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jamesc

The folding note.

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Posted (edited)

It is generally not PC to hang ones washing out for the the world to view, but we seem to be living in extraordinary times and so the rules of old tend to get thrown out the door.

Talking about money is not really PC ..... and yet it is what we all are in business to make.

The folding note sustains us. It enables us to buy bread, and gas, replace our worn out threads and employ people to grow our business's  which enables  others to follow their dreams and raise their families.

I was interested to read today the Reserve Banks Governor's  comment that the four major banks within NZ are not immune from falling from grace, and that if one falls, then most likely, all will fall.

There is no doubt that farm lending is at an all time high as people have dreamt big to realise the potential that their land can rise to.

And now the banks are  being reined in to increase the ratio of money to lending to give them some resilience to world affairs. 

Now I don't proclaim to being an economist, but I do know that to be sucessfull in business it generally pays to have more coming in than goes out.

I also know that move forward one has to take risks.

Banking is a risky business.

 

What really irks me is that the Bank has been hounding us for over twelve months to repay debt, despite the fact that that debt is less than 15% of the total assets that we hold. And  what really irks me is that they always come back to the fact that wages are one of our biggest expenses ...... and that we should probably lay staff off for the the Bank to survive. 

It's a dirty world out there for sure. Big dog likes to eat little dog ......  but as a humanity, we also have a moral obligation to ensure that every soul has shelter and food. That is very basic Human Rights 101.

 

So .....if you are in the banking trade,  go Spotify Alan Jacksons ' Little man'  ..... and don't ever forget who made the honey that you might put on yer toast on a morning.

 

 

 

 

Edited by jamesc
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Been watching the retail price of honey coming down in the local supermarket, totally expected, but. When the price of a 500 g pot hit $10 i thought i could live with that, and that would be about it.

 

But yesterday i saw 500 g clover for $7.49. Bit of a shock. Because the retailers profit margin, cost of distribution, and cost of bottling, there will be precious little for the beekeeper. 

 

I guess lower prices will increase sales, but all the same, don't think i'll be making the next million any time soon.

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5 minutes ago, Alastair said:

Been watching the retail price of honey coming down in the local supermarket, totally expected, but. When the price of a 500 g pot hit $10 i thought i could live with that, and that would be about it.

 

But yesterday i saw 500 g clover for $7.49. Bit of a shock. Because the retailers profit margin, cost of distribution, and cost of bottling, there will be precious little for the beekeeper. 

 

I guess lower prices will increase sales, but all the same, don't think i'll be making the next million any time soon.

Basic economics tells us that the price can only stay there while there a stocks to maintain the supply.

 

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Yes well there are plenty of stocks in fact a possible several years worth, with future production likely to outsrip sales for the next few years. 

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Posted (edited)
14 minutes ago, Alastair said:

Yes well there are plenty of stocks in fact a possible several years worth, with future production likely to outsrip sales for the next few years. 

Uh huh .... which is why we need to embrace new bees like Haider to move our product.

The main problem is that we are told  product is too expensive on the world market.

 

We gotta edeumacate that market that our honey has no rice bran, sugar or anything else you  might care to mix  it with.

It is the real deal . And that is why we expect the price we want for it.

And that is why it is sitting in my shed and I am selling breeding cows and hinds to generate cash flow to live upto my human rights obligations of providing food and shelter for those staunch men who show up for work here every day.

 

And I'm telling you Bro, it would turn a lesser man to drink ....

I am told green tea is good for the constitution.. 

Edited by jamesc
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4 minutes ago, jamesc said:

Uh huh .... which is why we need to embrace new bees like Haider to move our product.

The main problem is that we are told  product is too expensive on the world market.

 

We gotta edeumacate that market that our honey has no rice bran, sugar or anything else you  might care to mix  it with.

It is the real deal . And that is why we expect the price we want for it.

And that is why it is sitting in my shed and I am selling breeding cows and hinds to generate cash flow to live upto my human rights obligations of providing food and shelter for those staunch men who show up for work here every day.

If the world is awash with cheap honey why would anyone need to adulterated it  .?

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1 minute ago, kaihoka said:

If the world is awash with cheap honey why would anyone need to adulterated it  .?

The world is awash because most of it is adulterated.

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James,think outside the box and market your own honey.What makes your honey different from any one elses.Go for a trip and see what the punters want.

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Posted (edited)
9 minutes ago, Bighands said:

James,think outside the box and market your own honey.What makes your honey different from any one elses.Go for a trip and see what the punters want.

Ah  hah..... I was thinking of heading over to Apimondia ..... jumping on  a winged Waka and picking up a beat up Harley in LA and living the dream.

We is marketing our honey ..... the problem is the market  is in revolution and nobody eating real food.

Whatever.... Seeing as this  Poetry week 

 

It's late,

Mate,

I'm looking at an empty crate,

Again.

Thank God for Dr Speight in his card board box 

 

I think that's called a Raku.

 

 

 

It's the sort of thing Riki baker would have come up with in " Hunt for the wildepeople".

And that was  a good movie ... eh.

Edited by jamesc
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8 hours ago, jamesc said:

 

It's the sort of thing Riki baker would have come up with in " Hunt for the wildepeople".

And that was  a good movie ... eh.

 

Such a good movie !

9 hours ago, Philbee said:

Basic economics tells us that the price can only stay there while there a stocks to maintain the supply.

 

 

I bet those low prices had an Airborne label, they have been buying up stocks of non Manuka for $3kg and $4kg so if it’s selling for nearly $15kg on the supermarket shelf there’s a good profit in it for them. I feel sorry for the poor ######s that have had to sell at that price.

 

Having said that we sold our Bush for $5kg which is not sustainable but it made room in the shed and was a dollar more than anyone else.

We had an offer of $6kg for our multi Manuka sold it later for two and a half times that amount.

 

there are some packers out there right now taking advantage of beekeepers desperation and making big money off the back of it.

 

There are also big companies going overseas heavily undercutting existing markets taking contracts off other, often family owned beekeeping enterprises and devaluing NZ honeys by doing so.

 

A race to the bottom.

 

It would be good if we all kept the names of these companies in the back of our minds so when things settle down we can avoid selling to them if at all possible. 

Have to mention I saw Aratakis new/ old cardboard packaging and really love it :) 

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That's another thing i've noticed at the supermarket, heaps of honey in cardboard pottles all of a sudden.

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39 minutes ago, frazzledfozzle said:

A race to the bottom.

It seems theres a race to the bottom in so many areas.

Is that cause there are so many of us .

I can remember in the 60s when the goal was to lift every body up .

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10 hours ago, kaihoka said:

It seems theres a race to the bottom in so many areas.

Is that cause there are so many of us .

I can remember in the 60s when the goal was to lift every body up .

Well, I guess I'll be alright then as I was generally at the back of the pack in most races.

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10 hours ago, frazzledfozzle said:

There are also big companies going overseas heavily undercutting existing markets taking contracts off other, often family owned beekeeping enterprises and devaluing NZ honeys by doing so.

 

Frazz, not only the big guys, there is also family owned beekeeping enterprises doing this, when it comes to a down market human nature comes to the fore, and you should never be surprised by that.

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Posted (edited)

I never thought about devaluing the market when I gave my 30kg away to the neighbours. Sorry.

Edited by yesbut
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35 minutes ago, Dennis Crowley said:

Frazz, not only the big guys, there is also family owned beekeeping enterprises doing this, when it comes to a down market human nature comes to the fore, and you should never be surprised by that.

 

Im surprised at the undercutting going on in the Manuka market offshore.

According to Karin Kos the Manuka market is still strong with no problems in selling product and yet there’s huge undercutting going on by companies selling overseas.

 

So I’m blowed if I know what the heck is going on

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2 minutes ago, frazzledfozzle said:

 

Im surprised at the undercutting going on in the Manuka market offshore.

According to Karin Kos the Manuka market is still strong with no problems in selling product and yet there’s huge undercutting going on by companies selling overseas.

 

So I’m blowed if I know what the heck is going on

The conflicting views are a result of a fragmented marketing sector.

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23 minutes ago, Philbee said:

The conflicting views are a result of a fragmented marketing sector.

Quite right. You need a Co-op.

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9 minutes ago, yesbut said:

Quite right. You need a Co-op.

And we will have one

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.

These being sold at Auckland Airport for $5.00 a jar or a 6 pack 30 bucks.

 

 

Manuka $5.jpg

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20 minutes ago, Alastair said:

.

These being sold at Auckland Airport for $5.00 a jar or a 6 pack 30 bucks.

 

 

Manuka $5.jpg

Hang on....The jar says it’s manuka honey whilst the box says multi floral. How can they sell multi floral as Manuka for export ? An mgo of 40 certainly suggests multi not mono. 

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Posted (edited)

To me a MGO 40 suggests a mere lick of manuka in the mix. 

 

Not sure if it's strictly classed as export since it's being sold within NZ, maybe a legal loophole don't know.

 

However people returning to China love to take some manuka to dish out to their friends and family, but why would they pay big bucks for a jar when they can get that. All the friends going to know is it says manuka on the bottle.

Edited by Alastair
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Posted (edited)

The photo is all blurry, 

were you shaking with laughter

or shocked with fear

or maybe it's just my breakfast .......

 

40 mgo .... we pulled a forty five out of the coast least summer and it sure as heck is'nt manuka.

I don't  know why as an industry we don't label our product  in Te Reo and then all our honey becomes Manuka ..... end of problem .

 

Edited by jamesc

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The general public does not know the difference between MGO and UMF.

All they see is a big number , like sun screen  protection rating .

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34 minutes ago, jamesc said:

The photo is all blurry, 

 

Yes didn't realise that until i got home nad processed the pic. In case it's too hard to make out, it's a 250 gram jar.

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