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This person has asked for help and advice. After seeing some of the answers on this thread if I was a beginner in trouble  I might hesitate to do the same thing.  Everyone makes mistakes and everyone

Hopefully not but the chances of it arriving in the next 10 years would have to be well over 50% and the chances of  getting rid of it once it is here is zero unless it is picked up almost immediately

Dead bees out front and dead brood also .

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2 hours ago, yesbut said:

Be reasonable please. Mike's in  Northland, the hive Auckland, could easily be a two week drive what with traffic jams, repainting road marking, ditch cleaning & prangs.

Good Call Yesbutt ..... a lot of the comment is knee jerk reaction ..... a guttural frrrk ..... but on reflection, when mikey JB  pokes his head above the parapit he sort of knows he will be a target .... but also , he's brave enough to do it and hopes for a positive outcome. 

So, Mikey JB ..... let us know what you find ! 

 

 

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1 hour ago, john berry said:

This person has asked for help and advice. After seeing some of the answers on this thread if I was a beginner in trouble  I might hesitate to do the same thing.  Everyone makes mistakes and everyone has to learn and those  lower on the learning curve will do a lot less harm if they feel confident about asking for advice without fear of condemnation.

while thats true, hopefully there is others out there that see this and learn from it. the replies are not just there for the OP but also for the lurkers and wanabees in the future.

 

learn beekeeping first before buying a whole lot of hives.

eg don't be like that guy i mentioned not long ago about buying 20 afb infected hives. thats a lot of money that went up in smoke.

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On 1/03/2019 at 5:44 PM, Sailabee said:

As a hobbist often helping newbeeks, if last inspection was Christmas, I would be suggesting PPBK was the problem - its March for goodness sakes and I would never use a gap filler instead of a bit of wood to close down an entrance.

Took me a while to figure out what ppbk means. But I get it now. 

In my opinion......I'd guess the hive was delivered queen less or became queen less soon thereafter. So it would be strong at that point and got progressively weaker. Wax moth moves in and in this warm humid summer weather in a brood nest with loads of pollen in due to being broodless by now....then at last a family of mice has moved in and dragged all this detritus out. That's about what I see. Personally I dont think bees should be left in the hands of totally unskilled people.  This gives us beekeepers a bad look. There could also be AFB involved here. Probably been robbed out .....may be the reason for loads of bees around last week. Ppbk. Is my diagnosis also. Not Nosema

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maybe deadout for whatever reason and a fair while ago. wax moth droppings built up on frames and baseboards, water has got inside and washed all the wax moth droppings out in the form of that goop... and if it was a recent dead hive some bees would have come out with it

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On 2/03/2019 at 11:07 AM, Kiwi Bee said:

Is it possible that this hive is a "Rent a hive" kind? Hence only one hive so far from the beekeeper. Hmmm??? I do not see other reason to have only one hive so far.

Twas testing out what flows are like in downtown Auckland

 

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On 2/03/2019 at 11:57 AM, tristan said:

 

unless its on a mesh base, sealing up a hive like that can make the hive cook itself. i've seen hives that got so hot the wax has melted.

 

the hive has been dead for quite some time. could even been caused by shifting it down there.

other than that your not going to know anything until its inspected.

It was positioned in the shade for anything other than early morning sun

 

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On 2/03/2019 at 12:00 PM, tristan said:

also a semi with 40 hives but doesn't seam know the basic's of beekeeping.

unfortunately there is tons of people like this around and they can cause some big damage to everyone else.

I could say to you in reply: A guy with 7300 posts who doesn't know the basics of grammar. But i am not that churlish.

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On 2/03/2019 at 1:22 PM, jamesc said:

Good Call Yesbutt ..... a lot of the comment is knee jerk reaction ..... a guttural frrrk ..... but on reflection, when mikey JB  pokes his head above the parapit he sort of knows he will be a target .... but also , he's brave enough to do it and hopes for a positive outcome. 

So, Mikey JB ..... let us know what you find ! 

 

 

Thanks yes, here they come. And as you say those with temper tantrums dont faze me

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23 hours ago, Mike Fox said:

Took me a while to figure out what ppbk means. But I get it now. 

In my opinion......I'd guess the hive was delivered queen less or became queen less soon thereafter. So it would be strong at that point and got progressively weaker. Wax moth moves in and in this warm humid summer weather in a brood nest with loads of pollen in due to being broodless by now....then at last a family of mice has moved in and dragged all this detritus out. That's about what I see. Personally I dont think bees should be left in the hands of totally unskilled people.  This gives us beekeepers a bad look. There could also be AFB involved here. Probably been robbed out .....may be the reason for loads of bees around last week. Ppbk. Is my diagnosis also. Not Nosema

I think you will find overstocking of bees in the Manuka gold rush and threatening the viability of existing beekeepers that have being in it for years and is now leading to dramatic falls in the likes of Comvitas revenue due to their avarice is the worst look for the Full Commercial Operations. SIr Ed would be rolling in his grave if he knew what had happened to this once gentleman industry

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Oh crikey mikey JB .... that looks sad. The bees never really got going, queen never got mated  and died out and the wax moth moved in.  Pack her up in the freezer and try again next year.

OK ... lesson 101 in the art of the photo to the forum.   Photo shoot yr photo in the cell phone, crop it save it, then upload ..... but only bombard us with nice photos !

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21 hours ago, lexy said:

maybe deadout for whatever reason and a fair while ago. wax moth droppings built up on frames and baseboards, water has got inside and washed all the wax moth droppings out in the form of that goop... and if it was a recent dead hive some bees would have come out with it

It was well sheltered from wind and rain and also it has a well sprung hive lid. It was alive up to not long ago but im not sure if was queenless or whatever while still alive up to just over a week ago. Mice getting in way be a theory but if you look close at the hive face in the first photo you will see that there is the same coffee colour mess there too and as far as i know mice cant fly but you people seem to be able to correct me on what i once assumed

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That’s a weak hive that’s stored pollen because there was no brood to feed it to and no young bees to draw wax .

How old are those frames because there have been a few cycles of brood through poorly drawn frames 

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3 minutes ago, jamesc said:

Oh crikey mikey JB .... that looks sad. The bees never really got going, queen never got mated  and died out and the wax moth moved in.  Pack her up in the freezer and try again next year.

OK ... lesson 101 in the art of the photo to the forum.   Photo shoot yr photo in the cell phone, crop it save it, then upload ..... but only bombard us with nice photos !

Yep sure, il remember those photo tips thanks, i avoid facebook for exactly what you mention.

It had overwintered and was producing good brood before i moved it to Auckland at Xmas so seems somethings happened post leaving Northland.

Can i clean this out properly in the freezer or if there is any nosema will that render the frames unusable?

Thanks

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1 minute ago, M4tt said:

That’s a weak hive that’s stored pollen because there was no brood to feed it to and no young bees to draw wax .

How old are those frames because there have been a few cycles of brood through poorly drawn frames 

Good pointers thanks. One and a half season old frames but i cant be absolutely sure on that.

I still dont understand what the brown goo is out the front and up the front of the hive

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You can’t diagnose AFB without brood present to poke a matchstick at to rule that out straight away ,and the wax moths have destroyed evidence that may have been there.

I don’t think it would be overly wise to take that gear back home again.

Funnily enough , the wax moth infestation doesn’t look that healthy either 

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The hive went Queenless probably during the move.  Bee numbers dwindled away over the past two months and then wax moth took a hold and the remaining bees vacated the premises in protest.  The brown goo I'm not sure about.  

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Any frames that I have that get half drawn like that , I scrape down , rewax and get the bees to start again .

Depending in how heavily waxed they were to start with , or not , at some point they’ve mined the wax off the plastic below the drawn comb . Once they are like that , the bees just won’t continue filling with comb on plastic , and part drawn frames are not helpful to a hive .

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55 minutes ago, MikeyJB said:

It was well sheltered from wind and rain and also it has a well sprung hive lid.

yeh i just mentioned it because i had a box in the garage that got wax moth all through it. the garage flooded soaking it, eventually goop similar to that came out the bottom

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only seeing a few frames out of 20 (assuming its double 3/4 brood) its not easy to make a call on whats happened.

old emergency queen cell there. bit of scale but nothing thats screams afb.

the scrapped down and reused frames which are horribly drawn out and should have never been used in the brood box, let alone continued to be used for a number of seasons.

that alone causes a few issues.

possibly its queen fail but that may just be an outside frame. really need to see the rest.

 

37 minutes ago, CraBee said:

The brown goo I'm not sure about. 

the brown goo is hive debris thats gotten wet. fairly normal. the brown on the face could be a few things but not enough there to worry about.

 

51 minutes ago, MikeyJB said:

One and a half season old frames but i cant be absolutely sure on that.

i would say at least 2-3 years for a couple of them.

 

57 minutes ago, MikeyJB said:

t had overwintered and was producing good brood

i think you need to go find a good beekeeper and see what good brood looks like.

there is no way those frames had good brood on them.

 

 

 

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Pic 2 shows a comb with a "queen space", ie, a circular empty area the bees keep clear for the queen to lay in. Had the hive died in a queenright state we would expect to see dead brood in this comb. My feeling is the queen had some kind of accident and the bees raised a new one, and the hive had a virgin for a time, had there not been one this queen space would have been dotted with more pollen like the rest of the comb. But she didn't start laying and the hive eventually died due to lack of new bees.

 

Bees in a broodless hive can live for quite some time, and we can tell by the advanced state of wax moth infestation that the hive has also been dead for quite some time. In my view the hive was already queenless before it was moved to Auckland, there is not really any other way the timing of the whole scenario can work.

 

In the comb with the queen space, we can see the remains of at least one dead larva. However if the hive had died of AFB, we would be seeing the remains of larvae killed by AFB. It has to be that way, because in the final stages of death by AFB there are so many dead larvae and so few bees, that they don't clean them and there are always larval remains unless the hive died in a broodless time of year. None visible here so without seeing the rest of the hive, in my view the hive is AFB free.

 

Although others will disagree, if this hive were mine I would be using the combs again, just clean the wax moth webbing, put them in a hive and let the bees sort it out. Long as they go into a strong hive it's amazing how the bees can have them looking as good as new. Me, i wouldn't scrape them down most of the existing comb is re usable. The bees will fix these combs faster if they are not scraped down, than if they are scraped down.

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