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Still in the drawing board stage, but some knowledgeable people working on this.

 

QUOTE - 

The basis of the innovation is quite simple. When the queen bee eats something with pathogens in it, the pathogen signature molecules are bound by vitellogenin. Vitellogenin then carries these signature molecules into the queen’s eggs, where they work as inducers for future immune responses.

Before this, no-one had thought that insect vaccination could be possible at all. That is because the insect immune system, although rather similar to the mammalian system, lacks one of the central mechanisms for immunological memory – antibodies.
"Now we've discovered the mechanism to show that you can actually vaccinate them. You can transfer a signal from one generation to another," researcher Dalial Freitak states......

PrimeBEE's first aim is to develop a vaccine against American foulbrood, a bacterial disease caused by the spore-forming Paenibacillus larvae ssp. larvae. American foulbrood is the most widespread and destructive of the bee brood diseases.
 
"We hope that we can also develop a vaccination against other infections, such as European foulbrood and fungal diseases. We have already started initial tests. The plan is to be able to vaccinate against any microbe".

https://www.helsinki.fi/en/news/sustainability-news/the-first-ever-insect-vaccine-primebee-helps-bees-stay-healthy

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Wow! Wouldn’t that be something. 

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I hope its only the Queen that requires vaccinating and that her immune response is transmitted to the offspring she lays.  I cant imagine we are all going to be attacking our bees individually with a hypodermic needle?  Very interesting all the same.

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According to their experiments with moths, if the moth was fed a vaccine, she passed on resistance to her eggs and the progeny that came from them.

 

So they are hoping it will be the same for bees. IE, feed a vaccine to the queen, then she passes on resistance to the offspring.

 

Sounds so good it can't be true, and maybe it won't pan out. But, here's hoping. 🙂

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