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cBank

NZBF Disease identification

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Periodically I get the below. The seems to happen in little patches and seems to clear up as I reduce varroa numbers. The bees chew them down and remove them. This hive had 15 varroa per sugar shake, now down to 1-2 after 5 weeks.

CED29085-D4CD-4941-AFFC-5D020DB6C5D3.jpeg

Argh, the time out on editingmposss is way too short. 

‘Bald brood’ seems to be what I’d be calling it, with wax moth being a common cause according to the google machine. Is this guess even close? They are usually quite close together...

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Varroa sensitive hygiene your Q might be worth a fortune !

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Have you seen any wax moth evidence in your hives ? 

 

Apparently , hygienic bees will detect varroa in larvae and open them up and remove them . I used to think that was what was happening , but the varroa still come out winning and realistically I had no proof that’s what was happening . You’d expect the bees to open up the majority of cells if this was the case , which also can’t be that good for the prosperity of the hive , removing hard earned brood . 

 

It is the season of the wax moth larvae . More likely is that a larvae has burrowed along beneath the bee larvae , damaged them and the bees are removing them 

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1 minute ago, M4tt said:

More likely is that a larvae has burrowed along beneath the bee larvae , damaged them and the bees are removing them 

Can't see any sign of that..

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Where giant wax moth has been underneath the cells, the caps look like white webbing, rather than no cap.

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I have found wax moth in a frame in a neighbouring, formerly very varroa ridden, hive. It has rebounded very fast, but has a way to go yet. I might have more of a poke about next time I see it and have a look underneath or on the other side more carefully.

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When they are in a line it is often wax moth but this looks more like improperly capped brood caused by what I believe is a genetic variation . Used to see a lot of it years ago and you would get the odd hive where almost hundred percent of the brood was not fully capped. Never seem to make any difference to the hive but it was not something that was selected for. Since varoa I have often wondered whether it would make any difference and if I came across one of those hives I would definitely do some monitoring on it. Whatever the cause it is basically harmless and just one of life's interesting little mysteries.

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Can I clarify @john berry, when they were improperly capped, they hatched or died? At least some of mine are dead, and I saw one or 2 that were chewed down. I’d certainly not considered that some might be alive. They are always nice and white.

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They were always alive. If some of your is a dead then you have another problem.. All of the ones in the photo look absolutely normal to me..

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I had a poke about. Those bees are alive. I’ve learned something, thank you.

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If I see this I run my hive tool through it and destroy it and often, not always, there is a wax moth grub underneath it that I then squash.

Sometimes you can have several bees grouped together trying to exit their cells, and they can't seem to get out.  If you pull them out you

will notice they have no wings.  It is my theory that wax moth removes their wings as it squirms up and down the side

of the cell.

 

Others options, varroa hygience, or a Queen genetic issue.

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I had a good look at both sides and destroyed the cells and I didn’t find anything underneath. The bees that came out were healthy looking.

When it has been wax moth, had the cells been uncapped rather than never capped?

I think mine haven’t been capped, but looking at that photo again I am less sure of that (particularly the lower left ones).

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54 minutes ago, cBank said:

I had a good look at both sides and destroyed the cells and I didn’t find anything underneath. The bees that came out were healthy looking.

When it has been wax moth, had the cells been uncapped rather than never capped?

I think mine haven’t been capped, but looking at that photo again I am less sure of that (particularly the lower left ones).

Biology leads me to believe they have to be capped to pupate.

The bees must have uncapped them 

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19 hours ago, CraBee said:

If I see this I run my hive tool through it and destroy it and often, not always, there is a wax moth grub underneath it that I then squash.

Sometimes you can have several bees grouped together trying to exit their cells, and they can't seem to get out.  If you pull them out you

will notice they have no wings.  It is my theory that wax moth removes their wings as it squirms up and down the side

of the cell.

 

Others options, varroa hygience, or a Queen genetic issue.

Are the wings complexity missing or just screwed up as in dwv ??

I was checking some hives over the weekend, uncapping random brood etc.

I found a few cells that were capped with a fully formed bee upside down inside. Anyone got an idea on what causes this ?? Bees looked fine but had died as they couldn’t get out. Not every cell, just the odd one. 

 

 

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5 hours ago, nikki watts said:

 

I found a few cells that were capped with a fully formed bee upside down inside. Anyone got an idea on what causes this ?? Bees looked fine but had died as they couldn’t get out. Not every cell, just the odd one. 

 

 

You see this from time to time often in queen cells, a worker has gone in perhaps to clean the hatched cell and the lids been closed and re sealed.. what a way to go! 

 

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