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John T

Breeding bees to resist varroa mites on their own

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I don't know  if anyone has seen this or aware of the latest research, but this article is about breeding bees to resist varroa mites.

It also suggests doing nothing and let natural selection take place - eliminate bees that can't resist mites.

The article also mentions the continuing search for genes that are resistant to mites.

 

https://www.sciencemag.org/news/2019/07/breeders-toughen-bees-resist-deadly-mites

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41 minutes ago, John T said:

I don't know  if anyone has seen this or aware of the latest research, but this article is about breeding bees to resist varroa mites.

It also suggests doing nothing and let natural selection take place - eliminate bees that can't resist mites.

The article also mentions the continuing search for genes that are resistant to mites.

 

https://www.sciencemag.org/news/2019/07/breeders-toughen-bees-resist-deadly-mites

Lol

I like the quote in the attachment that compares breeding Mite resistant Bees to Breeding sheep that are resistant to Wolves

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They tried the 'no treatment' approach in Russia when varroa first appeared, and when over 95% of the total number of colonies were dead, and the whole food chain was collapsing, the illustrious rulers decided that maybe that wasn't the way to go.

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12 minutes ago, Sailabee said:

They tried the 'no treatment' approach in Russia when varroa first appeared, and when over 95% of the total number of colonies were dead, and the whole food chain was collapsing, the illustrious rulers decided that maybe that wasn't the way to go.

thats funny. because certain russian breeds now apparently survive without treatment ("primorsky"). And the statement that the food chain would collapse is simply put not true.

 

The capabilities of evolution and the ignorance of beekeepers apparently both are nearly unlimited.

 

Randy Olivers successes just after 2 years speak for themselves.

 

Even if you just take the time and do a quick google search you'll find plenty of beekeepers worldwide who have not treated their bees for a few years and still have minimal winter losses . I happen to know 2 european ones personally.

 

I wouldnt be surprised if there were even cases like that in new zealand (and keeping quiet about it for obvious reasons)

 

While I would never suggest anybody to just stop treating, especially not beginners and "commercials" with less than a few years of experience, people who know what they are doing and follow a similar approach to mr Oliver could and should go ahead with trying to breed for more mite resistant/tolerant stock.

 

 

 

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Randy Oliver spoke about treatment free beekeeping while out here in 2011 for the NBA Conference, we realised that at that time, Randy was  in the business of producing nucs for which he was able to charge a premium, so was able to cost in brood breaks, so this would not really translate to viable beekeeping for those who are reliant on pollination and a honey crop. 

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Posted (edited)
46 minutes ago, Sailabee said:

so was able to cost in brood breaks,

 

Anything that Ive read regarding treatment free beekeeping relies heavily on brood breaks and anyone who raises queens will know that the nucs those queens are raised in have barely a mite in them for the entire queen raising period purely off the back of brood breaks.

To me treatment free beekeeping is an entirely different thing to varroa resistant or tolerant bees .

I don’t believe anyone has varroa tolerant bees that can survive without adding brood breaks into the mix. 

 

Quote

wouldnt be surprised if there were even cases like that in new zealand (and keeping quiet about it for obvious reasons)

 

What obvious reasons ?

Edited by frazzledfozzle
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