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Just wonder how many off you been checking your hives and finding they are broodless early this year 

normal we have brood right thru winter 

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Not all but quite a few seem to have taken a break from what I have seen. Late summer nectar shortage? Just too darn dry until now.

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Daley & himself found a couple yesterday

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Of 120 treated last week I found a couple
The one where I saw the Queen she was black as the ace of spades

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Yipp a few broodless and a couple with 6 frames of brood still which concerns me a little cos there aint much tucker round to fill those cells for the deep dark months (I guess the syrup will have to) Swings n round abouts I guess.  

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Most of ours are broodless or with Eggs just being laid. 

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2 hours ago, Chris Valentine said:

Just wonder how many off you been checking your hives and finding they are broodless early this year 

normal we have brood right thru winter 

I would say over 90% are brood less 

I would say the queen stop laying around the middle of March

they have lots off pollen and honey 

and the varroa has no where to hide 

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Hey interested to see people commenting. Been in around 120 hives over the last few days, capped brood but almost no eggs or unsealed larvae to be seen. It's like 2 weeks ago a switch was flicked, and every queen stopped laying.

 

This is real unusual at this time in Auckland, and it's not like they are black bees they are mostly golden.

 

Had thought with the warm autumn they would be brooding up too much but the opposite is the case. Surprised it looks like it's happening all over the country. Anyhow, good for winter stores, less sugar needed, excellent.

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great chance to make them nearly varroa free (does not mean they will remain free of varroa once heavily infested hives in the vicinity start dying) with just 1 treatment of oa.

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Haven't seen any broodless  yet but like Alistair I am mostly just seeing sealed brood and no eggs. Some still have good solid brood while a lot are pretty patchy and some have abandoned outlying brood to the cold which is surprising because it's not really cold, in fact the weather has been really nice for this time of year. Given the conditions there is a lot less brood than I would have expected. Hives generally have tons of stores and plenty of bees.

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In the tropics do hives never go broodless.

They would never need to winter down .

Is it lack of food that would trigger a broodless period in a warm climate .

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No, most of my hives have brood- in all stages.  Probably because they queens are fresh.  Though they are/have reduced in brood area- like @john berry outlying brood patchy or getting abandoned- and some queens are also patchy even when newish.  Sometimes the patchyness is due to following the brood pattern of predecessor and I think queens  slowing down.   

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Still got brood in hives. Thank goodness, cos it's those young autumn bees that the hives need to overwinter with.  Drones not yet on second frame in.  Hives now light on stores, so having to make sure they have enough tucker to overwinter.  Some on rocket seed production pollination.  Due to extreme temps in summer, nectar and pollen sources were lean, but pollen has improved over the last month with atmospheric due at night.  Varroa levels low.  And of course have got absolutely fabulous queens.  Not seen any rodents in sheds or yards yet, which generally happens after crops have been harvested. 

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Yup .... still got brood ..... which is 'not normal' as generally as we do our last round of the year checking weights and disease there is no brood and disease checking is tricky.

But then the bees have been working flows and the gorse is flowering again ....

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