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Wildflower

NZBF Wax moth in new frames

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SORRY. LONG...I am full of a cold.😫

On the good side!!

Nose far too drippy/sneazy to go to work tommorrow. Taking Sunday off is a total no no.. but yay I am getting dipping day off.😁 So I sorted through my boxes, because Bee club has a dipping day tommorrow.

Going through my boxes finding which ones could do with a plane? You know. Smooth out my bad carpentry. Minimise bee stress!. And DAMN! found evidence of wax moth in my frames even though they seemed clear 2 weeks ago. I filled the last room in the freezer with any frames that have pollen/food etc. And have more frames in a plastic box. The new frames, I have removed any evidence I can of wax moth , and put them in reasonably clean boxes. Is this enough? What IS the life cycle of a wax moth?

 

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come on, @Wildflower you can do your research about the life cycle of wax moth, and then ask questions here which arise from your basic knowledge. 😀

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Stick the frames in the freezer for 48 hours.  Will kill wax moth eggs.  If you have massive quantities of frames, fill a container and use C02. 

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As said freezer full. Might buy one just for bees one day

 That is why I was wondering the life cycle of the wax moth freezer full for 48hrs

1 hour ago, tudor said:

come on, @Wildflower you can do your research about the life cycle of wax moth, and then ask questions here which arise from your basic knowledge. 😀

Nice. Yep can do

 Full of cold. Not full of brains at mo. Harsh Tudor!

32 minutes ago, Maggie James said:

Stick the frames in the freezer for 48 hours.  Will kill wax moth eggs.  If you have massive quantities of frames, fill a container and use C02. 

Need to learm about CO2

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54 minutes ago, Wildflower said:

. Harsh Tudor!

agree, and thanks for asking because it made me find out.

The moth life cycle consists of 4 stages. ... Wax moth eggs hatch to the larval stage in 5 to 8 days. New larvae burrow into beeswax comb attempting to reach the comb midrib. They are specialists to eat and grow and feed for 1 to 5 months, depending on the temperature

 

Google says freeze for 2 days, so it agrees with  Maggies 48 hours.

Edited by Mummzie
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Harsh  ?  That's the Socratic teaching method I have used for many years to help produce effective doctors.

"The oldest, and still the most powerful, teaching tactic for fostering critical thinking is Socratic teaching. In Socratic teaching we focus on giving students questions, not answers. We model an inquiring, probing mind by continually probing into the subject with questions. Fortunately, the abilities we gain by focusing on the elements of reasoning in a disciplined and self-assessing way, and the logical relationships that result from such disciplined thought, prepare us for Socratic questioning."

And producing good, inquiring bee keepers as well.

 

 

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9 hours ago, Mummzie said:

agree, and thanks for asking because it made me find out.

The moth life cycle consists of 4 stages. ... Wax moth eggs hatch to the larval stage in 5 to 8 days. New larvae burrow into beeswax comb attempting to reach the comb midrib. They are specialists to eat and grow and feed for 1 to 5 months, depending on the temperature

 

Google says freeze for 2 days, so it agrees with  Maggies 48 hours.

And thats why, with my freezer now

 

8 hours ago, tudor said:

Harsh  ?  That's the Socratic teaching method I have used for many years to help produce effective doctors.

"The oldest, and still the most powerful, teaching tactic for fostering critical thinking is Socratic teaching. In Socratic teaching we focus on giving students questions, not answers. We model an inquiring, probing mind by continually probing into the subject with questions. Fortunately, the abilities we gain by focusing on the elements of reasoning in a disciplined and self-assessing way, and the logical relationships that result from such disciplined thought, prepare us for Socratic questioning."

And producing good, inquiring bee keepers as well.

 

 

full for 48 hrs, I was wondering?

1. how much damage the moth can do in 48 hrs? 

2. Also wiith most of the obvious evidence of these critters,scraped off of all of my new frames in well scraped down boxes, how much chance for them to survive? 

 

20190914_110406.jpg

I now enquire as to how I split my enquiry into two? With Tudors wonderful description of Socratic teaching in the middle.🤔

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If you haven't frozen them, no matter how you have scrapped, there will still be eggs - often hidden in the holes the wire goes through.

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4 minutes ago, Sailabee said:

If you haven't frozen them, no matter how you have scrapped, there will still be eggs - often hidden in the holes the wire goes through.

I will freeze once other frames are out.

I think this might have to be a regular Winter regime.

Still curious how long they survive with no food? 

9 hours ago, tudor said:

Harsh  ?  That's the Socratic teaching method I have used for many years to help produce effective doctors.

"The oldest, and still the most powerful, teaching tactic for fostering critical thinking is Socratic teaching. In Socratic teaching we focus on giving students questions, not answers. We model an inquiring, probing mind by continually probing into the subject with questions. Fortunately, the abilities we gain by focusing on the elements of reasoning in a disciplined and self-assessing way, and the logical relationships that result from such disciplined thought, prepare us for Socratic questioning."

And producing good, inquiring bee keepers as well.

 

 

This is what I was looking for.....

Foundation is only partially attacked, usually around the edge where the wax fits into the groove in the wooden frame parts. This damage is caused by small larvae that have not found sufficient edible material, they stay small and as they are inadequately fed they often die before reaching adequate size to pupate.

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Once they have been in freezer then thawed out a hose will clean them up nicely .

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It’s interesting, if you read the NZ book (I’m 85% sure that’s where I read it) it says that wax moth doesn’t attack new/fresh foundation. Only old frames... looks like that’s not entirely correct.

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7 hours ago, Josh said:

It’s interesting, if you read the NZ book (I’m 85% sure that’s where I read it) it says that wax moth doesn’t attack new/fresh foundation. Only old frames... looks like that’s not entirely correct.

Well I can prove that!

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The moths like old comb that has been bred in - it's the cocoons they like to eat. Once you have killed the moth eggs/larvae, you need to stop the moths from getting at the comb again.

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