgreens.  

 

Excellent suggestion, that woman certainly didn't evoke any sympathy here..

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