Jump to content
Rookie

Honey storage

Recommended Posts

Hi there,

 

When it comes to storing honey for potentially long periods of time in 300kg drums.

 

Is room temperature generally ok? Or if you have the option, would it be better stored in temperature controlled rooms?

 

thanks

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Depends what you are storing. If you are trying to ripen Manuka, then you need to keep it warm, but not overheat or the HMF gets fiddled with. If you just can't sell it and are storing it ..... anything goes.   We have honey sitting in the shed here that has gone through the winter with a temperature range from  -10c in July  to  a January high  of +38c. Still tastes OK.

 

As an aside, I sat on the phone today trying to sell honey. One has to go through the motions I suppose.  What a joke.  Most replies were along the lines of .... "we are pretty good  thanks ...... we bought   ten tonnes of clover  last week.... "

We packed a tonne last week for our end of the road  shop ...... OMG. 

Surely this is an opportunity ....... awash with honey and the big players don't seem to be trying to swell their bottom lines.  

I guess they are'nt hungry ... yet.

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The amount of HMF increases with time and temperature so if you want to keep it a LONG time, then cool will be better.

There is a maximum limit for HMF in the UK, but it's not easy to measure it.

Or is there?

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
38 minutes ago, AdamD said:

The amount of HMF increases with time and temperature so if you want to keep it a LONG time, then cool will be better.

There is a maximum limit for HMF in the UK, but it's not easy to measure it.

Or is there?

Yep. Just send a new sample for testing. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Is there a way someone could do it themselves or does "sending it away" mean that they use loads of clever (expensive) stuff to do the job?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I’m sure the test process will be in the notes on the lab report but I’m not clever enough to understand what most of the words even mean. 

There is also a predictive  test that can give you an idea of what the mgo, dha and umf will do over several time frames with different storage heats. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, AdamD said:

Is there a way someone could do it themselves or does "sending it away" mean that they use loads of clever (expensive) stuff to do the job?

In NZ, there only a couple of labs with the right registration to test honey, and they are geared up to do large numbers of samples accurately and quickly. Highly mechanised gear worth millions - no juggling test tubes and beakers etc.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, AdamD said:

Is there a way someone could do it themselves or does "sending it away" mean that they use loads of clever (expensive) stuff to do the job?

 

Send it to an accredited lab for a 3-in-1 test and you'll get the HMF concentration as part of the suite. Usually about $40 per sample. There isn't a simple or reliable way you can measure it at home, unfortunately.

 

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
On 21/03/2019 at 11:17 PM, Jacob said:

 

Send it to an accredited lab for a 3-in-1 test and you'll get the HMF concentration as part of the suite. Usually about $40 per sample. There isn't a simple or reliable way you can measure it at home, unfortunately.

 

Now there's a challenge for someone to develop a home test kit!

 

Unfortunately if I tried to send honey to NZ for testing I would probably be flogged!

Edited by AdamD

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
34 minutes ago, AdamD said:

Unfortunately if I tried to send honey to NZ for testing I would probably be flogged!

We had a talk from Analytica Laboratories at Bee Club last week.

Kate told us that Analytica test honey from overseas all the time.  There are a lot of regulations around the handling and permits for those samples.

 

It is possible to test them in NZ Labs.

  • Agree 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
26 minutes ago, Trevor Gillbanks said:

Kate told us that Analytica test honey from overseas all the time. 

Why ?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
49 minutes ago, yesbut said:

Why ?

Knowing the Aussies, they would then say 'tested by Analytica NZ' without saying whether it passed or not.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, yesbut said:

Why ?

 

A lot of our international testing is for things that are issues internationally and not just in NZ. Specifically things like C4 Sugars and HMF that are export requirements for many countries. As we run these tests in high volumes, our tests are generally quicker and cheaper than overseas labs so the cost of freight and getting a sample halfway around the world is more cost and time efficient. We do get plenty of requests to test foreign honeys for 3in1 but unless the nectar source is a Leptospermum, the test results are always a non-detect. 

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 2
  • Agree 1
  • Good Info 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Kate R said:

 

A lot of our international testing is for things that are issues internationally and not just in NZ. Specifically things like C4 Sugars and HMF that are export requirements for many countries. As we run these tests in high volumes, our tests are generally quicker and cheaper than overseas labs so the cost of freight and getting a sample halfway around the world is more cost and time efficient. We do get plenty of requests to test foreign honeys for 3in1 but unless the nectar source is a Leptospermum, the test results are always a non-detect. 

Thanks @Kate R Explained so much better than I could.

 

Great talk last Thursday.  I learnt a lot.

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...