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Would anyone care to share their experience of K-wing either locally or overseas?

 

Large numbers of bees with splayed wings, unable to fly. In last 24hrs the degree of splay has increased to what you see in the photo. This matches photos I've seen from overseas that we're reported to be K-wing due to tracheal mites. Tracheal mites haven't been found in NZ so this may be some other disease. 

 

I've taken a sample of affected bees and will contact the agency for guidance. Meanwhile, I'm keen to understand more about what this might be. 

Screenshot_20190503-163906_Photos.jpg

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Do we welcome you back Rob or is this an aberration ?

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Posted (edited)

Hopefully this isn't what it looks like. I need to cast the net as wide as I can. 

 

A little less concerned now. 

 

The Beekeeper's Handbook By Diana Sammataro, Alphonse Avitabile, page 136, describes K-wing as a possible symptom of type I CPV and of tracheal mites independently. 

Edited by Rob Stockley

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1 hour ago, Rob Stockley said:

Hopefully this isn't what it looks like. I need to cast the net as wide as I can. 

 

A little less concerned now. 

 

The Beekeeper's Handbook By Diana Sammataro, Alphonse Avitabile, page 136, describes K-wing as a possible symptom of type I CPV and of tracheal mites independently. 

It certainly doesn't look like my 'unconfirmed ' type 1 CBPV bees, who display a V wing formation 

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46 minutes ago, M4tt said:

It certainly doesn't look like my 'unconfirmed ' type 1 CBPV bees, who display a V wing formation 

Neither do they exhibit the classic tremble that goes with CBPV. I've reported to MPI and expect a call back from a specialist in the next day or so. 

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I've heard of K'wing but never seen it. Hopefully MPI will react swiftly and it will turn out to be nothing . Just make sure they know it's potentially very serious and insist they act as quickly as possible.

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4 hours ago, Rob Stockley said:

Would anyone care to share their experience of K-wing either locally or overseas?

 

Large numbers of bees with splayed wings, unable to fly. In last 24hrs the degree of splay has increased to what you see in the photo. This matches photos I've seen from overseas that we're reported to be K-wing due to tracheal mites. Tracheal mites haven't been found in NZ so this may be some other disease. 

 

I've taken a sample of affected bees and will contact the agency for guidance. Meanwhile, I'm keen to understand more about what this might be. 

Screenshot_20190503-163906_Photos.jpg

I don't think a virus is responsible for what we are seeing here.  It could be an insecticide that caused the wings to unhinge, or something worse. 

6 minutes ago, David Yanke said:

I don't think a virus is responsible for what we are seeing here.  It could be an insecticide that caused the wings to unhinge, or something worse. 

The more I think about this the more worried I get.  Call the MPI Hotline if you want some action straight away over the weekend.  Let's hope they have been just exposed to an insecticide.

 

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Posted (edited)

Call back came within about 10min. Coming tomorrow morning to collect samples for analysis. I'll post follow up when available @john berry @David Yanke

Edited by Rob Stockley
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Tell them to collect your multiple samples Rob, as viruses are tested in Wellington and tracheal mites are done in Auckland. 

Good job calling the hotline

If I had to bet, I would say it is high levels of CBPV. The good thing is that we - and MPI lab - use the qPCR method so yes, like a manuka honey sample, these bees will generate a Cq . . . and I predict it will be about 17 ( viral load in the millions). 

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MPI agent came by this morning to collect samples. Indeed some are bound for Auckland for tracheal mite analysis. The others are bound for Wallaceville for virology analysis. 

 

There is now clear evidence of trembling which is symptomatic of CBPV. Much less pronounced than I recall it but trembling for sure. So another vote for CBPV and reduced likelihood of TM.

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2 hours ago, Rob Stockley said:

MPI agent came by this morning to collect samples. Indeed some are bound for Auckland for tracheal mite analysis. The others are bound for Wallaceville for virology analysis. 

 

There is now clear evidence of trembling which is symptomatic of CBPV. Much less pronounced than I recall it but trembling for sure. So another vote for CBPV and reduced likelihood of TM.

If all the bees were as healthy looking as the one pictured, except for the K-wing, then I am still betting it isn't CBPV.  If there was heavy virus loading, then most of the bee would bee looking slick, and hairless, besides trembling.  The bee pictured was literally a picture  of health, with very healthy pubescence, but testing will tell.  Good on you for acting so quickly on this.

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Posted (edited)
3 hours ago, David Yanke said:

If all the bees were as healthy looking as the one pictured, except for the K-wing, then I am still betting it isn't CBPV.  If there was heavy virus loading, then most of the bee would bee looking slick, and hairless, besides trembling.  The bee pictured was literally a picture  of health, with very healthy pubescence, but testing will tell.  Good on you for acting so quickly on this.

I was of a similar opinion. But reading suggests there are two distinct manifestations of CBPV. In young bees their morphology is changing and the virus interferes with development. They take on a hairless, greasy appearance, they tremble and die in or near the hive. Older bees tremble and their flight muscles are compromised. They display the k-wing symptom and typically die meters from the hive entrance while heading out to forage. The onset of the virus for individual bees is apparently very quick - hours rather than days. The k-wing bees may look healthy because they were healthy a short time previous.

 

The last time I saw CBPV the majority of bees affected were younger bees. When I look back at photos I can find k-wing but only in small numbers. I didn't notice them at the time. 

 

This time I haven't noticed any hairless, greasy looking bees. Maybe this is a different variant of the virus that affects older bees. Indeed many of the bees crawling in the grass are very old with significant wear to the trailing edges of wings. Early afternoon,  the entrance almost looked normal as younger, evidently unaffected, bees took orientation flights.

 

Results of samples will be interesting. 

Edited by Rob Stockley
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We used to diagnose tracheal mites (acarine) in the field with a hand lens, a cork and a few pins. Pull or flick the head, first pair of legs, and first segment of the thorax off with forceps or a blade and with the lens and look for a pair of quite large white tubes heading down into the thorax towards the wing muscles. If they are discoloured from clean white opalescent tubes and show brown staining chances are it’s mites inside blocking the tube.

 

Of course a lab can do it neatly, and expose the individual mites to look at too, but there you go…

 

I doubt it's mites; all the varroa-killing magic we put in hives is probably killing all the Acari.

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Robbing set in this afternoon so I've closed them down for good. Wrap and freeze boxes then wait for the results.

 

The MPI expert sent me some info on a CBPV clinical trial. There's a note that says similar symptoms may be observed following low level exposure to fipronil. Food for thought. 

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On 5/05/2019 at 7:23 PM, Rob Stockley said:

Robbing set in this afternoon so I've closed them down for good. Wrap and freeze boxes then wait for the results.

 

The MPI expert sent me some info on a CBPV clinical trial. There's a note that says similar symptoms may be observed following low level exposure to fipronil. Food for thought. 


Any word back from MPI on those results???

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