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tommy dave

March 2019 Apiary Diary

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5 minutes ago, frazzledfozzle said:

Honey co-op

 

Got that also, probably good thing to try, and good to see someone take the bull by the horns and just do it, rather than just trumpet blowing.

 

However from where i'm looking there are 2 issues that apply regardless what structure is selling honey. Which are 1. that high prices have reduced local NZ honey consumption to around 1/2 what it was pre big price hikes. And 2. that overseas markets for non manuka honey have died since large amounts of honey were funnelled out of these markets and into the blended manuka business.

 

Falling prices will help resolve the local consumption issue, in a free market, prices will drop until there is a balance between how much can be produced and how much people will buy. Overseas, markets and contacts will gradually be re established, but working against some stiff competition from some high quality overseas honeys.

 

The NZ market will just work itself out, as it is flooded with honey from all and sundry, at whatever they are able to sell it for. Overseas needs greater organisation and skill.

 

A few years ago avocado growers were all doing their own thing with marketing overseas and struggling financially. Then they got together and formed an organised marketing organisation, and prices for some growers pretty much doubled overnight. They went from struggle street to comfortable.

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There has never been a recorded afb case on great Barrier. I know from old timer beekeepers it has been here before reporting was instigated. 

Ive always been worried how effective my inspections are as I’ve only ever seen it once in person and I’m the only one inspecting brood

 

Mpi can over November last year and sampled bees from 3 of our apiaries. Overall we were very pleased with low or no virus’s detected.

however.... 

One tested positive for afb spores in the bees, they said they do two types of test and one showed as no spores and the other had low level, not high enough to report it as positive but Richard was kind enough to call me personally and give me a heads up. There have been no clinical signs and that apiary is our second most productive and has the most productive hive we have in it. 

 

Perhaps for those of us in areas not covered by dog teams could use bee sampling as another tool. 

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Posted (edited)

Got an email from an American beekeeper i chat with sometimes. Saying he had been to England and while there had purchased a very small manuka plant which he has brought back to the US and hoping to propagate it.

 

We did send manuka to England a few years back.

Edited by Alastair

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1 hour ago, nikki watts said:

There has never been a recorded afb case on great Barrier. I know from old timer beekeepers it has been here before reporting was instigated. 

Ive always been worried how effective my inspections are as I’ve only ever seen it once in person and I’m the only one inspecting brood

 

Mpi can over November last year and sampled bees from 3 of our apiaries. Overall we were very pleased with low or no virus’s detected.

however.... 

One tested positive for afb spores in the bees, they said they do two types of test and one showed as no spores and the other had low level, not high enough to report it as positive but Richard was kind enough to call me personally and give me a heads up. There have been no clinical signs and that apiary is our second most productive and has the most productive hive we have in it. 

 

Perhaps for those of us in areas not covered by dog teams could use bee sampling as another tool. 

Perhaps the real risk is the migrating type commercial beek who brings hives over on the ferry.

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43 minutes ago, Sailabee said:

Perhaps the real risk is the migrating type commercial beek who brings hives over on the ferry.

That was my first thoughts too. These bees have been in the same place for 5 years. 

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2 hours ago, Alastair said:

Got an email from an American beekeeper i chat with sometimes. Saying he had been to England and while there had purchased a very small manuka plant which he has brought back to the US and hoping to propagate it.

 

We did send manuka to England a few years back.

There are native NZ plants all over the world now and there have been for years 

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6 hours ago, jamesc said:

Sounds a bit like spray damage in Bee yards ...... why would you persevere to live there 😘

Entirely agree. I changed jobs. I don’t really used the car now and bike to work. Today I went into town for work. 4.5 hours parking, $45.

 

Hope to pass that bill up the chain though.

2 hours ago, M4tt said:

There are native NZ plants all over the world now and there have been for years 

 

I saw some silver ferns for sale there. Probably 1.5m tall, £800.

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2 hours ago, cBank said:

Entirely agree. I changed jobs. I don’t really used the car now and bike to work. Today I went into town for work. 4.5 hours parking, $45.

 

Hope to pass that bill up the chain though.

 

I saw some silver ferns for sale there. Probably 1.5m tall, £800.

Probably took 20yrs to reach that tall over there 

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Gee i seem to be posting a lot lately...

another alert this arvo, this time to all mid canty beekeepers.

 

Afb alert from the waimak to the rakaia rivers. Now its 188 hives destroyed, 57% of just one beekeepers hives.

 

😪

 

I honestly want to know HOW?

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Posted (edited)

Blimmen heck is this beekeeper new to the industry ?

and like you I would be wondering how can that even happen !

Edited by frazzledfozzle
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Both you and I, Rashika.

 

After another hot hot day in the sun lifting more honey boxes ...... the cell phone was working overtime with alerts pinging in , and I was getting more and more peed off .

 

So at three o'clock Main Man and I knocked off for the day, mainly because we had run out of sticky boxes to under super hives with, and did a detour home via the bottle store , after which we sat by the side of the road and had a cold one, and a  tele conference with another Main Man about the Central Canterbury fiasco. 188 hives burnt right smack bang in the middle of us ..... and we were undersupering with those wets today.

 

AFB is nothing new. Another reputable Canterbury Beekeeper has apparently burnt 300 this year. We have burnt slightly less ..... so far.

 

Which got me thinking .....

 

Obviously the system in place is not working.

The problem people are both undercover and high profile.

The high profile have the ability to sort their problem, except that they rely on hired labour who may not share the passion of the owner of the business. 

The undercover guys , the ones who run several hundred on the side in what may well have been quite a lucrative little business over the last few years, are a curved ball.  They have the main income and the bees have been a top up. Now with declining honey prices the bees may become a liability and the enthusiasm wanes. The work ethic slackens and things have the potential to go pearshaped. 

 

Experience  tells me that while rob out notification are a  real gut wrencher ..... all is not lost. In the past we have had a rob out in yards of 80 to 120 and thought all was lost. Funnily enough, all was not lost and we still have bees.

 

The AFB Agency is there to monitor the incidence and spread of the bacteria. I always thought it was there  to eradicate, but there ya go .... I learnt something last week ! 

It's up to us at the coal face.

 

The dogs are an exceptional tool for quickly  screening hives that may be a problem. As I sat on the roadside talking on the phone we floated the idea of a screening program in our neck of the woods.  An open offer to all beekeepers in our patch to come out of the woodwork and  embrace the concept of the dogs sniffing around their bees.  What would be good is if the Management Agency would coordinate  the idea and release confidential information about Beekeepers and contact details. 

 

Just another thought after a hot day, parked up on the roadside with a cold one.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Posted (edited)

anyone else encountered a message regarding a north-canterbury beekeeping outfit that had afb found in about 60% of their hives over the weekend? 14 sites with robbed out hives.

There have been some indications as to who they are, but i'm not set up for private messaging and probably inappropriate to post here.

Dirt beekeepers should be banned from beekeeping.

 

edit, should have scrolled up. Hororata?

Edited by tommy dave
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Wow i thought that Canterbury thing was getting sorted after that huge AFB find a year or so ago.

 

To have that many hives infested out of that size total most likely means they were not doing any AFB inspecting or control at all, and spreading infected gear between hives for quite some time.

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You cannot ban people from keeping bees unless there is a law change.Ok you can stop him exporting but the honey then goes to the local market.The Agencies aim is to get rid of AFB altogether from N.Z. hives.Under the present scheme this will never work.

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Posted (edited)
3 minutes ago, Bighands said:

You cannot ban people from keeping bees unless there is a law change.

they have put restricted places notices in place though, which is a good start.

and this could soon stop people keeping bees commercially:

$500 plus the direct costs of:inspecting all hives in all apiaries owned by the beekeeper twice each yeardestroying AFB hivesauditing beekeeper’s compliance with 122(1)(c) direction

Edited by tommy dave
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1 hour ago, Rashika said:

I honestly want to know HOW?

 

I wish someone would publish the stories. Many industries do as ‘post-mortems’. It’s very helpful, though generally they are written about the handling of unusual circumstances, rather than straight up neglect or incompetence which seem to be hinted at above.

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15 minutes ago, cBank said:

 

I wish someone would publish the stories. Many industries do as ‘post-mortems’. It’s very helpful, though generally they are written about the handling of unusual circumstances, rather than straight up neglect or incompetence which seem to be hinted at above.

there is write ups in the beekeeper mag. 

but getting full "post mortems" is very difficult. a lot of those sort of beeks will talk crap and even lie their arses off. you will never get a straight answer out of them.

a bit of a shame as its a good opportunity to learn.

 

24 minutes ago, Bighands said:

You cannot ban people from keeping bees

are you sure on that? they seam to be able to ban people from a lot of things. just need a good judge.

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40 minutes ago, tommy dave said:

anyone else encountered a message regarding a north-canterbury beekeeping outfit that had afb found in about 60% of their hives over the weekend? 14 sites with robbed out hives.

There have been some indications as to who they are, but i'm not set up for private messaging and probably inappropriate to post here.

Dirt beekeepers should be banned from beekeeping.

 

edit, should have scrolled up. Hororata?

I think we are at ground zero Tommy ... I know that Rashika is too.... Apparantly all is under control now .

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48 minutes ago, tommy dave said:

anyone else encountered a message regarding a north-canterbury beekeeping outfit that had afb found in about 60% of their hives over the weekend? 14 sites with robbed out hives.

There have been some indications as to who they are, but i'm not set up for private messaging and probably inappropriate to post here.

Dirt beekeepers should be banned from beekeeping.

 

edit, should have scrolled up. Hororata?

North Canterbury?? 

Think this maybe the same outbreak just south of the Waimak? 

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3 minutes ago, Stoney said:

North Canterbury?? 

Think this maybe the same outbreak just south of the Waimak? 

yep, i got info via an email from someone who thought i might be interested. Mid-canterbury it turns out. So, yep, same one.

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What is this restricted movement thing? The infected beekeeper cannot move hives, or, nobody in the area can move hives?

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Just now, Alastair said:

What is this restricted movement thing? The infected beekeeper cannot move hives, or, nobody in the area can move hives?

i think it's just the apiary, as in nothing can come or go from it - similar to farms for mycoplasma bovis. I'd have to do a bunch of reading to confirm though - sorry not as much use as i would like.

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I’m blaming the incessant stream

of txt and phone calls... I think i washed my queen. I realised before I shook, but I couldn’t find her again😩. Few drones still around still and/or I might get lucky. 

 

Good news, mite count was only one. Another hive 5 so put in my next lot of strips. 

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1 hour ago, Alastair said:

What is this restricted movement thing? The infected beekeeper cannot move hives, or, nobody in the area can move hives?

The Restricted Place Notice only applies to the apiaries owned by the beekeeper concerned. They cannot move hives from any of their apiaries without a permit from the Management Agency.

 

Other beekeepers with hives in the high risk area are free to move their hives, but as described in this afternoons alert, Beekeepers in the High Risk Area are advised to take the following actions to identify any of their own hives that may have become infected as a result of this outbreak and prevent AFB spreading to their other hives:

1.       Identify all hives that either are currently situated on apiaries in the High Risk Area or have been situated in the High Risk Area at any time during the 2018/19 season.

2.       Ensure that all hives identified receive monthly inspections for the balance of the autumn period and next spring for minimum of 6 months.

3.       Beekeepers should note that hives in the High Risk Area will have a higher than average risk of becoming infected with AFB for the next two years and beekeepers should manage their risk by:

a.       Implementing quarantine measures

b.       Ensuring that they complete full frame inspections of every frame of brood at regular intervals during the spring build up and at least once during the autumn

c.       Minimising the amount of brood shifted between hives

d.       Minimising the making of splits, tops and nucs

e.       Minimising the exchange of wet or dry supers between hives located in the High Risk Area and hives from outside the High Risk Area,

f.        Avoiding the use of feed honey or bee collected pollen, and

g.       Minimising the movement of hives and

h.       Keeping good traceability records.

Map of the High Risk Area below

AFB High Risk Area.jpg

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15 minutes ago, AFB PMP Management Agency said:

AFB High Risk Area.jpg

map supports the hororata theory eh

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