Jump to content
jamesc

Winter projects.

Recommended Posts

One of the reasons I got into beekeeping was because I was attracted to the ebb and the flow of the seasonality of the craft....  working like a maniac through the spring and summer  as the bees build and grow , and then winding down in the autumn, preparing for a winter hibernation.

 

This is that "Sweet Time".  The days are still warm and the autumn colours shine in the late low light of the morning.   The crop is in the shed. The evenings are  drawing in and the bee work is about done. All that is left to do is to  replenish the firewood shed ... pick up the Venison salami from my new found butcher mate, and turn my attention to  Winter Project's that have been on my mind over the past summer.

 

One of them is our Carbon Footprint that we as a business leave as we rush around the country producing our honey.

 

Part of that project is cashing in on Shane Jones' One Billion Tree program .  A handout to plant more trees. How many hectares of scrub filled gully will we need to plant to offset the emissions of our lifestyle. ?

Which truck is more economical to run on the long hauls ..... the MAN 4x4 with it's euro 5 emmissions rating , or the Ford Stirling with it's higher payload and twice as economical on the gas ?

Or are we better of to leave all the bees on the Dew within a 20k radius of home and accept a lower price for our product which has been  produced at a lower cost ?

 

It's probably all been done before with the Food Miles thing ..... but I thought it might be an interesting excercise.

 

 

 

  • Like 2
  • Agree 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nice to see thoughts like this.

I live a semi green reduced footprint lifestyle -  yet my son is hi -tec science will replace the nature we destroy. Doesn't make for much agreement.🙁

 

Will you factor in the environmental cost of your product being exported?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Mummzie said:

Will you factor in the environmental cost of your product being exported?

I don't think his exports will make much of a splash, take a look at marine traffic.com to see all the ships & fishing boats out there, never mind the world's navies, and check out flightradar24.com and likewise check out all the aeroplanes in flight at any one time......global warming is here to stay unless there's to be total disruption of world trade.  We're actually stuffed.

  • Agree 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, yesbut said:

I don't think his exports will make much of a splash, take a look at marine traffic.com to see all the ships & fishing boats out there, never mind the world's navies, and check out flightradar24.com and likewise check out all the aeroplanes in flight at any one time......global warming is here to stay unless there's to be total disruption of world trade.  We're actually stuffed.

 As a species I don't think we are totally stuffed, but at some stage  in the not too distant future, with no change  we will have a different form of lifestyle forced upon us.  At the moment we have an opportunity  to say  what form that new lifestyle will take . We might end up subdividing hill country into lifestyle blocks to preserve the cropping land for food production  ...  or maybe we learn to live more locally, sharing transport , skills .... resources ....

With no change ..... then for sure, the roller coaster is rolling, gaining momentum for the big upside down loop when the planet takes it's revenge before settling down into a new found existence. Or something like that.

It's something our grandchildren will have to deal with , and as every generation knows .... we need to pass on skills learnt through the hard knocks so that others may benefit and not make the same mistakes.

A bit like the battle with Varroa .... we've taken some hard knocks, but are slowly getting it beaten into us that with the resources available to us ,more hives is not better ... less hives of better quality will win the day.

Edited by jamesc
  • Agree 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, yesbut said:

.  We're actually stuffed.

 

I totally agree....the problem with earths ecosystem is humans.

 

28 minutes ago, jamesc said:

It's something our grandchildren will have to deal with , and as every generation knows ..

 

Well I hope to be able to say to my grandchildren  that I tried ....(Knowing full well that by having them, I didn't follow my own solution.)

  • Agree 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, jamesc said:

 As a species I don't think we are totally stuffed, but at some stage  in the not too distant future, with no change  we will have a different form of lifestyle forced upon us.  

I like the beach life. With sea levels rising I am glad I bought in Putaruru, not much longer until I Have a beach front property 🤪🤣

  • Haha 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

what a load of nonsense, the world population will fit inside of NZ if we all lived as dense as they do in Manhatten, that leaves the rest of the world to grow our food. there is an estimated 15+billion acres of food growing land, the problem is distribution, consumerism, pollution and greed.

Gandhi said "the world is big enough for all our needs, but not big enough for all our greed"

  • Like 1
  • Agree 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
4 minutes ago, Dennis Crowley said:

what a load of nonsense, the world population will fit inside of NZ if we all lived as dense as they do in Manhatten, that leaves the rest of the world to grow our food. there is an estimated 15+billion acres of food growing land, the problem is distribution, consumerism, pollution and greed.

Gandhi said "the world is big enough for all our needs, but not big enough for all our greed"

Well said .... So I'll just keep the big hole burn up stoked .... pouring in the plastic and cardboard and waste oil that are the xcesses to our lifestyle . Food is not a problem . The problem is all the stuff that went in to make the  stuff that   comes out the other end. 

4 minutes ago, jamesc said:

Well said .... So I'll just keep the big hole burn up stoked .... pouring in the plastic and cardboard and waste oil that are the xcesses to our lifestyle . Food is not a problem . The problem is all the stuff that went in to make the  stuff that   comes out the other end. 

I was curious to see what other people do to keep their staff busy over the winter .

Edited by jamesc

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, Dennis Crowley said:

what a load of nonsense, the world population will fit inside of NZ if we all lived as dense as they do in Manhatten,

Maybe, but they don't do they.

 

8 hours ago, Dennis Crowley said:

the problem is distribution, consumerism, pollution and greed.

So you do agree . 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In winter I sort and scrape all my combs and boxes so they are ready for the new season. I make up any new gear including frames and boxes and do any necessary maintenance. I do any shifting hive shifting that's necessary and last but not least I take a holiday.

Holidays over the summer are only for uncommitted beekeepers.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, Dennis Crowley said:

the problem is distribution, consumerism, pollution and greed

Not to mention famine, war, and Selwyn District Council water tax

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I usually work the winter season at a Pine Forestry 3-6 month season depending, but am taking a break from it this year. Working 7 days a week then working like a mad thing over summer to get DIY and yard projects done in time, has taken its toll.

 

I was going to make a double deep hive along the lines of a Layens, but decided I should start of with just a deep long hive, using the Jumbo deeps I got from from Beequip, to get used to the larger frames and see how that goes.

 

I have been planting trees here for a number of years, mainly fruit but with the odd NZ native. 

Have a very old nectarine to cut out as it blew over and is obviously not going to regrow-core has rotted out down to the roots. I will cut that up for firewood and the punky bits will get turned into tinder.

Another fun project is to dry the Persimmons I grow. Last year, it had only a few fruit, this year its got quite a lot. I did one fruit last year with good results but didnt get to see how long they last cos I ate it. Ii have a feeling these will last for months which will give me fruit over my lean months. 

 

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, mischief said:

I was going to make a double deep hive along the lines of a Layens, but decided I should start of with just a deep long hive, using the Jumbo deeps I got from from Beequip, to get used to the larger frames and see how that goes.

Just remember that honey extractor cannot handle Jumbo frames.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've been crush and straining or just cutting it into chunks which then go either into  big jar or if its a really nice white comb into a takeaway container. I dont mind eating the odd bit of wax

  • Like 1
  • Agree 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's OK.  Just a bit of friendly advice.  

I built a Bench hive (FD frames).  (Have a look at my videos)

There are 3 videos.

I found it very annoying to operate with moving frames all the time.  I gave it away.

 

 

  

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Smaller hive mats and a follower board makes it a little more manageable. That way you should only have to move them once. Having said that, I havent been able to get this part right sometimes and have to move them all back over too.

Smaller mats has meant there is only the frames I'm working with that are exposed, having to deal with such a huge cloud would be too intimidating for me.

 

I like your roof, I was going to use a bit of metal flashing but your way also gives both an escape point for bees over the inner cover as well as ventilating the roof space.

I have ceiling insulation sitting on the inner mats, year round. I put it back on later in the day after the bees have vacated the roof space.

 

hehe, subscribed and liked.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
32 minutes ago, mischief said:

maller hive mats and a follower board makes it a little more manageable.

Nah.  The hive mats are not the problem.  I had 2 standard hive mats so just like a normal hive.

However.  You will find out that bees do not like to go horizontal.  Their natural inclination is to go vertical.  So it is an endless exercise in moving fresh frame to the area where the brood is.  If you do not do this the bees will swarm as they run out of space and will not move to outer frames.

 

This is not explained in any books that I have read.

  • Agree 1
  • Good Info 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here’s my winter project

F0606E13-A447-49B0-BC88-44C5728CDED6.jpeg

  • Like 7
  • Haha 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Looks like it will take all winter to get that face clean.

  • Agree 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
16 minutes ago, Trevor Gillbanks said:

Looks like it will take all winter to get that face clean.

 

Thats nothing! Riley really, really likes pasta! She’s into people’s food right now. None of that baby mush for her!

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On ‎27‎/‎04‎/‎2019 at 9:06 AM, jamesc said:

Part of that project is cashing in on Shane Jones' One Billion Tree program .  A handout to plant more trees. How many hectares of scrub filled gully will we need to plant to offset the emissions of our lifestyle. ?

 

Is not this whole thing flawed science?

 

We plant some trees and as they grow they absorb carbon, sure. But wood is biodegradable so the tree eventually dies, and the carbon is returned to the environment. New trees must be planted to get back to square one. No?

  • Agree 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, Trevor Gillbanks said:

I gave it away

 

Classic!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, CHCHPaul said:

 

Classic!

Yes.  They are just too hard to operate efficiently and effectively

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

So. Crap system that's hard to use and an obvious mistake. No worries, give it away to some other sucker LOL. 😄🙂😮

Edited by Alastair
  • Like 1
  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Alastair said:

We plant some trees and as they grow they absorb carbon, sure. But wood is biodegradable so the tree eventually dies, and the carbon is returned to the environment.

the carbon goes from being in the air to in the soil, which is the whole aim. you can't get rid of the carbon, you can only change where it is stored.

  • Like 1
  • Agree 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...