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Trevor Gillbanks

September 2019 Apiary Diary

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i have not yet found the queen in my hive full of bees.

she was a late summer supersedure and i have never found her to mark.

i would really like too, it makes all the difference to finding queens if they are marked.

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6 hours ago, kaihoka said:

i have not yet found the queen in my hive full of bees.

 

I struggle with the dark ones. It took me 3 runs through to find one this afternoon as I was splitting and didn’t want to mess things up. My finding skills aren’t great, but she is very good at hiding. 

Most her workers are half breed mongrels, but some that are basically black. They are very good natured though, and that’s key for me.

9E7B092F-F2D7-47D4-8CFF-E7A536C244F5.jpeg

Edited by cBank

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1 hour ago, cBank said:

 

I struggle with the dark ones. It took me 3 runs through to find one this afternoon as I was splitting and didn’t want to mess things up. My finding skills aren’t great, but she is very good at hiding. 

Most her workers are half breed mongrels, but some that are basically black. They are very good natured though, and that’s key for me.

9E7B092F-F2D7-47D4-8CFF-E7A536C244F5.jpeg

That is one odd looking queen . I have had them like that myself . Smaller than workers . Short abdomen .

They appeared to perform perfectly normally though 😊

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@M4tt

 it looks as small as a virgin .

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2 hours ago, cBank said:

 

I struggle with the dark ones. It took me 3 runs through to find one this afternoon as I was splitting and didn’t want to mess things up. My finding skills aren’t great, but she is very good at hiding. 

Most her workers are half breed mongrels, but some that are basically black. They are very good natured though, and that’s key for me.

9E7B092F-F2D7-47D4-8CFF-E7A536C244F5.jpeg

 

That black bee (without and Hair) looks like Chronic Bee Paralysis virus.

 

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5 minutes ago, Trevor Gillbanks said:

 

That black bee (without and Hair) looks like Chronic Bee Paralysis virus.

 

It does a bit .  Certainly odd.

Ive mucked around with queens from small cells from a carnica line a few years ago . Not too unlike that .

So, is it the queen or not ? ......

Edited by M4tt

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5 minutes ago, Trevor Gillbanks said:

 

That black bee (without and Hair) looks like Chronic Bee Paralysis virus.

 

Came across this hive the other day. Had a few cups of dead bees out the front but otherwise healthy with a box and a half of bees and some nice brood.

Screenshot_20190921-203942.png

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11 minutes ago, Trevor Gillbanks said:

 

That black bee (without and Hair) looks like Chronic Bee Paralysis virus.

 

 

Interesting. I’ll keep an eye on them. Thanks.

It’s definitely not the queen, she is rather more normal looking, but very dark.

There are a lot of very dark bees around me (and in my hives). I’ve seen them in flowers too and their behaviour seems normal.

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22 minutes ago, Jamo said:

Came across this hive the other day. Had a few cups of dead bees out the front but otherwise healthy with a box and a half of bees and some nice brood.

Screenshot_20190921-203942.png

I had half a dozen hives in the autumn with CBPV. Not the best thing to look at when you open a hive . 

20 minutes ago, cBank said:

 

It’s definitely not the queen

Ha, that clears that up then . 😎.

 

 

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4 minutes ago, M4tt said:

I had half a dozen hives in the autumn with CBPV. Not the best thing to look at when you open a hive .

 

Did you do anything to help clear it up? Keeping crowding to a minimum seems the only tip I can find - though presumably all the other things one can do are needed too (warm, dry, fed, varroa free and a good work/life balance).

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Just now, cBank said:

 

Did you do anything to help clear it up? Keeping crowding to a minimum seems the only tip I can find - though presumably all the other things one can do are needed too (warm, dry, fed, varroa free and a good work/life balance).

I merged a couple , and really did nothing else but observed . Lots would die in the unused feeders above . The healthy bees seem to herd them to the extremities of the hive . Outer frames were thick with diseased bees . A couple of the hives superceded in the midst of the turmoil . 

I didn’t feed any . Experience tells me they just drown in the syrup or ignore it .

No hives died . They worked their way through it and came right 

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10 minutes ago, cBank said:

 

Did you do anything to help clear it up? Keeping crowding to a minimum seems the only tip I can find - though presumably all the other things one can do are needed too (warm, dry, fed, varroa free and a good work/life balance).

 

Requeening fixes it.

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On 18/09/2019 at 2:28 PM, M4tt said:

What a beautiful day in the Waikato to be outdoors . Sun, warm , still.

 

I split two of my favourite hives into three queenless nucs, and used the nice mother  queens to requeen two hives with a poor attitude to me working them .

I moved the nucs from a block down the road , back home . Just far enough so the bees will reorientate. 

Once the new queens from the nucs are proven by their capped brood , they will be used to requeen more unpleasant hives . 

 

My bees are all on 3/4 gear now 😊. I feel more like the hobbiest that I actually am . 

1F4BAD51-5676-4CEC-BC36-145C249ECA21.jpeg

A959E5B2-EC87-4127-9FD4-F6DFC7785FC8.jpeg

Have you got enough drones being raised up there. I’ve only seen capped drone brood in my hives. It’ll be at least 4 more weeks before I do any queen rearing.

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1 minute ago, dansar said:

Have you got enough drones being raised up there. I’ve only seen capped drone brood in my hives. It’ll be at least 4 more weeks before I do any queen rearing.

Yes. I’ve had hives producing drones all throughout winter and queens mated successfully through winter. I have not found a winter supercedure drone layer yet ......go figure 

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A31D632B-D193-42E1-9DF8-39CA464B03BC.jpeg

The willows are way behind the eight ball down here in Te Wai Pounamu ..... no wonder ..... but the  beauty of the island is stupendous !

Edited by jamesc
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@jamesc
Things are late here to compared to last yr .

August and early sep were wet and windy this yr .

 

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30 minutes ago, kaihoka said:

@jamesc
Things are late here to compared to last yr .

August and early sep were wet and windy this yr .

 

Uh Huh ..... hanging out for a bit of grass growth .... but everything is getting zapped by frosts..

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On 21/09/2019 at 10:39 AM, M4tt said:

 

It does a bit .  Certainly odd.

Ive mucked around with queens from small cells from a carnica line a few years ago . Not too unlike that .

So, is it the queen or not ? ......

 

Since we over here have carnies seems as one oldie worker bee.. I saw some virgins, badly mated, but all seems slimmer than that worker bee..

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9 hours ago, jamesc said:

A31D632B-D193-42E1-9DF8-39CA464B03BC.jpeg

The willows are way behind the eight ball down here in Te Wai Pounamu ..... no wonder ..... but the  beauty of the island is stupendous !

Whatcha doing in Kaikoura? 

Amazing place

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41 minutes ago, Gino de Graaf said:

Whatcha doing in Kaikoura? 

Amazing place

Petrol head beach hop ....

Edited by jamesc

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I heard today of a bit of a theory I didn’t much like the sound of.

 

Pollination costs quite a bit . Hives are cheap at the moment .

 

You put those two scenarios together and you’re going to get hives bought and maybe not managed 😳.

 

This has happened before .......

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40 minutes ago, M4tt said:

I heard today of a bit of a theory I didn’t much like the sound of.

 

Pollination costs quite a bit . Hives are cheap at the moment .

 

You put those two scenarios together and you’re going to get hives bought and maybe not managed 😳.

 

This has happened before .......

Kamakaze hives  sounds like a really good way to reduce the national population very quickly.

Edited by jamesc
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I spoke with a money person a few days ago who simply could not get their head around the idea that the average farmer would struggle to manage their own permanent  pollination hives

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1 hour ago, M4tt said:

I heard today of a bit of a theory I didn’t much like the sound of.

 

Pollination costs quite a bit . Hives are cheap at the moment .

 

You put those two scenarios together and you’re going to get hives bought and maybe not managed 😳.

 

This has happened before ......

 

54 minutes ago, Philbee said:

I spoke with a money person a few days ago who simply could not get their head around the idea that the average farmer would struggle to manage their own permanent  pollination hives

 

the hives are not cheap enough for disposable hives...yet.

 

most of these things have been tried before and most orchards chat with each other, so most know the pitfalls of doing it.

i think the lads went and helped an orchard who is running their own hives because their beek got injured and was out of action.

however some orchards have done it very well, but generally they are big enough to have a full time dedicated businesses just doing the bees.

its the small ones that run into trouble, when the beekeeping is only part time and the orchard tends to come first rather than the bees, and thats when it all goes downhill.

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I inspected the hive today. That went well and I was happy with what I saw.

When I changed the hive around, I made sure there was a follower board on the brood side so I could just go in and inspect that area. I didnt quite have it far enough into the hive, but after the second frame, managed to not roll the bees.

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