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Hello Beekeeping friends,

after a long time without bees, I am back and give it another go.

As some of you know I needed to stop beekeeping as I developed a severe allergy against bee stings and after several anaphylactic shocks, (one of them almost killed me)  I decided to stop with beekeeping. Then I started a new business and as things sometimes go a different way I went badly sick for a long time and I am still recovering but it looks all is going the right way now.

As Beekeeping is a kind of addictive I can't stay away and decided to start again a bit with beekeeping. I needed to change my safety protocol "working with bees".   Tapes and gumboots, adrenaline are my friends and tools now to make me a kind of bee proof.

Looking forward to seeing how it works?

There is nothing more rewarding as watching bees.

Manfred

 

 

 

 

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Welcome back @Manfred

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sorry to have to say this, but nothing is bee proof.

your playing russian roulette. 

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1 hour ago, Manfred said:

Hello Beekeeping friends,

after a long time without bees, I am back and give it another go.

As some of you know I needed to stop beekeeping as I developed a severe allergy against bee stings and after several anaphylactic shocks, (one of them almost killed me)  I decided to stop with beekeeping. Then I started a new business and as things sometimes go a different way I went badly sick for a long time and I am still recovering but it looks all is going the right way now.

As Beekeeping is a kind of addictive I can't stay away and decided to start again a bit with beekeeping. I needed to change my safety protocol "working with bees".   Tapes and gumboots, adrenaline are my friends and tools now to make me a kind of bee proof.

Looking forward to seeing how it works?

There is nothing more rewarding as watching bees.

Manfred

 

 

 

 

 

It may be worth taking an antihistamine or two before working the bees, that should help if you do get stung....

 

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39 minutes ago, tristan said:

sorry to have to say this, but nothing is bee proof.

your playing russian roulette. 

I agree. You'll still get stung 

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Welcome back Manfred. I have missed you.  I hope everything goes smoothly

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Yes I know nothing is bee proof, I can deal with some stings strange is I have no problem as long they sting my fingers or hands. It gets nasty when they sting my arms so I protect my arms as good as possible. Will do a desensitisation will see how this goes.

  

10 minutes ago, Trevor Gillbanks said:

Welcome back Manfred. I have missed you.  I hope everything goes smoothly

Hi Trevor,

thank you very much yes all good.Looking forward to seeing how it works. Enjoying sitting in front of the beehive and reading what's going on :>)

 

 

1 hour ago, CraBee said:

 

It may be worth taking an antihistamine or two before working the bees, that should help if you do get stung....

 

Yes thank you CraBee, that's what I do it works so far. I am more conscious when I work the bees, weather and time wise. My biggest mistake was once I was working them late in the evening and a whole bunch of bees where crawling up on my bee suit and were sitting at angle hight as I took out the overall I rolled them down on the leg and received more than 35 sings. blood pressure was down to 35 to 60. 

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Most of the stings I get are when I'm taking gear off or because of put gear on over top of a bee that is already on me. Have you tried desensitisation .

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3 hours ago, CraBee said:

 

It may be worth taking an antihistamine or two before working the bees, that should help if you do get stung....

 

 

Sorry,  but an antihistamine or two will do nothing for a person who has an anaphylactic sensitivity. 

 

But an epipen in your pocket, your bee box and your car would be a good investment... regardless of price.

 

there are some great success stories with desensitisation too. 

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8 minutes ago, Josh said:

 

Sorry,  but an antihistamine or two will do nothing for a person who has an anaphylactic sensitivity. 

 

But an epipen in your pocket, your bee box and your car would be a good investment... regardless of price.

 

there are some great success stories with desensitisation too. 

 

He did mention he had an Epipen.

This was an extra thing to do.

I have a land owner who got stung and had to be rushed into the med centre with breathing problems.

The med centre sent him home with anti-histamines and he was told to take them if he was stung again.  That advice is a bit different to your view.

I have a family member who if he is coming out drops an antihistamine as he has swollen up a bit in the past (sometimes) with stings, so suitable in his case.

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Absolutely @CraBee. My advice would be for @Manfred to discuss desensitisation with a specialist before restarting. Have ample epipens stashed in a few places, and never open the hives alone. 

 

Anaphylaxis to the point of nearly dying is a fairly precarious place to be for a hobby. But then again people like to proximity fly in a wingsuit too. 

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21 hours ago, john berry said:

 Have you tried desensitisation .

My brother in law had an anaphylactic reaction several years ago and is now happily back hobby beekeeping after desensitisation.  It was a long process, he was cautious working the bees again for a while and carried an epipen, but hasn't needed it and the desensitisation seems to have worked really well for him.

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2 hours ago, Beehaving said:

 

My brother in law had an anaphylactic reaction several years ago and is now happily back hobby beekeeping after desensitisation.  It was a long process, he was cautious working the bees again for a while and carried an epipen, but hasn't needed it and the desensitisation seems to have worked really well for him.

Hi Beehaving, thanks for that did he do it here in NZ?

17 hours ago, Josh said:

 

Absolutely @CraBee. My advice would be for @Manfred to discuss desensitisation with a specialist before restarting. Have ample epipens stashed in a few places, and never open the hives alone. 

 

Anaphylaxis to the point of nearly dying is a fairly precarious place to be for a hobby. But then again people like to proximity fly in a wingsuit too. 

must be that way hehe

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a few sources of stings for me over the last few days:

  1. beesuit fairly wet with sweat after five hours work in warm humid conditions, wet fabric stretched across skin with a few agitated bees = you'll have to wear thick layers under the suit
  2. picking up a box after i was done and dusted, squashed a bee under my thumb because i didn't look to check it was free of stragglers = stay alert and eyes open
  3. lazy with beesuit tucked into gumboots. Some poor bee ended up rolling down to my foot and got crushed = keep an eye on all entry points.

if you know you're at risk then at the very least try and identify the possible sting causes then do what you need to do to minimise those risks.

 

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32 minutes ago, tommy dave said:

a few sources of stings for me over the last few days:

  1. beesuit fairly wet with sweat after five hours work in warm humid conditions, wet fabric stretched across skin with a few agitated bees = you'll have to wear thick layers under the suit
  2. picking up a box after i was done and dusted, squashed a bee under my thumb because i didn't look to check it was free of stragglers = stay alert and eyes open
  3. lazy with beesuit tucked into gumboots. Some poor bee ended up rolling down to my foot and got crushed = keep an eye on all entry points.

if you know you're at risk then at the very least try and identify the possible sting causes then do what you need to do to minimise those risks.

 

yes, that's what I do and I take more time to work them.

 

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On 1/04/2019 at 5:09 PM, Manfred said:

Hi Beehaving, thanks for that did he do it here in NZ?

No he is in Australia.  I am sure the process would be much the same in NZ, I imagine your doctor would refer you to an Immunology Clinic.

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On 1/04/2019 at 8:38 PM, tommy dave said:

a few sources of stings for me over the last few days:

  1. beesuit fairly wet with sweat after five hours work in warm humid conditions, wet fabric stretched across skin with a few agitated bees = you'll have to wear thick layers under the suit
  2. picking up a box after i was done and dusted, squashed a bee under my thumb because i didn't look to check it was free of stragglers = stay alert and eyes open
  3. lazy with beesuit tucked into gumboots. Some poor bee ended up rolling down to my foot and got crushed = keep an eye on all entry points.

if you know you're at risk then at the very least try and identify the possible sting causes then do what you need to do to minimise those risks.

 

 

4. Put you hood/veil on straight away. I’m pretty sure that when I get a bee inside my hood that it crash landed in there when I was lighting the smoker. Then I flicked it over and zipped it up...

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1 hour ago, CHCHPaul said:

 

4. Put you hood/veil on straight away. I’m pretty sure that when I get a bee inside my hood that it crash landed in there when I was lighting the smoker. Then I flicked it over and zipped it up...

I always check my hood now .

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Welcome back @Manfred. I have one of your fantastic left handed Jakels and a Rauchboy -Still my pride and joy.  We drove up from Puhoi to collect them in about 2014. I’m sorry to hear you had a reaction a sting it must have been soon after my purchases and very frightening. 

 

Knowing where you live, if you do get stung, be prepared to ‘make a scene’, don’t ‘tough it out’, inject, consider getting straight in the car as passenger and driven towards nearest emergency help via a route with cell phone coverage, its either that or the Westpac helicopter ....

—always make sure your wife is home and within 2 minutes of you when you work the hive, phones in pockets, car ready to go on the driveway, drill agreed

 

This what reduced my own sting events - mind you I’m a beginner...

—look before you touch hiveware, each side as you put your hand on

-take the maximum dose of antihistamine daily. 20mg. 

-always have a lit smoker wafting smoke gently near hive entrance

-don’t take a frame out if a line of guard bees are eyeballing you, gently apply smoke until all eyes are turned away from the beekeeper. 

-take your time, with leather gloves on you will be less sensitive to causing the bees physical damage when you take frames out.

 

-If they ping me its always my fault and I have caused it.....usually -without gear on, no smoke, at dusk when I’m tidying up with the apiary too much speed and confidence after opening hives earlier

-I cause alarm with a naked hands sudden appearance under an empty hive floor -I haven’t looked before I touched

- no gear on, no smoke. Duh.

-replacing metal lids and I didn’t look at the handle grip or hive lid before I slipped my fingers into it. Doh.

-basically over confidence and laziness, when I have Not put my gear back on to finish off clean up around the home apiary later in the day

 

I’m getting better at listening to their patient warnings and backing off when bees crash into my veil, and seeing guardbees on alert giving me the evils from the top of frames ( Randy Olivers first year beekeeping notes scientific beekeeping, images of guard bees eyeballing the beekeeper from the frame -classic...but obviously not the ‘get stings regularly’ method that works for him)

 

Hoping all goes well Manfred, I have seen how much you love beekeeping.

Yes Epipen! First things first

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On 9/04/2019 at 12:36 PM, GoED said:

Welcome back @Manfred. I have one of your fantastic left handed Jakels and a Rauchboy -Still my pride and joy.  We drove up from Puhoi to collect them in about 2014. I’m sorry to hear you had a reaction a sting it must have been soon after my purchases and very frightening. 

 

Knowing where you live, if you do get stung, be prepared to ‘make a scene’, don’t ‘tough it out’, inject, consider getting straight in the car as passenger and driven towards nearest emergency help via a route with cell phone coverage, its either that or the Westpac helicopter ....

—always make sure your wife is home and within 2 minutes of you when you work the hive, phones in pockets, car ready to go on the driveway, drill agreed

 

This what reduced my own sting events - mind you I’m a beginner...

—look before you touch hiveware, each side as you put your hand on

-take the maximum dose of antihistamine daily. 20mg. 

-always have a lit smoker wafting smoke gently near hive entrance

-don’t take a frame out if a line of guard bees are eyeballing you, gently apply smoke until all eyes are turned away from the beekeeper. 

-take your time, with leather gloves on you will be less sensitive to causing the bees physical damage when you take frames out.

 

-If they ping me its always my fault and I have caused it.....usually -without gear on, no smoke, at dusk when I’m tidying up with the apiary too much speed and confidence after opening hives earlier

-I cause alarm with a naked hands sudden appearance under an empty hive floor -I haven’t looked before I touched

- no gear on, no smoke. Duh.

-replacing metal lids and I didn’t look at the handle grip or hive lid before I slipped my fingers into it. Doh.

-basically over confidence and laziness, when I have Not put my gear back on to finish off clean up around the home apiary later in the day

 

I’m getting better at listening to their patient warnings and backing off when bees crash into my veil, and seeing guardbees on alert giving me the evils from the top of frames ( Randy Olivers first year beekeeping notes scientific beekeeping, images of guard bees eyeballing the beekeeper from the frame -classic...but obviously not the ‘get stings regularly’ method that works for him)

 

Hoping all goes well Manfred, I have seen how much you love beekeeping.

Yes Epipen! First things first

Hi great to hear that you like the tools. :>)  Yes certainly you change your way how you work the bees and desensitisation is the next thing I do. I use adrenalin which is cheaper as api pen. My wife is an expert in checking the suit and taking care of me. 

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