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CANTERBURY HUB, APINZ

https://www.apinzcanterbury.org.nz/index.php

 

The Canterbury Hub encompasses southern Marlborough, Canterbury, northern Otago and Westland.  Because of the geographic size of our Hub, we have difficulties in catering for all our members.  Hence, we move around a bit for our Hub meetings and these are held mainly in Mid and North Canterbury.  We have a core element of attendees, but different speakers attract different beekeepers.  We generally hold five Hub meetings per annum, with one being a tour of a honey house.  These tours attract 40-50 people, dinner meetings with 1-2 speakers attract an average 30 people. 

We survey members approximately every 18 months and the committee take note of the feedback.  By popular demand, other than the AGM, we have done away with minuted meetings.  It appears that the priorities for our members are generally not politics, but grass roots issues:

            Beekeeping techniques

            Bee health

            Picking up on AFB

            Varroa control

Networking and socialising – beekeepers swapping ideas on how things are done, how the season is going, finding out that they are not the only ones with a particular issue

 

Our AGM is Tuesday 9 April at the Lakeside Hall, R D Leeston.  Guest speakers - Claudine McCormick and Maureen Conquer.  Workshop title - “Meet the ApiNZ National Honey Judges” and includes PowerPoint pollen microscopy, Pfund grading, Jack’s scale honey grader, the five manuka markers and what they stand for, plus honey testing.  See our website for more detail. 

 

Two years ago, for the first time in a couple of decades Canterbury field/seminar day was held in Geraldine.  Last year we went to one of the most sparsely populated areas in NZ to Moonlight hall, West Coast.  The previous day we had a tour of a local honey house, followed by dinner, with a large group of hobbyists and commercial beekeepers from the east coast staying the weekend in Blackball.  We were delighted to have just under 100 attend the Moonlight function. 

This year our annual major event is at Lincoln University, with most speakers being Hub members.  This one-day event is good value and easy access, and we are hoping for 200 attendees; quite major by South Island standards. 

ALL ARE WELCOME TO ATTEND OUR MEETINGS.

At the end of this article is the programme and speaker abstracts for our Beekeepers’ Day Out at Lincoln University, Sunday 12 May

Confirmed trade displays are:

Platinum Sponsor: NZ Beeswax Ltd

Silver Sponsors: 100 % Pure New Zealand Honey Ltd, Kaipak Ltd

Other Trades: AFB Detector Dogs (Corson), Beeline Supplies Dunedin, Ecrotek Ltd, Hill Laboratories, North Canterbury Beekeepers Club.  We have other interesting queries for trade displays and will list these as companies confirm.  Interested? - Please contact carolyn@hantzhoney.co.nz

 

The Science Good Display is by invitation and includes exhibitors from Bio Protection Research Centre Lincoln University, MPI, Plant and Food Research Ltd, Scion, Trees for Bees. 

Bookings for the Beekeepers’ Day Out close on 19 April or when capacity is reached.  Now open https://www.apinzcanterbury.org.nz/index.php

WE LOOK FORWARD TO RECEIVING YOUR RESERVATION

Due to requeening and wintering down tasks we probably can’t answer too many queries on this forum.  Any queries it is probably best to contact admin@apinzcanterbury.org.nz

 

 

APICULTURE NEW ZEALAND, CANTERBURY HUB

 BEEKEEPERS’ DAY OUT

PLATINUM SPONSOR: NZ BEESWAX LTD

 

SUNDAY 12 MAY 2019

LECTURE THEATRE PLUS FOYER, & OUTDOOR DISPLAYS, STEWART BUILDING

LINCOLN UNIVERSITY

 

PLATINUM SPONSOR: NZ BEESWAX LTD

SILVER SPONSORS: KAIPAK LTD & 100% PURE NEW ZEALAND HONEY LTD

 

MORNING SESSION: MANAGING ADVERSITIES

 

7.45 am: FOYER CHECK IN, CUPPA & COLLECT YOUR OFFICIAL NAME TAG

 

9.00 am: WELCOME ADDRESS – CHAIR OF PROCEEDINGS. Betty Murie, Wedderspoon Organic New Zealand 

 

9.10 am: OPENING ADDRESS. Karin Kos, Chief Executive, Apiculture New Zealand

 

9.25 am: HONEY BEE VENOM ALLERGY AND TREATMENT

Dr Ignatius Chua, Consultant Immunologist/Immunopathologist, Canterbury Health Laboratories, Christchurch Hospital & Maija-Stina Out, Allergy Nurse, Christchurch Hospital. Includes Q&A.

 

10.05 am: WHO’S GETTING STUNG? HAVE ACC BEE STING CLAIMS DOUBLED WITH DOUBLING NZ HIVE NUMBERS? 

Maggie James, Queen Cell & Queen Bee Producer, mjqueenb, Leeston

 

10.15 am: MORNING TEA

 

10.35 am: PLATINUM SPONSOR - NZ BEESWAX LTD

 

10.38 am: MANAGING AFTER A NATURAL DISASTER

Slide Presentation: Daniel Milne, Commercial Beekeeper, Wildrose Apiaries Ltd, Kaikoura

Contract Extraction: Mark McCusker, Commercial Beekeeper, Heathstock Apiaries Ltd, Hawarden

Floor Discussion Facilitator: Barry Hantz, Commercial Beekeeper, Hantz Honey Ltd, Leeston

 

11.10 am: HOW TO REDUCE THE INCIDENCE OF AFB WITHOUT BURNING HIVES

Dr Mark Hyslop, Ex-Scientist, Commercial Beekeeper, Hyslop Foods Ltd, North Canterbury. Includes Q&A.

 

11.40 am: MANAGEMENT AGENCY, AMERICAN FOULBROOD PEST MANAGEMENT PLAN

Marco Gonzalez, National Operations Manager. Includes Q&A.

 

MIDDAY: FOYER LUNCH. Attendees must wear official name tag.

 

 

AFTERNOON SESSION: ALTERNATIVE CONTROLS FOR PESTS & DISEASE

 

1.00 pm: THE NATIONAL APICULTURE SURVEILLANCE PROGRAMME AT MPI AND SMALL HIVE BEETLE

Dr Ben Phiri, Senior Advisor, Biosecurity Surveillance and Incursion Investigation (Animal Health), Biosecurity New Zealand, Ministry for Primary Industries. Includes Q&A.

 

1.20 pm: THE BEE PATHOGEN PROGRAMME AT MPI

Dr Richard Hall, Virologist, Bee Pathogen Programme, Diagnostic and Surveillance Services, Biosecurity New Zealand, Ministry for Primary Industries Plant Health and Environment Lab. Includes Q&A.

 

1.40 pm: USING BIOACTIVE COMPOUNDS TO PROTECT HONEY BEES

Dr Artemio Mendoza-Mendoza, Senior Researcher, Bio Protection Research Centre, Lincoln University. Includes Q&A.

 

2.00 pm: ECO-MANAGEMENT OF VARROA MITES USING A GENERALIST PREDATOR CHELIFER CANCROIDES

Dr Ronald van Toor, Senior Scientist, Crop Protection – Bio Protection Technologies, The NZ Institute for Plant & Food Research Ltd, Lincoln. Includes Q&A.

 

2.30 pm: AFTERNOON TEA

 

2.50 pm: THE GIANT WILLOW APHID & THE HARLEQUIN LADYBIRD BEETLE:

TWO INVASIONS THAT AFFECT BEEKEEPERS & WHAT TO DO TO STOP MORE OF THEM

Dr Stephen Pawson, Research Leader & Stephanie Sopow, Entomologists, Scion, Christchurch. Includes Q&A.

 

3.25 pm: BUILDING BEE FORAGE CAPACITY, TREES FOR BEES NZ

Angus McPherson, Farm Planting Adviser, Dunedin. Dr Linda Newstrom-Lloyd, Botanist, Havelock North.  Includes Q&A

 

3.45 pm: APICULTURE NZ CONFERENCE & TRADE EXHIBITION 2019, ROTORUA

John Hartnell, Member, Conference Committee

 

3.50 pm: THANK YOUS: Martin Laas, Midlands Apiaries, Ashburton

 

3.55 pm: SPONSOR & TRADE DISPLAY PRIZE DRAWS:

Carolyn McMahon, Hantz Honey Ltd, Leeston

Winners must wear official name tag

 

CLOSURE: Betty Murie

 

Editorial & photography will be provided for The New Zealand Beekeeper journal:

Editorial: Rae Butler, Bee Smart Breeding, Ashburton

Editorial: North Canterbury Beekeepers Club

Photography: Nick Thorp, Hub Member & Web Master North Canterbury Beekeepers Club

 

Photography not allowed during presentations; other than authorised people listed above. Note-taking welcome. Anyone requiring further info can contact the presenter later, who decides if information is to be disseminated.

 

COST: $65 per person. Includes luncheon, registration and am & pm cuppas, & opportunities to enter prize draws. NO DOOR SALES. NO CONCESSIONS. 

 

ONLINE ATTENDEE REGISTRATIONS ONLY—NOW OPEN: www.apinzcanterbury.org.nz

Please advise any dietary requirements or mobility issue. Theatre is tiered. Bookings close 19 April or when theatre is at capacity.  If capacity achieved prior, we will run a waiting list. Once you have completed the computerised registration process, electronic confirmation will be issued immediately to your supplied e-mail address.

 

LIMITED ACCOMMODATION, LINCOLN UNIVERSITY CAMPUS: 2-minute walk to Stewart Building, 20-minute walk to township. $85 + GST per night per person, single room. Reservation when making attendee reservation. Supplied towels, bed linen, Wi-Fi, Recreation Centre use, breakfast in dining hall. If staying pre or post Beekeepers’ Day Out, campus eateries available during business hours. Further details regarding check in and out are available once attendee has registered for both Day Out and accommodation.

 

LIMITED INDOOR & OUTDOOR TRADE DISPLAYS & SPONSORSHIP: A variety of packages available. Includes free registration for one person to attend. Enquiries to Carolyn McMahon, carolyn@hantzhoney.co.nz or 03 324 3885.

 

SCIENCE GOOD DISPLAY: Invited displays foyer mezzanine floor. Also access to theatre.

 

PAYMENT DETAILS (NON-NEGOTIABLE)

ATTENDEES & LINCOLN CAMPUS ACCOMMODATION: Via electronic transaction to Hub account no later than 23 April. Date set by Lincoln University, and will be rigidly enforced. 

TRADE DISPLAY & SPONSORSHIP RESERVATION: Immediate payment once confirmed.

 

CANTERBURY HUB BANK ACCOUNT:

Attendee surname and initial for reference.  

BNZ Paraparaumu

020733 0057338 07

TERMS & CONDITIONS: Direct credit payments as above. No solicitation of memberships, on Lincoln University site, outside of approved ApiNZ Hubs and Clubs. The two Lincoln University designated smoking areas are outside the dining room by catering office, and outside Mrs O’s restaurant. Due to strict catering commitments, there will be no refunds for cancellations after 19 April. In the event of speaker unavailability, programme may be subject to change. 

TRANSPORT TO/FROM CHRISTCHURCH AIRPORT: Located 20 minutes by vehicle to Lincoln University. This is best arranged by attendee prior to arrival at the Airport or departure. A variety of shuttle companies available; the bigger the group the cheaper the price. Shuttle fare is not part of the Hub payment or Beekeepers’ Day Out process.

 

 

 

 

… AND NOW FOR SOME OF OUR EXCITING GUEST SPEAKER ABSTRACTS

 

HONEY BEE VENOM ALLERGY AND TREATMENT

The Immunology service at Christchurch Hospital provides an outpatient-based service and regularly receives referrals of patients who have had anaphylaxis for assessment. This talk will touch on anaphylaxis diagnosis and treatment, bee sting reactions, the role of laboratory testing and our experience with bee venom desensitisation.

Biography: Dr Ignatius (Iggy) Chua trained in London, United Kingdom and was appointed Consultant Immunologist at Christchurch Hospital, Canterbury District Health Board in 2015. His clinical practice involves seeing patients with autoimmunity, immunodeficiency and allergy. His other role is as an immunopathologist in Canterbury Health Laboratories, CDHB and has oversight on laboratory tests related to autoimmunity, immunodeficiency and allergy.

 

WHO’S GETTING STUNG? HAVE ACC BEE STING CLAIMS DOUBLED WITH DOUBLING NZ HIVE NUMBERS? 

A summary of ACC statistics and Apiary Registrar hive numbers 2009-2018.

Maggie James, queen cell and queen bee producer, 12 years ago successfully completed the honey bee desensitisation programme at Christchurch Hospital.

Available on ApiNZ foyer table at lunchtime: Bee Stings and Prevention pamphlet, written by Maggie, plus a Clinical Immunology Allergy and Prevention handout.

 

MANAGING AFTER A NATURAL DISASTER

On 14 November 2016 at 2.56 a.m., a magnitude 7.8 earthquake with a depth of 15 km struck. Epicentres were Culverden and 60 km SW of Kaikoura with ruptures lasting two minutes, followed by a tsunami of 7 metres at Kaikoura. Access to Kaikoura was now via helicopters and small aircraft. Multiple RNZ vessels were deployed along with the Japanese Maritime Air Patrol.

Daniel & Alison Milne, second-generation beekeepers with a honey house half an hour down the road, suddenly found this facility was a 12-hour journey away because of thousands of slips, i.e., a 24-hour return journey! 

A slide presentation, collated by Daniel and his employee Dave Murphy, details damage and the difficulties they and the surrounding community faced on many issues that none of them had ever thought about.

Mark McCusker will briefly discuss how contract honey extraction was undertaken at Hawarden, North Canterbury, in assisting beekeepers whose operations were divided by slips. Cousins Mark and Nick McCusker are second-generation beekeepers.

Barry Hantz, third-generation beekeeper, Ellesmere will facilitate floor discussion.

 

 

HOW TO REDUCE THE INCIDENCE OF AFB WITHOUT BURNING HIVES

American foulbrood (AFB), understanding ‘the beast’ at a pre-clinical, practical beekeeping level. How have honey bees naturally combatted AFB for centuries? What seasonal management strategies can be used to stop AFB getting to clinical levels in a hive? What do ‘bad’ beekeepers do to get AFB so that they then give it to ‘good’ beekeepers? How are we going to fix the problem and who is going to do it? Answers to these questions and more ...

 

THE NATIONAL APICULTURE SURVEILLANCE PROGRAMME AT MPI AND SMALL HIVE BEETLE

The National Apiculture Surveillance Programme conducts surveillance of exotic pests and diseases of honey bees in New Zealand. This is carried out through hive inspection and collection of samples for laboratory examination. One of the major exotic pests under surveillance is the small hive beetle, which is capable of causing significant impact to honey bee colonies if it entered New Zealand.

Biography: Dr Ben Phiri is a veterinary epidemiologist and is part of the Biosecurity Surveillance Incursion Investigation Team based at Wallaceville in Upper Hutt. He oversees the national programme responsible for the surveillance of exotic pests and diseases of honey bees. Currently, he also has the task of reviewing the Animal Health Surveillance System.

 

THE BEE PATHOGEN PROGRAMME AT MPI

The New Zealand Bee Pathogen Programme is a three-year research programme funded by MPI. Sixty apiaries from around New Zealand were enrolled in the programme. Apiaries were inspected twice per year, and live bee samples collected. A total of five sampling rounds were conducted. Apiary managers were also interviewed regarding their stock management, colony losses and productivity. The study provides important information on diseases with relevance to trade and biosecurity and explores the relationships between bee pathogens and bee health—as measured by colony survival and productivity.

Biography: Dr Richard Hall has diversity in a number of scientific fields but specialises in the detection and diagnosis of viral diseases affecting humans and animals. He has a PhD in Biochemistry from the University of Otago, where his studies looked at the genetic basis of human autoimmune disease. He completed a post-doctoral fellowship with AgResearch studying the genetics of cattle and deer. Richard is a hobbyist beekeeper.

 

USING BIOACTIVE COMPOUNDS TO PROTECT HONEY BEES

Bioactive compounds have an enormous potential to control pathogen/parasite infestation (e.g., Varroa mites, Nosema spp.) of honey bees. However, despite the fact that entomopathogens have showed specificity towards Varroa mite, their implementation as biocontrol agents are limited due to their establishment of the bio-inoculant in the hives. To overcome this limitation, we are focusing in the isolation of bioactive ingredients from these fungi to evaluate their impact against Varroa without harming bees. In addition, we are evaluating alternative strategies to obtain specific and more potent miticides using chemical biology.

Biography: Dr Artemio Mendoza-Mendoza is a molecular biologist, currently focused in understanding the communication between organisms using biochemical and genetic tools. His research is currently directing his focus in the identification of natural molecules to overcome some issues that apiculture and agriculture sectors are facing. 

 

ECO-MANAGEMENT OF VARROA MITES USING A GENERALIST PREDATOR CHELIFER CANCROIDES

Describing research that aims for sustainable biocontrol of varroa on bees by manipulating hive architecture to support breeding populations of the generalist predator, Chelifer cancroides, and booklice. Correctly positioned and protected, chelifer adults actively feed on varroa without harming bees but disappear from the hive when food runs out. The novelty is the inclusion of booklice, which feed on bee detritus and sustain the chelifers when varroa densities are low. Success of the chelifer system would allow for chemical control of varroa to be replaced with an organic sustainable control option in hives worldwide.

Biography: Dr Ron van Toor is a crop protectionist at Plant and Food Research, with experience in integrated pest management systems, beekeeping and contract pollination. Apiculture research includes royal jelly production and mite control.

 

THE GIANT WILLOW APHID & THE HARLEQUIN LADYBIRD BEETLE:

TWO INVASIONS THAT AFFECT BEEKEEPERS & WHAT TO DO TO STOP MORE OF THEM

The giant willow aphid and the harlequin ladybird beetle have both recently colonised New Zealand. Both affect the apiculture industry; one is a serious pest of willows with cascading impacts in rural ecosystems and the other is a voracious predator that is both a blessing and a curse—depending on your point of view. We provide a brief overview of both species and their impacts in a New Zealand context. We then provide an overview of biocontrol efforts underway at Scion to introduce a new parasitoid wasp to control giant willow aphid populations.

 

BUILDING BEE FORAGE CAPACITY

Trees for Bees NZ is scaling up planting by integrating multi-purpose bee forage into different types of land use. In our new Sustainable Farming Fund, MPI grant (starting July 2019), we will build capacity to plant more bee forage so that it becomes a frequent and common practice throughout New Zealand. We will provide training and online tools for what to plant, how, when and where. Our work is based on ten years of research providing superior bee nutrition and implementing multi-functional planting for landowners. Beekeepers participating in our research are reporting improved apiary performance on demonstration farms. We will present practical planting designs including several demonstration farms in the Waitaki Valley, Mid Canterbury farms and lifestyle blocks, along with urban planting.  Trees for Bees NZ have recently gained charity status.    

 

 

 

 

 

 

RESPONSE TO AFB QUERY RECEIVED TODAY VIA OUR HUB WEBSITE: Yes, we talk openly about AFB in every Hub meeting and the recent Selwyn District, Mid Canterbury, AFB outbreak was identified thanks to reports from two different commercial beekeeper Hub members raising their concerns about AFB of unknown origin that they found in two different areas. 

ADDITIONAL BEEKEEPERS' DAY OUT INFO:

 

SPEAKER BIOGRAPHY ALLERGY NURSE, SOUTH ISLAND

HONEY BEE VENOM ALLERGY AND TREATMENT

The Immunology service at Christchurch Hospital provides an outpatient-based service and regularly receives referrals of patients who have had anaphylaxis for assessment. This talk will touch on anaphylaxis diagnosis and treatment, bee sting reactions, the role of laboratory testing and our experience with bee venom desensitisation.

Biography: Dr Ignatius (Iggy) Chua trained in London, United Kingdom and was appointed Consultant Immunologist at Christchurch Hospital, Canterbury District Health Board in 2015. His clinical practice involves seeing patients with autoimmunity, immunodeficiency and allergy. His other role is as an immunopathologist in Canterbury Health Laboratories, CDHB and has oversight on laboratory tests related to autoimmunity, immunodeficiency and allergy.

Biography: Maija-Stina Out, Registered Nurse, works in the Immunology Department alongside Dr Chua. Once people have been offered venom desensitisation Maija-Stina arranges for this to be done in the Christchurch Hospital Medical Day Unit. Maija-Stina will share what people can expect to happen during desensitisation. Maija-Stina Out trained in Auckland, moving to the Mainland 16 years ago. Initially working in the Medical Day Unit, developing an interest in allergy. Maija-Stina’s role as the only adult Immunology/Allergy Nurse in the South Island was created five years ago.

 

NEW TRADE DISPLAY CONFIRMATION: Beequip NZ, Motueka

 

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THURSDAY 4 APRIL: ADDITIONAL BEEKEEPERS' DAY OUT INFO:

 

 

NEW TRADE DISPLAY CONFIRMATION: Croftpak, Christchurch

 

Quote

 

HUB MEMBER SURVEY: Yearly we undertake an online survey of members.  We also take hard copy feedback from attendees at our major events.  We get some very good suggestions for speaker topics from these surveys, and also ideas on how to improve the Hub and events.  The winner of the $30 Mitre 10 gift voucher for this year's online survey was one of our hobbyist members based in Christchurch.

 

VARROA RESEARCH: Whenever possible we support any scientific research undertaken in our Hub area in the name of bettering hive health.  Last week Hub member Artemio Mendoza, Bio Protection Unit, Lincoln University put out a call for live Varroa and access to bee hives.  Artemio is investigating the use of biocontrols within the bee hive, evaluating against the Varroa mite without harming the bees.  Biocontrol is a method of controlling pests using other organisms.  Hub member Midlands Apiaries promptly came to the assistance of Artemio. 

 

 

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NOTIFICATION OF BACK UP SPEAKER IF REQUIRED FOR BEEKEEPERS' DAY OUT:

 

Honey Bunny has 20 years experience in the following:

How to survive a Natural Disaster: She has experience in the first Canterbury earthquake and can describe how to fit into 1 cm between the bed and the wall for protection.  She can also describe how she has never tried to get food off the kitchen bench since the first September earthquake, cos that's where she was when it all started to happen.  Honey Bunny has also survived a 100 year old flood from Lake Ellesmere in which she survive floating around the back section on a seed propagation tray.  From thereon in, she retreated to the highest point of the wood heap. 

Alternative Controls for Pest & Diseases: Honey Bunny, aka Darling or Beautiful, despite her age, is the most agile rodent catcher in Leeston. Does not like catching ferrets. 

There will be absolutely no problem with those in the back seats finding Honey Bunny inaudible.  She has the voice of a gannet. 

DSCF3180 (2).JPG

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Posted (edited)
34 minutes ago, Margaret Anne said:

NOTIFICATION OF BACK UP SPEAKER IF REQUIRED FOR BEEKEEPERS' DAY OUT:

 

Honey Bunny has 20 years experience in the following:

How to survive a Natural Disaster: She has experience in the first Canterbury earthquake and can describe how to fit into 1 cm between the bed and the wall for protection.  She can also describe how she has never tried to get food off the kitchen bench since the first September earthquake, cos that's where she was when it all started to happen.  Honey Bunny has also survived a 100 year old flood from Lake Ellesmere in which she survive floating around the back section on a seed propagation tray.  From thereon in, she retreated to the highest point of the wood heap. 

Alternative Controls for Pest & Diseases: Honey Bunny, aka Darling or Beautiful, despite her age, is the most agile rodent catcher in Leeston. Does not like catching ferrets. 

There will be absolutely no problem with those in the back seats finding Honey Bunny inaudible.  She has the voice of a gannet. 

DSCF3180 (2).JPG

 

On 2/04/2019 at 8:50 AM, Margaret Anne said:

CANTERBURY HUB, APINZ

https://www.apinzcanterbury.org.nz/index.php

 

The Canterbury Hub encompasses southern Marlborough, Canterbury, northern Otago and Westland.  Because of the geographic size of our Hub, we have difficulties in catering for all our members.  Hence, we move around a bit for our Hub meetings and these are held mainly in Mid and North Canterbury.  We have a core element of attendees, but different speakers attract different beekeepers.  We generally hold five Hub meetings per annum, with one being a tour of a honey house.  These tours attract 40-50 people, dinner meetings with 1-2 speakers attract an average 30 people. 

We survey members approximately every 18 months and the committee take note of the feedback.  By popular demand, other than the AGM, we have done away with minuted meetings.  It appears that the priorities for our members are generally not politics, but grass roots issues:

            Beekeeping techniques

            Bee health

            Picking up on AFB

            Varroa control

Networking and socialising – beekeepers swapping ideas on how things are done, how the season is going, finding out that they are not the only ones with a particular issue

 

Our AGM is Tuesday 9 April at the Lakeside Hall, R D Leeston.  Guest speakers - Claudine McCormick and Maureen Conquer.  Workshop title - “Meet the ApiNZ National Honey Judges” and includes PowerPoint pollen microscopy, Pfund grading, Jack’s scale honey grader, the five manuka markers and what they stand for, plus honey testing.  See our website for more detail. 

 

Two years ago, for the first time in a couple of decades Canterbury field/seminar day was held in Geraldine.  Last year we went to one of the most sparsely populated areas in NZ to Moonlight hall, West Coast.  The previous day we had a tour of a local honey house, followed by dinner, with a large group of hobbyists and commercial beekeepers from the east coast staying the weekend in Blackball.  We were delighted to have just under 100 attend the Moonlight function. 

This year our annual major event is at Lincoln University, with most speakers being Hub members.  This one-day event is good value and easy access, and we are hoping for 200 attendees; quite major by South Island standards. 

ALL ARE WELCOME TO ATTEND OUR MEETINGS.

At the end of this article is the programme and speaker abstracts for our Beekeepers’ Day Out at Lincoln University, Sunday 12 May

Confirmed trade displays are:

Platinum Sponsor: NZ Beeswax Ltd

Silver Sponsors: 100 % Pure New Zealand Honey Ltd, Kaipak Ltd

Other Trades: AFB Detector Dogs (Corson), Beeline Supplies Dunedin, Ecrotek Ltd, Hill Laboratories, North Canterbury Beekeepers Club.  We have other interesting queries for trade displays and will list these as companies confirm.  Interested? - Please contact carolyn@hantzhoney.co.nz

 

The Science Good Display is by invitation and includes exhibitors from Bio Protection Research Centre Lincoln University, MPI, Plant and Food Research Ltd, Scion, Trees for Bees. 

Bookings for the Beekeepers’ Day Out close on 19 April or when capacity is reached.  Now open https://www.apinzcanterbury.org.nz/index.php

WE LOOK FORWARD TO RECEIVING YOUR RESERVATION

Due to requeening and wintering down tasks we probably can’t answer too many queries on this forum.  Any queries it is probably best to contact admin@apinzcanterbury.org.nz

 

 

APICULTURE NEW ZEALAND, CANTERBURY HUB

 BEEKEEPERS’ DAY OUT

PLATINUM SPONSOR: NZ BEESWAX LTD

 

SUNDAY 12 MAY 2019

LECTURE THEATRE PLUS FOYER, & OUTDOOR DISPLAYS, STEWART BUILDING

LINCOLN UNIVERSITY

 

PLATINUM SPONSOR: NZ BEESWAX LTD

SILVER SPONSORS: KAIPAK LTD & 100% PURE NEW ZEALAND HONEY LTD

 

MORNING SESSION: MANAGING ADVERSITIES

 

7.45 am: FOYER CHECK IN, CUPPA & COLLECT YOUR OFFICIAL NAME TAG

 

9.00 am: WELCOME ADDRESS – CHAIR OF PROCEEDINGS. Betty Murie, Wedderspoon Organic New Zealand 

 

9.10 am: OPENING ADDRESS. Karin Kos, Chief Executive, Apiculture New Zealand

 

9.25 am: HONEY BEE VENOM ALLERGY AND TREATMENT

Dr Ignatius Chua, Consultant Immunologist/Immunopathologist, Canterbury Health Laboratories, Christchurch Hospital & Maija-Stina Out, Allergy Nurse, Christchurch Hospital. Includes Q&A.

 

10.05 am: WHO’S GETTING STUNG? HAVE ACC BEE STING CLAIMS DOUBLED WITH DOUBLING NZ HIVE NUMBERS? 

Maggie James, Queen Cell & Queen Bee Producer, mjqueenb, Leeston

 

10.15 am: MORNING TEA

 

10.35 am: PLATINUM SPONSOR - NZ BEESWAX LTD

 

10.38 am: MANAGING AFTER A NATURAL DISASTER

Slide Presentation: Daniel Milne, Commercial Beekeeper, Wildrose Apiaries Ltd, Kaikoura

Contract Extraction: Mark McCusker, Commercial Beekeeper, Heathstock Apiaries Ltd, Hawarden

Floor Discussion Facilitator: Barry Hantz, Commercial Beekeeper, Hantz Honey Ltd, Leeston

 

11.10 am: HOW TO REDUCE THE INCIDENCE OF AFB WITHOUT BURNING HIVES

Dr Mark Hyslop, Ex-Scientist, Commercial Beekeeper, Hyslop Foods Ltd, North Canterbury. Includes Q&A.

 

11.40 am: MANAGEMENT AGENCY, AMERICAN FOULBROOD PEST MANAGEMENT PLAN

Marco Gonzalez, National Operations Manager. Includes Q&A.

 

MIDDAY: FOYER LUNCH. Attendees must wear official name tag.

 

 

AFTERNOON SESSION: ALTERNATIVE CONTROLS FOR PESTS & DISEASE

 

1.00 pm: THE NATIONAL APICULTURE SURVEILLANCE PROGRAMME AT MPI AND SMALL HIVE BEETLE

Dr Ben Phiri, Senior Advisor, Biosecurity Surveillance and Incursion Investigation (Animal Health), Biosecurity New Zealand, Ministry for Primary Industries. Includes Q&A.

 

1.20 pm: THE BEE PATHOGEN PROGRAMME AT MPI

Dr Richard Hall, Virologist, Bee Pathogen Programme, Diagnostic and Surveillance Services, Biosecurity New Zealand, Ministry for Primary Industries Plant Health and Environment Lab. Includes Q&A.

 

1.40 pm: USING BIOACTIVE COMPOUNDS TO PROTECT HONEY BEES

Dr Artemio Mendoza-Mendoza, Senior Researcher, Bio Protection Research Centre, Lincoln University. Includes Q&A.

 

2.00 pm: ECO-MANAGEMENT OF VARROA MITES USING A GENERALIST PREDATOR CHELIFER CANCROIDES

Dr Ronald van Toor, Senior Scientist, Crop Protection – Bio Protection Technologies, The NZ Institute for Plant & Food Research Ltd, Lincoln. Includes Q&A.

 

2.30 pm: AFTERNOON TEA

 

2.50 pm: THE GIANT WILLOW APHID & THE HARLEQUIN LADYBIRD BEETLE:

TWO INVASIONS THAT AFFECT BEEKEEPERS & WHAT TO DO TO STOP MORE OF THEM

Dr Stephen Pawson, Research Leader & Stephanie Sopow, Entomologists, Scion, Christchurch. Includes Q&A.

 

3.25 pm: BUILDING BEE FORAGE CAPACITY, TREES FOR BEES NZ

Angus McPherson, Farm Planting Adviser, Dunedin. Dr Linda Newstrom-Lloyd, Botanist, Havelock North.  Includes Q&A

 

3.45 pm: APICULTURE NZ CONFERENCE & TRADE EXHIBITION 2019, ROTORUA

John Hartnell, Member, Conference Committee

 

3.50 pm: THANK YOUS: Martin Laas, Midlands Apiaries, Ashburton

 

3.55 pm: SPONSOR & TRADE DISPLAY PRIZE DRAWS:

Carolyn McMahon, Hantz Honey Ltd, Leeston

Winners must wear official name tag

 

CLOSURE: Betty Murie

 

Editorial & photography will be provided for The New Zealand Beekeeper journal:

Editorial: Rae Butler, Bee Smart Breeding, Ashburton

Editorial: North Canterbury Beekeepers Club

Photography: Nick Thorp, Hub Member & Web Master North Canterbury Beekeepers Club

 

Photography not allowed during presentations; other than authorised people listed above. Note-taking welcome. Anyone requiring further info can contact the presenter later, who decides if information is to be disseminated.

 

COST: $65 per person. Includes luncheon, registration and am & pm cuppas, & opportunities to enter prize draws. NO DOOR SALES. NO CONCESSIONS. 

 

ONLINE ATTENDEE REGISTRATIONS ONLY—NOW OPEN: www.apinzcanterbury.org.nz

Please advise any dietary requirements or mobility issue. Theatre is tiered. Bookings close 19 April or when theatre is at capacity.  If capacity achieved prior, we will run a waiting list. Once you have completed the computerised registration process, electronic confirmation will be issued immediately to your supplied e-mail address.

 

LIMITED ACCOMMODATION, LINCOLN UNIVERSITY CAMPUS: 2-minute walk to Stewart Building, 20-minute walk to township. $85 + GST per night per person, single room. Reservation when making attendee reservation. Supplied towels, bed linen, Wi-Fi, Recreation Centre use, breakfast in dining hall. If staying pre or post Beekeepers’ Day Out, campus eateries available during business hours. Further details regarding check in and out are available once attendee has registered for both Day Out and accommodation.

 

LIMITED INDOOR & OUTDOOR TRADE DISPLAYS & SPONSORSHIP: A variety of packages available. Includes free registration for one person to attend. Enquiries to Carolyn McMahon, carolyn@hantzhoney.co.nz or 03 324 3885.

 

SCIENCE GOOD DISPLAY: Invited displays foyer mezzanine floor. Also access to theatre.

 

PAYMENT DETAILS (NON-NEGOTIABLE)

ATTENDEES & LINCOLN CAMPUS ACCOMMODATION: Via electronic transaction to Hub account no later than 23 April. Date set by Lincoln University, and will be rigidly enforced. 

TRADE DISPLAY & SPONSORSHIP RESERVATION: Immediate payment once confirmed.

 

CANTERBURY HUB BANK ACCOUNT:

Attendee surname and initial for reference.  

BNZ Paraparaumu

020733 0057338 07

TERMS & CONDITIONS: Direct credit payments as above. No solicitation of memberships, on Lincoln University site, outside of approved ApiNZ Hubs and Clubs. The two Lincoln University designated smoking areas are outside the dining room by catering office, and outside Mrs O’s restaurant. Due to strict catering commitments, there will be no refunds for cancellations after 19 April. In the event of speaker unavailability, programme may be subject to change. 

TRANSPORT TO/FROM CHRISTCHURCH AIRPORT: Located 20 minutes by vehicle to Lincoln University. This is best arranged by attendee prior to arrival at the Airport or departure. A variety of shuttle companies available; the bigger the group the cheaper the price. Shuttle fare is not part of the Hub payment or Beekeepers’ Day Out process.

 

 

 

 

… AND NOW FOR SOME OF OUR EXCITING GUEST SPEAKER ABSTRACTS

 

HONEY BEE VENOM ALLERGY AND TREATMENT

The Immunology service at Christchurch Hospital provides an outpatient-based service and regularly receives referrals of patients who have had anaphylaxis for assessment. This talk will touch on anaphylaxis diagnosis and treatment, bee sting reactions, the role of laboratory testing and our experience with bee venom desensitisation.

Biography: Dr Ignatius (Iggy) Chua trained in London, United Kingdom and was appointed Consultant Immunologist at Christchurch Hospital, Canterbury District Health Board in 2015. His clinical practice involves seeing patients with autoimmunity, immunodeficiency and allergy. His other role is as an immunopathologist in Canterbury Health Laboratories, CDHB and has oversight on laboratory tests related to autoimmunity, immunodeficiency and allergy.

 

WHO’S GETTING STUNG? HAVE ACC BEE STING CLAIMS DOUBLED WITH DOUBLING NZ HIVE NUMBERS? 

A summary of ACC statistics and Apiary Registrar hive numbers 2009-2018.

Maggie James, queen cell and queen bee producer, 12 years ago successfully completed the honey bee desensitisation programme at Christchurch Hospital.

Available on ApiNZ foyer table at lunchtime: Bee Stings and Prevention pamphlet, written by Maggie, plus a Clinical Immunology Allergy and Prevention handout.

 

MANAGING AFTER A NATURAL DISASTER

On 14 November 2016 at 2.56 a.m., a magnitude 7.8 earthquake with a depth of 15 km struck. Epicentres were Culverden and 60 km SW of Kaikoura with ruptures lasting two minutes, followed by a tsunami of 7 metres at Kaikoura. Access to Kaikoura was now via helicopters and small aircraft. Multiple RNZ vessels were deployed along with the Japanese Maritime Air Patrol.

Daniel & Alison Milne, second-generation beekeepers with a honey house half an hour down the road, suddenly found this facility was a 12-hour journey away because of thousands of slips, i.e., a 24-hour return journey! 

A slide presentation, collated by Daniel and his employee Dave Murphy, details damage and the difficulties they and the surrounding community faced on many issues that none of them had ever thought about.

Mark McCusker will briefly discuss how contract honey extraction was undertaken at Hawarden, North Canterbury, in assisting beekeepers whose operations were divided by slips. Cousins Mark and Nick McCusker are second-generation beekeepers.

Barry Hantz, third-generation beekeeper, Ellesmere will facilitate floor discussion.

 

 

HOW TO REDUCE THE INCIDENCE OF AFB WITHOUT BURNING HIVES

American foulbrood (AFB), understanding ‘the beast’ at a pre-clinical, practical beekeeping level. How have honey bees naturally combatted AFB for centuries? What seasonal management strategies can be used to stop AFB getting to clinical levels in a hive? What do ‘bad’ beekeepers do to get AFB so that they then give it to ‘good’ beekeepers? How are we going to fix the problem and who is going to do it? Answers to these questions and more ...

 

THE NATIONAL APICULTURE SURVEILLANCE PROGRAMME AT MPI AND SMALL HIVE BEETLE

The National Apiculture Surveillance Programme conducts surveillance of exotic pests and diseases of honey bees in New Zealand. This is carried out through hive inspection and collection of samples for laboratory examination. One of the major exotic pests under surveillance is the small hive beetle, which is capable of causing significant impact to honey bee colonies if it entered New Zealand.

Biography: Dr Ben Phiri is a veterinary epidemiologist and is part of the Biosecurity Surveillance Incursion Investigation Team based at Wallaceville in Upper Hutt. He oversees the national programme responsible for the surveillance of exotic pests and diseases of honey bees. Currently, he also has the task of reviewing the Animal Health Surveillance System.

 

THE BEE PATHOGEN PROGRAMME AT MPI

The New Zealand Bee Pathogen Programme is a three-year research programme funded by MPI. Sixty apiaries from around New Zealand were enrolled in the programme. Apiaries were inspected twice per year, and live bee samples collected. A total of five sampling rounds were conducted. Apiary managers were also interviewed regarding their stock management, colony losses and productivity. The study provides important information on diseases with relevance to trade and biosecurity and explores the relationships between bee pathogens and bee health—as measured by colony survival and productivity.

Biography: Dr Richard Hall has diversity in a number of scientific fields but specialises in the detection and diagnosis of viral diseases affecting humans and animals. He has a PhD in Biochemistry from the University of Otago, where his studies looked at the genetic basis of human autoimmune disease. He completed a post-doctoral fellowship with AgResearch studying the genetics of cattle and deer. Richard is a hobbyist beekeeper.

 

USING BIOACTIVE COMPOUNDS TO PROTECT HONEY BEES

Bioactive compounds have an enormous potential to control pathogen/parasite infestation (e.g., Varroa mites, Nosema spp.) of honey bees. However, despite the fact that entomopathogens have showed specificity towards Varroa mite, their implementation as biocontrol agents are limited due to their establishment of the bio-inoculant in the hives. To overcome this limitation, we are focusing in the isolation of bioactive ingredients from these fungi to evaluate their impact against Varroa without harming bees. In addition, we are evaluating alternative strategies to obtain specific and more potent miticides using chemical biology.

Biography: Dr Artemio Mendoza-Mendoza is a molecular biologist, currently focused in understanding the communication between organisms using biochemical and genetic tools. His research is currently directing his focus in the identification of natural molecules to overcome some issues that apiculture and agriculture sectors are facing. 

 

ECO-MANAGEMENT OF VARROA MITES USING A GENERALIST PREDATOR CHELIFER CANCROIDES

Describing research that aims for sustainable biocontrol of varroa on bees by manipulating hive architecture to support breeding populations of the generalist predator, Chelifer cancroides, and booklice. Correctly positioned and protected, chelifer adults actively feed on varroa without harming bees but disappear from the hive when food runs out. The novelty is the inclusion of booklice, which feed on bee detritus and sustain the chelifers when varroa densities are low. Success of the chelifer system would allow for chemical control of varroa to be replaced with an organic sustainable control option in hives worldwide.

Biography: Dr Ron van Toor is a crop protectionist at Plant and Food Research, with experience in integrated pest management systems, beekeeping and contract pollination. Apiculture research includes royal jelly production and mite control.

 

THE GIANT WILLOW APHID & THE HARLEQUIN LADYBIRD BEETLE:

TWO INVASIONS THAT AFFECT BEEKEEPERS & WHAT TO DO TO STOP MORE OF THEM

The giant willow aphid and the harlequin ladybird beetle have both recently colonised New Zealand. Both affect the apiculture industry; one is a serious pest of willows with cascading impacts in rural ecosystems and the other is a voracious predator that is both a blessing and a curse—depending on your point of view. We provide a brief overview of both species and their impacts in a New Zealand context. We then provide an overview of biocontrol efforts underway at Scion to introduce a new parasitoid wasp to control giant willow aphid populations.

 

BUILDING BEE FORAGE CAPACITY

Trees for Bees NZ is scaling up planting by integrating multi-purpose bee forage into different types of land use. In our new Sustainable Farming Fund, MPI grant (starting July 2019), we will build capacity to plant more bee forage so that it becomes a frequent and common practice throughout New Zealand. We will provide training and online tools for what to plant, how, when and where. Our work is based on ten years of research providing superior bee nutrition and implementing multi-functional planting for landowners. Beekeepers participating in our research are reporting improved apiary performance on demonstration farms. We will present practical planting designs including several demonstration farms in the Waitaki Valley, Mid Canterbury farms and lifestyle blocks, along with urban planting.  Trees for Bees NZ have recently gained charity status.    

 

 

 

 

 

 

RESPONSE TO AFB QUERY RECEIVED TODAY VIA OUR HUB WEBSITE: Yes, we talk openly about AFB in every Hub meeting and the recent Selwyn District, Mid Canterbury, AFB outbreak was identified thanks to reports from two different commercial beekeeper Hub members raising their concerns about AFB of unknown origin that they found in two different areas. 

ADDITIONAL BEEKEEPERS' DAY OUT INFO:

 

SPEAKER BIOGRAPHY ALLERGY NURSE, SOUTH ISLAND

HONEY BEE VENOM ALLERGY AND TREATMENT

The Immunology service at Christchurch Hospital provides an outpatient-based service and regularly receives referrals of patients who have had anaphylaxis for assessment. This talk will touch on anaphylaxis diagnosis and treatment, bee sting reactions, the role of laboratory testing and our experience with bee venom desensitisation.

Biography: Dr Ignatius (Iggy) Chua trained in London, United Kingdom and was appointed Consultant Immunologist at Christchurch Hospital, Canterbury District Health Board in 2015. His clinical practice involves seeing patients with autoimmunity, immunodeficiency and allergy. His other role is as an immunopathologist in Canterbury Health Laboratories, CDHB and has oversight on laboratory tests related to autoimmunity, immunodeficiency and allergy.

Biography: Maija-Stina Out, Registered Nurse, works in the Immunology Department alongside Dr Chua. Once people have been offered venom desensitisation Maija-Stina arranges for this to be done in the Christchurch Hospital Medical Day Unit. Maija-Stina will share what people can expect to happen during desensitisation. Maija-Stina Out trained in Auckland, moving to the Mainland 16 years ago. Initially working in the Medical Day Unit, developing an interest in allergy. Maija-Stina’s role as the only adult Immunology/Allergy Nurse in the South Island was created five years ago.

 

NEW TRADE DISPLAY CONFIRMATION: Beequip NZ, Motueka

 

I would suggest you cut to the Chase and find a South Island spokes person for the OA Staple
Its not my place to name someone but be assured there are Beeks down there who have used tens of thousands of them and I find it amusing that you have a field day where you dont have a speaker on the subject.

 

There are two routes
Onwards and upwards or around in circles,
Whats it going to be 

 

Edited by Philbee
  • Agree 2

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Thank you for your comment Phil.  We are very open minded on speakers.  The reality is that most of the speakers for our Beekeepers' Day are Hub members.  Those who aren't either reside or work in the Hub area.  There are only so many speakers we can fit into one Day, and we already have a speakers list for offers to speak for next year, and yes we have a queue for speakers for Hub monthly meetings.  So yes, it is onwards and forwards for us, as we have a queue of speakers.  Though for this year we do have trade display places still available at a nominal rate, so I guess its onwards and upwards for open minded people who want a trade display. 

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3 minutes ago, Margaret Anne said:

 

Thank you for your comment Phil.  We are very open minded on speakers.  The reality is that most of the speakers for our Beekeepers' Day are Hub members.  Those who aren't either reside or work in the Hub area.  There are only so many speakers we can fit into one Day, and we already have a speakers list for offers to speak for next year, and yes we have a queue for speakers for Hub monthly meetings.  So yes, it is onwards and forwards for us, as we have a queue of speakers.  Though for this year we do have trade display places still available at a nominal rate, so I guess its onwards and upwards for open minded people who want a trade display. 

There will never be a trade stand for Staples ever.
What is required is an introduction to the system so that when the Staple comes to the Beek as it will, they are ready.
I speak here and there about the Staple and most of what I speak about are the dangers and draw backs of using the Staple System.
 

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Thank you for this information.  We have a good sized Hub meeting on Tuesday.  Canterury and Westland are incredibly lucky in speakers, cos we want to hear what is happening.  Our invited Hub speakers are booked up until the end of this year.  We are already accepting speakers for our major event in 2020, but that is a Hub membership and committee decision as to the topics selected.  All very democratic, the committee go with what the membership wants.

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WORKSHOP, SOCIAL EVENT & HUB AGM HELD TUESDAY 9 APRIL:

We had a great attendance at the “Meet the ApiNZ Honey Judges” workshop, with a good spread from all sectors of the industry.  Many thanks to Claudine McCormick and Maureen Conquer for their interesting hour-long talk.  This was followed by honey tasting, platters and socialising prior to the Hub AGM.  A delicious buffet meal followed.  Extra thanks to Maureen for taking the time to fly from Auckland especially for the Judges’ presentation, and Airborne Honey for honey wheel charts and pollen microscopy slides, and to Hantz Honey for complimentary hall hire.  It’s always a gamble when we go to a site a bit off the beaten track, and that is part and parcel of our large geographic area.  But each time we get our core element and depending on speakers and location of venue we refreshingly get a variety of faces; often new.

Photo - L: Maureen Conquer.  R: Claudine McCormick

DSCF3181 - Copy (2).JPG

Meet the honey Judges and AGM.jpg

 

15 minutes ago, Margaret Anne said:

Photo - L: Maureen Conquer.  R: Claudine McCormick

 

Meet the honey Judges and AGM.jpg

DSCF3181 - Copy (2).JPG

BEEKEEPERS' DAY OUT UPDATE

Currently we have 100-seat occupancy.  200 seats are the target, for our truly exciting world class programme.  The Hub Committee are incredibly pleased to note bookings from Southland through to Motueka.   

DUE TO STRICT CATERING REQUIREMENTS BOOKINGS MUST CLOSE 19 APRIL OR AT CAPACITY

DON’T DELAY – BOOK TODAY

http://www.apinzcanterbury.org.nz/index.php

 

CONFIRMED TRADE DISPLAYS:

Platinum Sponsor: NZ Beeswax Ltd, Orari

Silver Sponsors: Kaipak Ltd, Ashburton.  100% Pure New Zealand Honey Ltd, Temuka

Other Trades: AFB Detector Dogs (Corsons’), Whitecliffs. Beeline Supplies Ltd, Dunedin. Beequip NZ, Motueka. Croftpak Ltd, Christchurch. Ecrotek Ltd, Christchurch. Hill Laboratories, Hamilton. North Canterbury Beekeepers Club, Kaiapoi.  

 

Trade display enquiries welcome – three foyer spaces still available, plus outdoor spaces

Promptly hit your keyboard contacting Carolyn McMahon carolyn@hantzhoney.co.nz  or 03 324 3885

 

ITEM FOR AUCTION (PROCEEDS TO HUB):

One ticket for Queen Cell Production PowerPoint Tutorial for Producing Large Numbers of Quality Queen Cells. Springston, Canterbury 9 June.  Donated by Maggie James.  See attached pdf

 

 

Maggie Advert Final Draft Apr 2019 J.pdf

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HONEY HOUSE TOUR & WESTLAND FIELD DAY 2018

 

40 Hub members visited Glassons Honey, Blackball then adjourned for socialising and meal at the Blackball Hilton, where most from this side of the "hill" stayed the night before the Westland Field Day.  Just under 100 attended the Field Day, held at Moonlight Hall. 

 

Photos show Gary Glasson with his Ezyloader drum lifter, capable of 400 kg lifts.  Also glass and metal artwork at Glassons.  No AFB on this specimen! 

 

The West Coast Hobbyist Club trade display the following day at Moonlight with soaps, candles and api-haberdashery.  Drapery items ranged from $2.50 upwards.  Suzie Roper's quilts available for sale suziegirl123@hotmail.com  with bee & floral themed material and complex top stitching were stunning. 

Gary Glasson With His Ezyloader Drum Lifter - Copy (4).JPG

Whoops - will have to give the artwork, and the West Coast Hobbyist stand a miss.  Can't get my beekeeping skills around resizing

wchbc stand - Copy (4).jpg

a (4).JPG

 

 

MIDLANDS APIARIES & KAIPAK TOURS, ASHBURTON

50 beekeepers and market sector Hub members rocked up for this event.  After visiting Midlands Apiaries the group went next door to plastic packaging manufacturer Kaipak.  The precision robots were remarkable, nothing like we had ever seen before.  The group then retreated to an Ashburton restaurant for the evening.  Photo shows some Hub members waiting their turn to commence the tours. 

midlands (5).PNG

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BEEKEEPERS' DAY OUT UPDATE:

 

TRADE DISPLAY CONFIRMED

AsureQuality Ltd, Chantel Rich, South Island Apiculture Officer, Lincoln

 

We will continue to take reservations for attendees until the end of next week.  This is a world class speaker programme, with great trade displays.  The Canterbury Hub is recognised as having a good vibe at events.  There is plenty of time allocated for Q&A, networking and socialising.  ALL WELCOME, BUT REGISTRATION REQUIRED

 

http://www.apinzcanterbury.org.nz/index.php

 

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