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Trevor Gillbanks

September 2019 Apiary Diary

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For us as soon as the cabbage trees start flowering the westerly winds kick in for the next 4-6 weeks.  Right on cue this year. 

image.jpg

 

14 hours ago, Philbee said:

I live on a Ridge in Apiary land

Surrounded by Big guys and keep just two Hives at home, neither being flash.
This one is a battler, each spring just scraping through as it has done this time.
Always has a few dead Bees at the entrance, more so in  Spring.

Nosema today1.jpg

 

Are those nosema spores/bodies ??

 

12 hours ago, kaihoka said:

My macadamia is covered in buds , I am hoping they do not open for a week or two .

It will probably be another good yr for rewa rewa . I have never tried the honey but I have heard it is nice .

The native bees are active on the manuka in much colder and windier conditions than honey bees .

I would not consider mating a queen here till nov .

Spring mating are a waste of time for us too. 

Our build up is too slow for many hives to have drones. And then the queens have the spring winds to deal with. 

Rewa is my favourite honey 

Edited by Daley
Reported by poster. Spelling mistake fixed :)
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16 minutes ago, nikki watts said:

For us as soon as the cabbage trees start flowering the westerly winds kick in for the next 4-6 weeks.  Right on cue this year. 

image.jpg

Are those nosema spores/bodies ??

Spring mating are a waste of time for us too. 

Our build up is too slow for many hives to have drones. And then the queens ah e the spring winds to deal with. 

Rewa is my favourite honey 

Yes they are Nosema Spores
I cant tell the difference between a & c 

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Just now, Philbee said:

Yes they are Nosema Spores
I cant tell the difference between a & c 

Is that a lot of spores ?? If so did this hive have dysentery ? We never see dysentery but some hives just never get going, even when I requeen or add extra brood to kick them along. Some spots I have given up on and just leave that corner of the pallet empty. 

I’d love to have the time/skill/technology to test the hives and see what’s really going on with the non achievers.

Our lab testing budget all goes in testing the honey for sale. 

 

 

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11 hours ago, kaihoka said:

My macadamia is covered in buds , I am hoping they do not open for a week or two .

It will probably be another good yr for rewa rewa . I have never tried the honey but I have heard it is nice .

The native bees are active on the manuka in much colder and windier conditions than honey bees .

I would not consider mating a queen here till nov .

I am the same I will not consider any queen raising until november ready for the big rata flow in February - yeah right.

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I’m due to do my first graft tomorrow.

It’s a bit early for splits in my opinion but it’s ok for requeening with protected cells. When the weather settles a bit more and the temps are consistent I’ll split.

 

Took my mate to work the other day.

She did some wax destruction, and mooed at cows, we did find an Emu so that was novel.

 

2C210E15-BA64-4CC2-B16B-C9B3EAD0AD95.jpeg

052EA5C3-EBB5-46B1-82F4-61F5AB40CD76.jpeg

02E5C4F7-FD66-4328-8AD5-BB9F534B755D.jpeg

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1 hour ago, nikki watts said:

Is that a lot of spores ?? If so did this hive have dysentery ? We never see dysentery but some hives just never get going, even when I requeen or add extra brood to kick them along. Some spots I have given up on and just leave that corner of the pallet empty. 

I’d love to have the time/skill/technology to test the hives and see what’s really going on with the non achievers.

Our lab testing budget all goes in testing the honey for sale. 

 

 

This is a lot of spores as its shown at 1000x when normally we look at Nosema spores at 400x

I very rarely see Dysentry but do see this some years.

This hive is small and slow both last season and this.

It looks ok mid winter but peters out toward spring

just scraping through for another crack at Summer

Edited by Philbee

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Just now, Philbee said:

This is a lot of spores as its shown at 1000x when normally we look at Nosema spores at 400x

I very rarely see Dysentry but do see this some years.

This hive is small and slow both last season and this.

It looks ok mid winter but peters out toward spring

just scraping through for another crack at Summer

Sounds like some of ours 

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As we learned over here N. cerana isn't followed by dysentery, it is followed by bees disappearing. As long there is lot of pollen, infected colonies might seem healthy even some with heavy load of N.cerana. When pollen stop coming, bees start disappearing ( flying away and dying out). Lot of scientists here say that N. apis is nearly extinct and its niche is filled with mean N. cerana. Majority of winter losses over here is combination of varoosis and nosemosis.. according to the results of specimens taken from dead colonies.. How is said none of misfortune come alone..

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3 hours ago, Daley said:

I’m due to do my first graft tomorrow.

It’s a bit early for splits in my opinion but it’s ok for requeening with protected cells. When the weather settles a bit more and the temps are consistent I’ll split.

 

Took my mate to work the other day.

She did some wax destruction, and mooed at cows, we did find an Emu so that was novel.

 

2C210E15-BA64-4CC2-B16B-C9B3EAD0AD95.jpeg

052EA5C3-EBB5-46B1-82F4-61F5AB40CD76.jpeg

02E5C4F7-FD66-4328-8AD5-BB9F534B755D.jpeg

 It won’t be long till Riley is posting on here then ? She looks to have the game sorted out 😉

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10 hours ago, nikki watts said:

Is that a lot of spores ?? If so did this hive have dysentery ? We never see dysentery but some hives just never get going, even when I requeen or add extra brood to kick them along. Some spots I have given up on and just leave that corner of the pallet empty. 

I’d love to have the time/skill/technology to test the hives and see what’s really going on with the non achievers.

Our lab testing budget all goes in testing the honey for sale. 

 

 

 

Perhaps mark those frames for a heat treatment Nikki?

I just lost a hive thanks to spring dwindling (ie nosemas) - finished off by wasps. We’ve seen quite a bit nosemas - both ceranae and apis together (= twice as bad!) - this spring. 

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11 hours ago, Daley said:

I’m due to do my first graft tomorrow.

It’s a bit early for splits in my opinion but it’s ok for requeening with protected cells. When the weather settles a bit more and the temps are consistent I’ll split.

 

Took my mate to work the other day.

She did some wax destruction, and mooed at cows, we did find an Emu so that was novel.

 

2C210E15-BA64-4CC2-B16B-C9B3EAD0AD95.jpeg

052EA5C3-EBB5-46B1-82F4-61F5AB40CD76.jpeg

02E5C4F7-FD66-4328-8AD5-BB9F534B755D.jpeg

I guess she's the reason we went on strike today.

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27 minutes ago, jamesc said:

I guess she's the reason we went on strike today.

Haha she hasn’t decided on her position on climate change yet. 

Could work in her favour, in another 50 years our house could be beach front.

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2 hours ago, frazzledfozzle said:

@JohnF what are the symptoms of a hive with nosema apis and ceranae ?

 

Rapid hive dwindling  -  Cororapa.

Unlike what @Goran mentioned with overseas, here we can see apis, ceranae or both. And as above, its twice as bad when its both

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3 minutes ago, JohnF said:

 

Rapid hive dwindling  -  Cororapa.

Unlike what @Goran mentioned with overseas, here we can see apis, ceranae or both. And as above, its twice as bad when its both

@JohnF Looking at the slide photo do you have an opinion on what Nosemas are present? 

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Symptoms of a hive with both Nosemas = slow dwindling death.

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Not necessarily.

My sample hive at one point had both nosemas and lotmaria, it certainly didn’t die.

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1 hour ago, Philbee said:

@JohnF Looking at the slide photo do you have an opinion on what Nosemas are present? 


Almost impossible to differentiate with microscopy. I think @Dave Black had worked on it.

If I had to put money on it, given the differing shapes (some longer and thinner) then I'd say you had both

 

6 minutes ago, Daley said:

Not necessarily.

My sample hive at one point had both nosemas and lotmaria, it certainly didn’t die.

 

n=1

But yes, if detected early then not necessarily a death sentence. I knew my one was weak but wasps hit it

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7 hours ago, JohnF said:


Almost impossible to differentiate with microscopy. I think @Dave Black had worked on it.

Agreed. It looks like apis predominantly, but without being able to manipulate the focus...

if you imagine them as a coffee bean, you get different shaped silhouettes as you rotate around the long axis, and another seen end on.

But I wonder if it's important for the average Joe to know, it's all nosema, and the effects are pretty much the same. Sometimes we get lost in the details.

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23 hours ago, Daley said:

I’m due to do my first graft tomorrow.

It’s a bit early for splits in my opinion but it’s ok for requeening with protected cells. When the weather settles a bit more and the temps are consistent I’ll split.

 

Took my mate to work the other day.

She did some wax destruction, and mooed at cows, we did find an Emu so that was novel.

 

2C210E15-BA64-4CC2-B16B-C9B3EAD0AD95.jpeg

052EA5C3-EBB5-46B1-82F4-61F5AB40CD76.jpeg

02E5C4F7-FD66-4328-8AD5-BB9F534B755D.jpeg

What a doll, she is beautiful @Daley

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7 minutes ago, fieldbee said:

What a doll, she is beautiful @Daley

 

Those bottom two photos looks like Riley standing on top of a hive to look at emu's,

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10 hours ago, JohnF said:


Almost impossible to differentiate with microscopy. I think @Dave Black had worked on it.

If I had to put money on it, given the differing shapes (some longer and thinner) then I'd say you had both

 

 

n=1

But yes, if detected early then not necessarily a death sentence. I knew my one was weak but wasps hit it

Lesson for me has been that High Nosemas loads can be present without visual Dysentery.
This slide is from dead Bees which where slightly dehydrated so had water added which dilutes the count.

 

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1 hour ago, Dennis Crowley said:

 

Those bottom two photos looks like Riley standing on top of a hive to look at emu's,

 

Trust me she would! She’s a climber!

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3 hours ago, Dave Black said:

Agreed. It looks like apis predominantly, but without being able to manipulate the focus...

if you imagine them as a coffee bean, you get different shaped silhouettes as you rotate around the long axis, and another seen end on.

But I wonder if it's important for the average Joe to know, it's all nosema, and the effects are pretty much the same. Sometimes we get lost in the details.

 

Hmm, not sure on that Dave . . we can see high apis in bees/colony that is not going backward - or a hive that had a reduced/no crop . .its more when we see high ceranae that there are hive issues and when we follow up on high ceranae *and* apis samples, usually the hive has collapsed if left alone

50 minutes ago, Philbee said:

Lesson for me has been that High Nosemas loads can be present without visual Dysentery.
This slide is from dead Bees which where slightly dehydrated so had water added which dilutes the count.

 

 

 Randy Oliver mentioned at conference last year that the dysentery (ascribed to nosema apis, not ceranae as Goran says) was actually caused by a yeast he'd been told. I haven't seen anything about that (should follow up with him) but yes, we can detect high apis or ceranae levels with nothing on the front of the hive

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15 hours ago, JohnF said:

Perhaps mark those frames for a heat treatment Nikki?

Please can you expand on this. Some time ago I went to a Waikato NZB day where MG gave a talk about preliminary results of heat treatment of empty brood in a warmer than normal hot room. Are you referring to the same thing? Was there a publication of the final results?

 

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