Jump to content

Recommended Posts

I got some of these in the shed and was just wondering if any one use's these any more, they came with some hives i picked up a few years and have a box of frames that these fit into. As far as i know you soak these in water until they soften enough to be able to bend them around into a square and then lock it together, you get i think 4 of these fit into one frame,

I would think you would need a strong hive or a good flow going as you would need these to be filled quickly so they are kept nice and clean,

Would be interested to know if any one else use's or have used these in the past :)

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 4
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Days

Top Posters In This Topic

Yes, I have. Quite difficult actually, bees don't like 'em because they can't hold the temperature up. They have tin, zinc, or wood dividers between the faces (so they are all the same depth) making for a very narrow bee-space. You need a very strong hive, on a flow. One old boy told me, 'you pour a beer and pull up a chair, when the ######s come out, you put them back in again, and when they come out again...' you get the idea.

The sections fitted into a section rack (a 'crate'), four to a row, 28 to the rack, the rack sits on the excluder. For showing sections travel stain is a problem, you have to remove propolis, they have to entirely capped, and, they were designed to weigh 16oz exactly. Very difficult to get that. Some guys would take two years, draw them out one year, then fling them in (many more than you need) to get them filled then out again straight away. Select the best ones. If you draw them and fill them in one season they can get too dirty. Italian bees made poor sections, because the cappings don't stand proud enough they look a bit 'oily.' You want bees who produce very white wax with a very slight air space under the cap. Its a real art, I admire anyone who can do it, I can't.

There were smaller sets, I think in threes, that fitted a frame and went in with cut comb frames, but they were never up to standard.

Selling them was a pain (although they got a lot of money) because the were all individually weighed and priced.

Give it shot, I know I would! :)

Link to post
Share on other sites

it would be over 25 years since I last produced section honey but we used to do thousands of boxes every year. We used full depth frames, 7 to the box with eight sections per frame. It is vital to have two fairly wide strips of tin on one side of each frame and the whole lot is kept in place with two sticks wedged together. The sections were made up by pouring boiling water along the fold points and then covering with a wet sack to give them time to soften. White Pine made by far the best sections but radiata pine is the only available product at the moment. You need to make up a jig consisting of a board large enough to hold eight sections with blocks of wood half the depth of the section and a bit smaller than the internal dimensions of the section attached at suitable intervals. Using a hot iron you need to melt a large piece of thin super foundation to the top of the section and a thin strip on the bottom. We never used excluders and the section boxes normally went on as a fourth box. Even in a good year it was sometimes hard to get them filled and hives had to be in perfect condition. They were a huge amount of work but at the time the only honey you were allowed to export from New Zealand was comb honey. With changing times they simply became uneconomic .

You need very strong hives, very good honey flows and you need to leave them on long enough to be fully sealed but get them off before they get travel stained. If the season does not progress as you hoped it often pays to remove undrawn frames and store them carefully until the following year but anything that is partially drawn should be cut out.it can be worthwhile to extract unsealed section honey and then save one drawn section for every box you want to put on to encourage the bees into the box. This section should be marked and not used for sale although it would be fine for your own consumption. Although you are more likely to fill them by putting them on as a third box you will get much cleaner sections if you put them on as a fourth box. Two Queen hives can be particularly good at filling comb honey.our Italian bees made beautiful cappings in general but there was the odd hive that didn't leave an air gap under the capping. This trait is fairly easily selected against. There is still a demand for section honey but the economics are very doubtful. It is however a fun thing to do

Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...