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jamesc

The folding note.

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11 hours ago, Alastair said:

 

 

Not sure if it's strictly classed as export since it's being sold within NZ, maybe a legal loophole don't know.

 

However people returning to China love to take some manuka to dish out to their friends and family, but why would they pay big bucks for a jar when they can get that. All the friends going to know is it says manuka on the bottle.

Very true. And I guess if I didn’t know better I’d think I was buying a bargain.

The laws really need reworking to make all Manuka labelling  a level playing field. One unit of measure, one definition of what is manuka for export and/or domestic market. 

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14 hours ago, Alastair said:

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These being sold at Auckland Airport for $5.00 a jar or a 6 pack 30 bucks.

 

Yes, same in Pak N Save: 250g is $5.00, 500g is around $11.00. Surprises me, everyone else charges less per gram as the pack size increases. Manufacturing and package costs are about the same irrespective of size...

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Just been to Palmy Pak and Slave.  Arataki creamed honey $7.99 500 gms.  And same price for Arataki creamed honey with Manuka.

(Creamed honey with Manuka) not sure what that means.??

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Someone said Human nature...

 

when I tell people that I’m a beekeeper the first or second question out of their mouth is “oh, do you get manuka”?

 

They must have heard my helicopter arrive in the car park...

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Does the rigorous MPI Manuka standard apply to Domestic.... 

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going back to talking about banks and folding notes, I attach a link to the BNZ weekly overview by Tony Alexander that I hope will work.

It should take you a pdf of his newsletter or download his pdf. This is a commentary about the whole economy. He discusses the labour market, prices, people buying cheaper off the internet and rhetorically asks "so, are we munted?" in case you don't have the time, I can inform you that we are not munted, but we are challenged.

 

https://feedback.bnz.co.nz/files/file/ynxOiN3cdkiV-wjXLJaNJw

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Yep, really enjoy Tony Alexander's weekly overview. Look out for it on Thursdays. 

He's almost always right, very relevant and writes well

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6 hours ago, Gino de Graaf said:

Does the rigorous MPI Manuka standard apply to Domestic.... 

No it dosent apply to domestic or stuff sold through airports and duty free shops, and I think some bulk shipments,  looking at that but MPI a bit slow as it could hinder/upset/ inter fare  free trade agreements. They still being worked on about it but, what the f do we know. 

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Probably what's going on atm. "Manuka" that did not make the grade under the new standards to go overseas, being dumped into the NZ market. I know some beekeepers will be feeling extreme pain at those prices. 

 

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On 27/08/2019 at 3:27 AM, jamesc said:

Uh huh .... which is why we need to embrace new bees like Haider to move our product.

The main problem is that we are told  product is too expensive on the world market.

 

We gotta edeumacate that market that our honey has no rice bran, sugar or anything else you  might care to mix  it with.

It is the real deal . And that is why we expect the price we want for it.

And that is why it is sitting in my shed and I am selling breeding cows and hinds to generate cash flow to live upto my human rights obligations of providing food and shelter for those staunch men who show up for work here every day.

 

And I'm telling you Bro, it would turn a lesser man to drink ....

I am told green tea is good for the constitution.. 

The education process is core to the development the NZ honey market growth overseas. We have just returned from the USA have met with over 20 major retailers in a single week. Key elements of our pitch are all about selling the NZ story. Quality, purity, authenticity etc. I can assure you that as producer/packers and marketers we are not asleep at the wheel. The marketing investment targeted at creating new markets is very substantial. 

On 28/08/2019 at 12:33 PM, kaihoka said:

The general public does not know the difference between MGO and UMF.

All they see is a big number , like sun screen  protection rating .

Awareness and understanding is growing. There will always be certain brands that want to blur and confuse. 

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Ah there you are. Welcome home Bro .... 😃

Do you bring good news from Mr Trumps paradise ?

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3 hours ago, jamesc said:

Do you bring good news from Mr Trumps paradise ?

 

Ah yes, "We're going to buy Greenland, and Mexico is going to pay for it"!🤣🤣🤣

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16 hours ago, jamesc said:

Ah there you are. Welcome home Bro .... 😃

Do you bring good news from Mr Trumps paradise ?

Oh yes. Tremendous reaction to our product ranges and brands. We generated some excitement. Nothing is instant though. Big retailers have processes and hoops to jump through. Nothing we can't handle and haven't done before. It is just much more complicated than here's a jar, thats the price, now buy!

Importantly, we were promoting our ranges of Non Manuka as well as Manuka and the reaction to our new product development was stunning. 

On 29/08/2019 at 12:48 AM, Dennis Crowley said:

No it dosent apply to domestic or stuff sold through airports and duty free shops, and I think some bulk shipments,  looking at that but MPI a bit slow as it could hinder/upset/ inter fare  free trade agreements. They still being worked on about it but, what the f do we know. 

No It definitely does not apply to domestic. This is a shocking loop hole. Unfortunately many of the cheaper brands or regularly discounted brands thrive with this loop hole. It does nothing for the integrity of the market and the industry. It is very sad when export standards far exceed the standards available to the general NZ consumer. Buyer beware.

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6 hours ago, Adam Boot said:

It is very sad when export standards far exceed the standards available to the general NZ consumer. Buyer beware

Is the NZ consumer going to get sick eating this lower standard Honey?
 

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Nah mate .... we is still munching our way through some really "cheap" honey.  So is half of Whitecliffs and they still keep coming back for more so it can't be that bad !

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There’s definately some clever labelling on the shelves.. the  70+ Manuka caught my eye today.. . in fine print stating 70+ Manuka pollen count.

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Got any walnuts & pastry.  Baaklava yummy.  Like honey in mulled wine and on my carrots

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13 minutes ago, Stoney said:

There’s definately some clever labelling on the shelves.. the  70+ Manuka caught my eye today.. . in fine print stating 70+ Manuka pollen count.

 

I wanted to get a manuka pollen count done on some honey but the person in the SI who does it told me they can't distinguish between manuka and kanuka.....so chances are that 70+ may not even be a 7+

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It's about time to raise the point again that all the MPI standards and mumbo jumbo may have an effect on the quality of medicinal honey, but have no effect at all on honey taken by mouth.  Certainly, keep our non-medicinal honeys free of adulteration with non-honey compounds, but they are all just honey, and people buy them because they are nice to eat.  True advertising should say "buy and eat our honey because it tastes and smells so nice, and that's the only reason".

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1 hour ago, Stoney said:

There’s definately some clever labelling on the shelves.. the  70+ Manuka caught my eye today.. . in fine print stating 70+ Manuka pollen count.

 

Agreed and it sucks. It is this kind of cleverness that got the industry where it is now.

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4 minutes ago, Alastair said:

 

Agreed and it sucks. It is this kind of cleverness that got the industry where it is now.

It is now at a point of no return in my opinion...

distancing yourself from the trick labelling and get back to the true good ###### honest jar of “it’s exactly what I say it is” 

 

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12 hours ago, tudor said:

It's about time to raise the point again that all the MPI standards and mumbo jumbo may have an effect on the quality of medicinal honey, but have no effect at all on honey taken by mouth.  Certainly, keep our non-medicinal honeys free of adulteration with non-honey compounds, but they are all just honey, and people buy them because they are nice to eat.  True advertising should say "buy and eat our honey because it tastes and smells so nice, and that's the only reason".

When the consumer buys Manuka they have made a choice based upon what they have read, heard, witnessed and believe that is is more than just honey but is of benefit to them. For this reason the consumer pays the much higher price. It is not for the taste. Anyone making a purchase should be treated with respect and be sold the product they think/believe they are buying. To have one clearly higher standard for export product and for the domestic consumer to be largely unaware of the difference is quite wrong. It is unfair to the consumer and dangerous to the industry long term. Product on the shelf in NZ is bought and sent to friends and family over seas it is also purchased by tourist and taken or sent overseas. In my opinion it is just a matter of time before there is another journalistic, media beat up over varying quality and confusion over true to label. 

UMF grading is a clear indicator that the product has met MPI Manuka honey science definition (export standard). While dual standards remain in place this is a mark that the consumer can rely upon. Unfortunately the consumer is probably also unaware of this? 

 

Adam

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To be able to label your Manuka with the UMF trademark you have to pay tens of thousands of dollars.

In my opinion UMF is a money making exercise and those that produce Manuka honey should not be compelled to use it to legitimately sell their honey as Manuka.

 

 

Edited by frazzledfozzle
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49 minutes ago, Adam Boot said:

When the consumer buys Manuka they have made a choice based upon what they have read, heard, witnessed and believe that is is more than just honey but is of benefit to them. For this reason the consumer pays the much higher price. It is not for the taste. Anyone making a purchase should be treated with respect and be sold the product they think/believe they are buying. To have one clearly higher standard for export product and for the domestic consumer to be largely unaware of the difference is quite wrong. It is unfair to the consumer and dangerous to the industry long term. Product on the shelf in NZ is bought and sent to friends and family over seas it is also purchased by tourist and taken or sent overseas. In my opinion it is just a matter of time before there is another journalistic, media beat up over varying quality and confusion over true to label. 

UMF grading is a clear indicator that the product has met MPI Manuka honey science definition (export standard). While dual standards remain in place this is a mark that the consumer can rely upon. Unfortunately the consumer is probably also unaware of this? 

 

Adam

"Anyone making a purchase ... the product they think/believe they are buying" is what it is all about.  Misinformation about the benefits has been very successfully used, and reminds me about the measles epidemic which is with us now, partly due to misinformation about the dangers of immunization with MMR.  The link to autism has been shown to be fraudulent and the doctor involved struck off, but it is still seen as a risk and contributes to reduction of "herd immunity".  So with the benefits of oral manuka honey, consumers have been told so often about how good it is for health - it is not, but it's ridiculously good for the folding notes of people along the chain from the manuka trees to the shelf.

Journalistic beat ups sometimes reveal the truth.

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