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APINZ CANTERBURY HUB - INFO & MEETING DATES JULY TO JANUARY

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APINZ CANTERBURY HUB

http://www.apinzcanterbury.org.nz/index.php

 

Our Hub covers southern Marlborough, Canterbury, Northern Otago, Westland and Chatham Island.  We hold hub meetings throughout the year, targeting grass roots issues, and on topics as requested by members.  We try to move our meeting venues around.  We like to visit a honey plant annually.  Our largest yearly event is the Beekeepers’ Day Out; generally held May.

 

All are welcome to our meetings and a month prior to each meeting, online bookings open on our Hub website; noted above.

 

Our committee are all volunteers in busy jobs, but we are happy to answer any queries, including related to this post, via admin@apinzcanterbury.org.nz

 

The August meeting by Hub member demand is our annual honey house visit, hive reports, a speaker on glyphosate with panel discussion.

 

Our hive reports consist of each meeting attendee reporting on the health and management of their hives.

 

Recently there have been court cases in the States concerning glyphosate; in which defendants have been awarded billions $.  It has also come to Hub attention, that recent exports of high-grade NZ manuka were rejected at the European border due to glyphosate levels exceeding European Union maximum residue levels. 

 

As plans for our September and November Hub meetings unfold, we will update this post. 

 

 

 

HUB MEETING DIARY JULY TO JANURY

ALL WELCOME BUT ONLINE REGISTRATION FOR MEETINGS, VISITS & MEALS REQUIRED

MEALS CANCELLED AFTER 10.00 A.M. ON THE DAY WILL BE INVOICED

 

JULY: NO MEETING

 

TUESDAY 27 AUGUST: ONLINE BOOKINGS OPEN 1 AUGUST

BRAND NEW HONEY PROCESSING PLANT TOUR, SCIENTIFIC SPEAKER - GLYPHOSATE & OTHER CHEMICAL RESIDUES DISCUSSION, HIVE REPORTS & MEAL

 

3.30PM: Rod & Jo Dreaver, Bee My Honey NZ Ltd, 151 Tancreds Road, Lincoln Area 7672

BRING YOUR OWN CHAIR and thermals!  We’ll have a diesel heater full throttle.  No open toed footwear in honey house.  Attendees will be broken into groups of six with guided tour by Rod.

From 19 years of age, with two hives of his own in his parents’ backyard, Rod has worked as a commercial beekeeper.  This has included over 11 years with Hantz Honey Ltd, 18 months with Airborne Honey Ltd, a couple of seasons in Canada and one the USA.  In 2002 Rod and wife Jo, purchased 350 hives and a year later another 350 hives, whilst Rod continued to work part time at Hantz’.  Bee My Honey has been a full-time business for this couple, since 2004, along with their three young children. 

Finally, after several ups along with downs, Rod and Jo have finally managed to build their own processing plant at Lincoln.  The storage shed was built in 2018, and on 5 April 2019 their new processing plant obtained an RMP.  https://beemyhoneynz.com/about/

 

4.30 PM: Discussion “Glyphosate & Other Chemical Residues In Honey & Other Bee Products. Where Are They Coming From & What Can Beekeepers Do About It?”

Chair: Martin Laas, scientist & commercial beekeeping employee Midlands Apiaries.  Member ApiNZ Science & Research Focus Group.  Hub committee member

 

Speaker:  Dr Don MacLeod

Don MacLeod’s working background was in the chemical industry, with the old DuPont Company where he worked in Agrichemicals and then Specialty Chemicals throughout the Asia Pacific region. He has a lifelong interest and participation in New Zealand Agriculture.  Don is an amateur beekeeper.  Since 2011 he is an active member of the Apiculture NZ Science and Research Focus Group and before that the NBA Technical Committee.  His role has been writing and presenting submissions to the EPA and MPI on pesticides and how they can be used safely alongside responsible beekeeping. Over the past 12 months he has been involved in a number of discussions on own use of organic acids and concerns about detection of pesticide residues in bee products.  Don is meant to be retired, but it hasn’t worked out that way!  He lives on a 30-acre lifestyle block in Franklin, and still uses chemicals for weed control, animal drenching, varroa control and fly strike control.

 

Panel Discussion:

Don MacLeod: (chemical residues)

Jo Townshend: Research Manager, Midlands Seed Ltd (seed production)

Duncan Lash: Specialist Advisor, MPI (food safety)

John Hartnell: Hartnell & Associates (honey sales & marketing)

 

Hive Reports: The time will determine whether these take place at Bee My Honey (prior to guest speaker or post panel discussion), or over our meal. 

 

6.00 PM FOR 6.30 PM MEAL: The Laboratory, 17 West Belt, Lincoln. $30 pp tapas menu & bar

 

Bookings Open 1 August, Close 22 August or earlier if restaurant capacity reached: So, we get the logistics right for Bee My Honey tour and restaurant, we would appreciate early bookings.   Restaurant space available for reserved diners only.  

The August Hub meetings the last two years have been the largest attendance of our regular Hub meetings.  Beekeepers, being very keen on varroa and AFB updates in their areas.  We talk openly about AFB in every Hub meeting.  The Selwyn District, Mid Canterbury, AFB outbreak a few months ago was identified thanks to reports from two different commercial beekeeper Hub members raising their concerns, at one of our meetings, about AFB of unknown origin that they found in two different areas. 

 

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TUESDAY 24 SEPTEMBER 6.30 PM: Speaker & venue to be advised

OCTOBER: No meeting

TUESDAY 26 NOVEMBER 6.30 PM: Beekeeping Business Management – Speaker to be advised.  Darfield Hotel (we had a great meal at this establishment in February)

DECEMBER & JANUARY: No meeting

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REPLACEMENT PANELLIST TUESDAY 27 AUGUST

 

John Hartnell unavailable.  Replacement is:

Airborne Honey Ltd: (honey packing, sales & marketing)

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CANTERBURY HUB UPDATES

 

TUESDAY 24 SEPTEMBER:

BEE PATHOGENS WORKSHOP – HOW TO MEASURE THEM & HOW DO THEY AFFECT HIVE HEALTH?

Online bookings open 24 August

 

VENUE: First Floor, Crate & Barrel, 3 Market Street, Leeston

6.30 pm – 7 pm: ALCOHOL WASHES & SUGAR SHAKE MONITORING OF VARROA LEVELS

Rae Butler, Bee Smart Breeding, VSH Specialist, Ashburton

Martin Laas, Research Apiarist, Midland Apiaries, Ashburton

7pm – 7.15 pm: Q&A

7.15pm: MEAL: Buffet selection of pizzas, nachos, wedges, salads, mud cake.  Approximately $25 pp - size of group will determine if cheaper

7.45 pm: MICROSCOPY TESTING FOR NOSEMA: Rae Butler

Some Nosema microscopy slides will be projected onto a screen.  If people want, they can bring their own samples – 30 to 60 bees from the entrance of the hive collected the day of this meeting into a zip or snap lock bag, or container.  Bees to be dead on arrival at Hub meeting!  If harvesting bees earlier, freeze on collection day and remove from freezer on meeting day. 

 

OCTOBER: No Meeting

 

TUESDAY 26 NOVEMBER END OF YEAR DINNER:

Online bookings open 26 October

VENUE: Darfield Hotel, South Tce, (SH73), Darfield

 

BEEKEEPING BUSINESS MANAGEMENT – SPEAKER TO BE ADVISED

START: 6.30 pm for 7.00 pm meal.  Menu & price to be advised

               

**************************************************************************************************************************************************

 

EXPRESSIONS OF INTEREST FOR SPONSORSHIP/ADVERTISING – CANTERBURY HUB WEBSITE:

https://www.apinzcanterbury.org.nz/

 

Earlier this year, our website was established for the committee to communicate with its members, providing an opportunity for new and existing members to keep up to date with upcoming events and activities. It has provided a practical tool for people to register and pay for various meetings and events throughout the year.

We have come a long way; however, we still need your support. If any business, organisation or individual is interested in sponsoring the website through advertising then your generous contribution will help us extend our coverage and presence while providing an amazing opportunity to showcase your business.

Three rotating slots available, each with a one-off fee, expiring the date of our 2020 Beekeepers' Day Out. For more information or to register your interest please contact Carolyn McMahon by 15 August.  carolyn@hantzhoney.co.nz  or 027 204 6899

WE ARE KEEN AS EXORT HONEY TO HEAR FROM YOU!

*************************************************************************************************************************************************

 

COLONY LOSS SURVEY:  At a recent Hub meeting a member asked for clarification around how some hive deaths are recorded in the survey, if they died outside the winter period. It was also queried if the survey was the same in other countries (because we are comparing ourselves with other countries)? The Hub member mentioned they had lost hives before winter that didn’t count in this survey.  The survey was only for the winter months where not much happens, but you can also have losses coming out of winter, when hives can dwindle away and not get going in the early spring.

We contacted Pike Brown with this question, receiving the following response:

 MPI commissioned us to survey winter losses, which is defined as losses between 1 June and whenever the hives are opened for the first spring round. This is exactly what COLOSS measures for winter in the northern hemisphere.

Summer losses are also significant – possibly more significant in NZ – so we also include some information about that in the survey even though that isn’t the focus. Specifically, we record how many hives were alive on 1 June 2018 (this is part of the winter loss calculation). Later in the survey, we ask how many viable colonies there were in the first spring round of 2017, we ask about acquisitions between then and 1 June 2018, and we ask about sales over the same period. So we can get an indication of losses over summer from that (at least if we ignore splits and other things not covered above). We don’t, however, go into any detail about the nature of losses outside of winter.

If you have ideas for questions that we should be asking to better cover losses during the season, I’d be grateful to hear them!” BrownP@landcareresearch.co.nz

**************************************************************************************************************************************************

REMINDERS FOR HUB MEETINGS: Previously email reminders were sent ten days prior to Hub meetings.  To cut down on committee work, this will not happen.  So, either reserve your space when bookings open, or diary closure dates or keep an eye on our Hub website. 

 

ATTENDING HUB MEETINGS: The Hub committee do understand that it is not always practical for people to attend the meal component of meetings.  Out of respect for our hosts and paying attendees, we request if you are only attending the meeting, you buy a beverage.  We do not pay rental at these venues and in country areas, businesses survive with support from their immediate local community.

NEXT E-NEWS TO MEMBERS: Approximately 1 September

 

QUESTION: WHAT DO YOU CALL A BEE THAT LIVES IN AMERICA?

ANSWER: A USB:IMG_0386:

 

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The threat of Pesticides: Be warned, NZ needs to get control of the pesticide industry like Denmark did and tax pesticides at source so government can fund research with the proceeds.  In the UK Tony Blair did a deal with the pesticide industry to voluntarily regulate itself.  He got elected and now university research is funded by, and delivers, the results the pesticide manufacturers want to hear.

We are running a scheme in South Oxfordshire UK where local farmers, golf courses, pest control companies are using smart phone apps to record pesticide applications as part of their existing countryside stewardship schemes and HSE regulations.. 

These are immediately notified on a map on the app to bee keepers and bystanders displaying both treatments and locations of apiaries.  The notification displays a Toxicity indication in the form of traffic lights for 6 environmental health groups humans, fish, bees, bumble bees, birds and aquatic insects derived from the Uni of Hertfordshire’s pesticide research.

The fundamental aim of the system is to educate pesticide users and collect valuable data on cause and effect links, be it bee deaths or us, in the food we eat and the 21st C diseases caused by the pesticides in it.

The problem in the UK is the unhealthy influence the pesticide Industry has and supposedly reputable organisations like the Institute of Hydrology and Ecology, who run a honey quality testing program which inexplicably "ran out of money" when it came to pesticide tests for the honey submitted. The program is funded by the pesticide industry and the top man is funded by Syngenta.  Unbelievably they did tell us that our bees, and others, had been foraging on ... wait for it ... peanuts! 

Unfortunately, the British Bee Keepers Association support an initiative funded by the pesticide industry that only reports on Insecticides.    At the start of this year (March) we lost 75,000 bees from 3 colonies. Our apiary of 17 colonies was fully inspected immediately by the Govt. National Bee Unit and they could find no diseases or varroa.

It took them had them 4 months to get the dead bees tested, and the only noticeable level of any chemical found was a fungicide which under the BBKA promoted scheme does not need to be notified to bee keepers.

The system, amongst other things  manages swarms without the need for telephone calls sending swarm images, individual hive registration and delivers colony loss reporting, geospacially, as it happens, i.e. in real time.  The system www.bee.watch is approved in the UK by Red Tractor and the system security by the UK Police. 

 

Education is the key so support and attend the Canterbury Hub.

 

 

Capture.PNG

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3 hours ago, Norm said:

Be warned, NZ needs to get control of the pesticide industry like Denmark did

Please explain why only Demark has done anything when the rest of Europe carries on regardless.

There is no way I would allow my apiaries to be publically broadcast on some cell phone app.

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Posted (edited)
12 hours ago, Norm said:

we lost 75,000 bees from 3 colonies

So they lost 3 hives, or some bees from 3 hives. the hysteria around 75000bees makes a dull story just a tad less dull.

Now if it was 75000 hives, a bit different.

Edited by Dennis Crowley
  • Agree 1

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28 minutes ago, Dennis Crowley said:

So they lost 3 hives, or some bees from 3 hives. the hysteria around 75000bees makes a dull story just a tad less dull.

Now if it was 75000 hives, a bit different.

Yep, A pretty big yawn. 

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On ‎9‎/‎08‎/‎2019 at 5:43 AM, Norm said:

The threat of Pesticides: Be warned, NZ needs to get control of the pesticide industry like Denmark did and tax pesticides at source so government can fund research with the proceeds.  In the UK Tony Blair did a deal with the pesticide industry to voluntarily regulate itself.  He got elected and now university research is funded by, and delivers, the results the pesticide manufacturers want to hear.

 

We are running a scheme in South Oxfordshire UK where local farmers, golf courses, pest control companies are using smart phone apps to record pesticide applications as part of their existing countryside stewardship schemes and HSE regulations.. 

 

These are immediately notified on a map on the app to bee keepers and bystanders displaying both treatments and locations of apiaries.  The notification displays a Toxicity indication in the form of traffic lights for 6 environmental health groups humans, fish, bees, bumble bees, birds and aquatic insects derived from the Uni of Hertfordshire’s pesticide research.

 

The fundamental aim of the system is to educate pesticide users and collect valuable data on cause and effect links, be it bee deaths or us, in the food we eat and the 21st C diseases caused by the pesticides in it.

 

The problem in the UK is the unhealthy influence the pesticide Industry has and supposedly reputable organisations like the Institute of Hydrology and Ecology, who run a honey quality testing program which inexplicably "ran out of money" when it came to pesticide tests for the honey submitted. The program is funded by the pesticide industry and the top man is funded by Syngenta.  Unbelievably they did tell us that our bees, and others, had been foraging on ... wait for it ... peanuts! 

 

Unfortunately, the British Bee Keepers Association support an initiative funded by the pesticide industry that only reports on Insecticides.    At the start of this year (March) we lost 75,000 bees from 3 colonies. Our apiary of 17 colonies was fully inspected immediately by the Govt. National Bee Unit and they could find no diseases or varroa.

 

It took them had them 4 months to get the dead bees tested, and the only noticeable level of any chemical found was a fungicide which under the BBKA promoted scheme does not need to be notified to bee keepers.

 

The system, amongst other things  manages swarms without the need for telephone calls sending swarm images, individual hive registration and delivers colony loss reporting, geospacially, as it happens, i.e. in real time.  The system www.bee.watch is approved in the UK by Red Tractor and the system security by the UK Police. 

 

Education is the key so support and attend the Canterbury Hub.

Kia ora Norm

 

Thanks very much for your supportive post from half way round the world; encouraging beekeepers to attend our Canterbury Hub Tuesday 27 August meeting.  The more people contributing and listening to the discussion, all the better.

 

What happens in Denmark, the UK, South Oxfordshire is extremely interesting, but it is not a direct part of the topic we will be dealing with on 27 August.  Nevertheless, NZ beekeepers must learn from these situations, because methods of resolution overseas maybe transferrable to NZ, and our industry should cherry pick from these solutions.   

 

Dead bee samples should be tested ASAP after collection.  We agree that the alleged four months is too long, and perhaps in another incident the horse may bolt with potentially devastating consequences. 

 

Your link to the Bee Watch is informative.

 

FYI here is the URL for the NZ government Environmental Protection Authority pollinator incident form:

https://www.epa.govt.nz/everyday-environment/animals-and-insects/bees/pollinator-incident-report-form/

 

Ngā mihi

 

 

 

 

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