Jump to content

Recommended Posts

Wonder if there is any beekeeping news on display this year at Mystery Creek Fieldays couldn't find anything yet. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, I'd love to hear from anyone exhibiting industry related goods/information/equipment at FD2019.... still trying to decide if I will head up??

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

Bee related exhibits at feildays 

 

Innovation Center

MyApiary - Extraction management - Booth INNO37

Flow- Honey on tap - Booth INNO38

Bee-IQ - Hive Gate - Booth INNO34

 

Main Hall

Argisea - Bee nutrition 

 

Edited by DJBainbridge

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Found an interesting site there today marketing a product called 'dynavyte'. A probiotic type supplement they call a bit'microbiome supplement' mostly used for cattle, sheep and horses but being trialled on bees. Apparently in spore form which makes it heat stable and only becomes active when in the gut of the host. When fed to bees mixed with sugar syrup, apparently the bees are fatter, live longer and the hives are much quieter to work (really?) and queens raised on it have big butts... have bought a bottle to feed to my orphan lambs and a few lucky beehives...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Does anyone know how bees managed 100 yrs or so ago before supplements were available . 

Were bees less healthy or did beeks feed supplements then too .

Do any of the older beeks on the forum know what were the procedures then .

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, kaihoka said:

Does anyone know how bees managed 100 yrs or so ago before supplements were available . 

Were bees less healthy or did beeks feed supplements then too .

Do any of the older beeks on the forum know what were the procedures then .

Bees don't need supplements when they are kept in sustainable numbers. Put too many bees in one place and there will be times of the year when they struggle to forage for what they need.

I doubt that 100 years ago we had more beehives in an area than that area could sustain. Generating more beehives was almost all done by collecting swarms from existing and feral colonies (i.e. the bees decided when more colonies could be in an area). Beehives would not have been moved around to chase flows. 

The number of beehives an area can sustain obviously changes drastically with changes in land use so there will be large differences there for many places between now and 100 years ago.

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 2
  • Agree 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, kaihoka said:

Does anyone know how bees managed 100 yrs or so ago before supplements were available . 

Were bees less healthy or did beeks feed supplements then too .

Do any of the older beeks on the forum know what were the procedures then .

I won't claim to be the oldest or most experienced Bk on here, but I suspect that in the 'old days' beekeeping was a more leisurely affair with not so much pressure put on the bees  by their owners to perform.

Business's were owned by families who rolled with the seasons, rather than 'Business' men whose blood pressure went up when the predicted returns never happened.

I would suggest that the bees will survive quite happily without the supplements .... and if they don't, then perhaps the location and natural forage available is not upto speed, so shift 'em down the road a couple of k's .....

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
  • Agree 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If the Old Days was 46 years ago, at that time i was working for Bray and Gosset in the Canterbury plains. Not a lot of hives were moved seasonally, we moved a hundred or two (i think) into the Rakaia George through summer, as Jasper Bray believed it was too harsh for them up there in the winter. Some got moved in and out of beech forests and we did a tiny bit of pollination also. But most hives were permanent. Pollen supplements were not fed, and even sugar was fairly minimal, wintering down hives was mostly done with combs of honey if they didn't have enough.

However during the time I was there, the farmers on the plains started pulling out the gorse hedges that were common on every farm then. Jasper started to worry about pollen and talking about supplementary feed. Best I know, no commercially made supplements were available then, but we made some kind of home brew i can't remember the recipe, and experimentally plonked it into a bunch of hives.

As memory serves, we didn't see a benefit. But after I left and gorse continued to be removed, it may have become more important but i don't know. James, who was involved with them after me, may know?

  • Like 4
  • Agree 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

There were a whole bunch of us .... Halkett, Sheehans, Ridd, Benseman , White's, not to mention all the girls in the packhouse under the watchfull eye and humour of Mr Ball .... to name a few, and of course the Big Bee Peter .....

We bought 117 hives of Hantz's and 600 hives of Airborne in 1992 , down in the  Norwood and Te Perita district of the plains  and up the Rakaia Gorge.  Te Perita was the golden triangle for the bees, willow, gorse, wild cherry , clover, followed by Nodder.  We use to do a lot of cut comb honey there.

The gorge was always a bit of a luck an a draw, drying out quickly in the Nor'West, or getting soaked with the rain and the bees starving.

 

In the end we pulled out of Te Perita ..... the Dairy farms expanded, the nectar sources got pulled out and it  became a desert of green cow poo.

But lets not wax too lyrical  about the good old days...... These are the good old days ......

 

Edited by jamesc
  • Like 3
  • Agree 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ridd the Kid, that's what he had written on his bee veil hat LOL. 😄

 

I heard what happened to most of the others, but not him. Is he still in bees, or what?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, kaihoka said:

Does anyone know how bees managed 100 yrs or so ago before supplements were available . 

Were bees less healthy or did beeks feed supplements then too .

Do any of the older beeks on the forum know what were the procedures then .

I think 100 years ago, 1920s the bees were doing ok, only 15% of the hives we have now.

Mary Bumby, the sister of a Methodist missionary introduced honey bees to New Zealand. She brought two hives ashore when she landed at the Mangungu Mission Station at Hokianga in March 1839.

The commercial production of honey in New Zealand began during the late 1870s following the introduction of the Langstroth hive, the boxed-framed beehive model still used today.

There were about 100,000 hives in New Zealand by the end of the 1920s. Beekeeping flourished again after the Second World War, and in 1950 there were some 7,000 beekeepers with 150,000 hives.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, Dennis Crowley said:

I think 100 years ago, 1920s the bees were doing ok, only 15% of the hives we have now.

Mary Bumby, the sister of a Methodist missionary introduced honey bees to New Zealand. She brought two hives ashore when she landed at the Mangungu Mission Station at Hokianga in March 1839.

The commercial production of honey in New Zealand began during the late 1870s following the introduction of the Langstroth hive, the boxed-framed beehive model still used today.

There were about 100,000 hives in New Zealand by the end of the 1920s. Beekeeping flourished again after the Second World War, and in 1950 there were some 7,000 beekeepers with 150,000 hives.

 

Do you know what the average yield per hive was in 20s through to the 50s.

Was it less or more than today . ?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 minutes ago, kaihoka said:

Do you know what the average yield per hive was in 20s through to the 50s.

Was it less or more than today . ?

Not sure that far back, 1980- 233810 hives avg production 32kg/hive, 2015- 575872 hives, avg production 34kg/hive, 2018-879758 hives, avg production, 23kg/hive. 

figures are from Airborne website, only go back as far as 1980.

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One of ours sheds here is an old honey house . I'm guessing it's about 90 years old . It used to be full of Clydesdale gear for haymaking , which went to museums 30 years ago .

I can't go back in time and ask , but from what I understand, individual farmers kept their own bees . Unfortunately there are no pictures and I don't know what they did with their honey , but it would have been sold as additional income. Ours was one of the first dairy farms here and the first to use fertiliser way back when ....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Alastair said:

Ridd the Kid, that's what he had written on his bee veil hat LOL. 😄

 

I heard what happened to most of the others, but not him. Is he still in bees, or what?

 

I do all Ridd's queens and cells (and he ain't no kid now).  He has down scaled the last couple of years.  He can always be found at the Riccarton market.   

  • Agree 1
  • Good Info 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I wouldn't have said that beekeeping was more laid-back in the good old days. You had to run so many hives to make a living that you were always chasing your own but . I certainly saw more starved hives in the good old days when sometimes you just couldn't get around fast enough. Production has gone up steadily in the last 60 years up until the last few years when it has started to decline. This increase is undoubtedly  down to better beekeeping and better bees as floral sources have not improved and in many cases have declined.. Feeding sugar syrup is probably necessary but it is debatable whether it is best practice. Adding anything to that syrup for whatever reason is I believe extremely doubtful as some of it will end up in your honey. My averages are certainly way above the national average and except for a few trials I don't feed any magic formulas to my hives and only give pollen substitute to a handful of sites once or twice in the spring and I think I'll stop doing that as well.

Varoa has certainly been a game changer but hives had Nosema and sometimes hundreds would die from if you did something wrong and I haven't seen anything like that for a long long time.

  • Like 4
  • Good Info 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, M4tt said:

One of ours sheds here is an old honey house . I'm guessing it's about 90 years old . It used to be full of Clydesdale gear for haymaking , which went to museums 30 years ago .

I can't go back in time and ask , but from what I understand, individual farmers kept their own bees . Unfortunately there are no pictures and I don't know what they did with their honey , but it would have been sold as additional income. Ours was one of the first dairy farms here and the first to use fertiliser way back when ....

Do you have clover on your farm .

Why did dairy farmers stop using clover .

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, kaihoka said:

Do you have clover on your farm .

Why did dairy farmers stop using clover .

Too much nitrogen ?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, yesbut said:

Too much nitrogen ?

They use urea instead  now , I wondered why 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
56 minutes ago, Maggie James said:

 

I do all Ridd's queens and cells (and he ain't no kid now).  He has down scaled the last couple of years.  He can always be found at the Riccarton market.   

 

Thanks Maggie, Paul was a decent guy i always wondered how he ended up.

 

A funny story, one day he got a bit cheeky with Tony Tairoa the shed boss at the time. So Tony incited a few of the guys to throw  him in the water trough behind the smoko shed. He was yanked out but once there he decided he just wasn't going in and fought like a tiger, in the end they got one foot in and that was it. He did not take it in good humour and went stomping off with one squelchy foot and telling everyone just what he thought of them. 😄 

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, john berry said:

Feeding sugar syrup is probably necessary but it is debatable whether it is best practice. Adding anything to that syrup for whatever reason is I believe extremely doubtful as some of it will end up in your honey.

The problem with science is it is a double sided coin. On the one side it can detect the smallest bug/virus that may help in our fight against any number of diseases, mites etc, on the other side it can detect the smallest particle of whatever we feed the bees with in our concoctions mixed into sugar or sprayed on frames or into pollen patties etc,

Heard not long ago milk products, which have come from pollen sub, tested in honey, can you call that honey dairy free?

We do need to watch what we are feeding our bees, and be asking our suppliers of these products the question, what is this made from, because you can bet it can/may be picked up when tested.

  • Like 1
  • Agree 1
  • Good Info 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, kaihoka said:

Do you have clover on your farm .

Why did dairy farmers stop using clover .

Yes, loads of clover all year round.

Dairy farmers have never stopped using clover . The urea used is additional Nitrogen on top of what the clover fixes. Rhizobium bacteria do not fix nitrogen from that atmosphere all year round . They are seasonal producers , so the artificial N plugs the gaps. 

 

Clover has been susceptible to several pests over the years that have a good go at wiping it out. Clover flea, clover root weevil to name a couple. 

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 1
  • Good Info 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 8/06/2019 at 3:47 PM, FizzyBeez said:

Yes, I'd love to hear from anyone exhibiting industry related goods/information/equipment at FD2019.... still trying to decide if I will head up??

Bit late now as one day left only. Sean from BeeIQ here. We have been hectically busy talking to bee people in the Innovation Centre about HiveGate. Being Fieldays,  there are maybe 85% hobbyists and 15% commercial. Every conversation has been fascinating to our stand visitors. 

 

In 2 weeks time we will be at APINZ conference and encourage any of you to come over and meet us, we really do enjoy sharing our experiences regarding bee robbing and wasp control. Some of you have experienced this already 👍.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 13/06/2019 at 10:48 PM, kaihoka said:

Does anyone know how bees managed 100 yrs or so ago before supplements were available . 

Were bees less healthy or did beeks feed supplements then too .

Do any of the older beeks on the forum know what were the procedures then .

Same as to day keep hive dry ,ventilated, area with a mixed supply of pollen and nectar. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Far 

8 hours ago, Graeme Hunter said:

Same as to day keep hive dry ,ventilated, area with a mixed supply of pollen and nectar. 

Far, far  less hives that's how. 

I was always taught not to have more than 20hives per 3km radius then I went and worked commercially and found people were putting sites of 36+ 1km apart

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...