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Trevor Gillbanks

August 2019 Apiary Diary

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Last month of winter.

Spring is just around the corner and the new bee season is starting.

Best wishes for the season folks.

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Our calendar spring starts in september, bees spring starts a little earlier, bloody slave drivers.

 

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48D43D52-FE7A-4449-A4FC-6A3146766A14.jpeg

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been a busy day on the ranch .....  tha horses hooves needed a tong up ..... and the bee boxes needed a hot wax dip and a spruce up ...... all of which makes yah quite thirsty.

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Dipping boxes is right at the top of my list of most hated beekeeping jobs 

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Ah well .... you are obviously doing it wrong. I thinkt he secret is to multi task and keep an eye on two jobs with a  bottle of rum ..... it just seems to smooth out the the stress ....

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2 hours ago, frazzledfozzle said:

Dipping boxes is right at the top of my list of most hated beekeeping jobs 

It looks scary stuff to me .

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Is it too early to be putting in spring mite control in Auckland?

I go in for back surgery next week which puts me out of commission for the next 6 months.  I could get strips into my 4 hobby hives this weekend as a last act of defiance, but not much point if I am doing it too early and it puts the hives at risk later in the season.

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If you don't do it for the next six months they'll be at risk too.

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34 minutes ago, yesbut said:

If you don't do it for the next six months they'll be at risk too.

I do have a friend that will be helping out in the coming months with spring busyness, but I plan to check the hives tomorrow (weather dependent) so could put it in now, but that's a lot earlier than I would normally plan for.

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I can't comment further, I'm an O & G man, and the stuff is in most of the time outside the flow.

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2 hours ago, Neville said:

Is it too early to be putting in spring mite control in Auckland?

I go in for back surgery next week which puts me out of commission for the next 6 months.  I could get strips into my 4 hobby hives this weekend as a last act of defiance, but not much point if I am doing it too early and it puts the hives at risk later in the season.

Do it 

 

Early is far better than late 😊

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Apivar for spring treatment

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1 minute ago, Neville said:

Apivar for spring treatment

 

Do it!

It stays 10 weeks in the hive and it kicks in slower so it makes sense to start it now.

Your friend can remove it in mid october and in november you will have a good hive for foraging. Meanwhile swarming control should be kept in mind too.

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Dodging squalls today to walk the dog. Two clematis in full flower, that puts spring about four weeks early. 

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3 hours ago, Apihappy said:

Dodging squalls today to walk the dog. Two clematis in full flower, that puts spring about four weeks early. 

Any plant that had  decided that spring had come early and acted accordingly is in for a nasty shock and big sulk .

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2 hours ago, kaihoka said:

Any plant that had  decided that spring had come early and acted accordingly is in for a nasty shock and big sulk .

 

The 'icy blast' for the Waitakeres was a temperate 14C. a bit damp today but the dam we walked to was 2/3 empty. Dry July. I'm really surprised that drought stress hasn't been included in the mix for Kauri dieback.

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Today I went out for my first round of the season
Looked in 100 Hives and tested the first one

The Hive I tested was last tested in April 2019 with a count of 0/400 but today shock horror it had a bloody Mite in a wash of 300 bees.

Gut wrenching stuff but it should pull through ok

 518069371_firstspringhivetested.thumb.jpg.01c52416f5d7b4a23f089344c127bae0.jpg

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From what I am seeing in our hives, I am beginning to think this might be an optical illusion ..... no offense !

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Posted (edited)

@Philbee The Staples can't take all the credit- there is  a LOT of Carnica in those mongrels of yours!!

Edited by David Yanke
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8 minutes ago, David Yanke said:

@Philbee The Staples can't take all the credit- there is  a LOT of Carnica in those mongrels of yours!!

of course and as well as that I'm an outstanding beekeeper lol.

it has occurred to me that my journey has been a difficult one for both myself and my Bees.

I've bred them in realative exclusion with minimal imports.

the base was from Dallas but Jared supplied carnies also.

my queens tend to be colored midway between black and gold.

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Today is the start of the next phase of beekeeping . Late winter.

 

The bees are just starting to build up and are very busy bringing in white pollen, which must be gum and tree Lucerne.

 

The bees look the healthiest I've seen in a very long time at this time of the year. Of course , I credit @Philbee's Staples. 

 

So, in line with what I now understand to be best practice, the February Staples have all been removed , and to be honest , they look 'spent' , and have been replaced with brand new Staples smack bang in the brood. In most cases , it is 2 Staples per hive, which will get added to each visit as the brood increases. I like to have one leg of a staple touching brood, leaving no frames of brood untreated . 

 

Add to that, a full shake down of all brood frames for a full AFB check , as well as a scrape down of propolis and wax off the interior of the boxes so frames slide easily for future frame manipulation. 

 

One hive nailed my beesuit leaving a raft of stings behind , many penetrating and getting me . This behaviour is unacceptable and the queen is marked for despatch a bit later on. She is a new late autumn supercedure queen .

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it is hard for small time beek to buy staples.

maybe if i got a group together it would worth while in number for phil to sell to amateurs

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3 minutes ago, kaihoka said:

it is hard for small time beek to buy staples.

maybe if i got a group together it would worth while in number for phil to sell to amateurs

This is why I don't bother with the things. I stick to the towels in various forms. Laid flat across the top of frames, rolled up flattened between frames, or shoved in the front door.

The goo is really simple to make & utilize.  just a pyrex bowl, set of digital scales, and a microwave. If Ovaboard was available in less than house size rolls I'd use that instead of towels.  I have tried re-purposing toilet roll centres, but they're just not big enough.

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5 hours ago, kaihoka said:

it is hard for small time beek to buy staples.

maybe if i got a group together it would worth while in number for phil to sell to amateurs

 

It doesn’t take that long to stitch a massive roll of Gib paper, then just cut off what you need and dump it in the bucket.

 

That said, the genuine item is pretty flash, and my single stitch pauper staple is looking very last season.

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