Jump to content
Boot

Australian Manuka (Faux Manuka, Jelly Bush, Kallara) threat!

Recommended Posts

Argument over a honey levy or personal views on the MPI Manuka Definition aside. This press release and move by the AMHA is the biggest single threat the the NZ honey industry. Like it or not Manuka Honey opens doors, drives reputation, builds awareness and sets NZ apiculture apart on the world stage. 

Protecting the 'Manuka' name as a New Zealand trademark is the biggest most important battle ahead. This is where a united front and an voice of a nation is needed. There is one chance and one moment in history to get their right. Now! If this battle is lost, there will be multiple countries producing Manuka Honey - The value, the quality, the distinction will be lost.

Read more:

https://www.linkedin.com/feed/update/urn:li:activity:6499844216200495104

https://www.linkedin.com/feed/update/urn:li:activity:6502689984460390400

Australian Manuka adopts revolutionary Mark of Authenticity to meet international standards


Blog-Post-Image_MoA-1024x320.jpg
  • MGO is internationally recognised as a key measure of Manuka antibacterial activity
  • UMF® ratings no longer meet labelling requirements
  • New Mark of Authenticity proves consumer confidence for Australian Manuka

The Australian Manuka Honey Association (AMHA), in partnership with leading scientists, has established a set of standards for authentic Australian Manuka honey.

AMHA Mark of Authenticity

Honey that carries the AMHA’s Mark of Authenticity must be pure, natural Manuka honey, produced entirely in Australia, and be tested by an independent, approved laboratory to ensure it meets minimum standards of naturally occurring methylglyoxal (MGO), dihydroxyacetone (DHA), and leptosperin.

“These compounds are all naturally occurring in authentic Manuka. The level of MGO determines the potency of the honey, while the amount of DHA shows that this potency came naturally from the bees collecting Manuka nectar, and the leptosperin is further proof of authentic Manuka”, explained honey chemistry expert, Dr Peter Brooks.

MGO is the centrepiece of the AMHA’s Australian Manuka honey rating system. This is in line with changing international standards and labelling requirements. Large international retailers, such as Holland and Barrett (one of the UK’s largest health food retailers with a growing presence in Europe and Asia), are moving away from the UMF® system, to MGO ratings and are soon to phase out UMF® labelling.

AMHA Chairman, Mr Paul Callander, stated “We are delighted and not surprised with this decision as MGO has increasingly become the preferred rating system across the world. It makes sense that large retailers are moving to the MGO system and, in doing so, they are making direct comparison between different products much easier for their customers.”

To download a copy of the full AMHA Press Release regarding the Mark of Authenticity, please click here.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

From an NZ standard perspective.....back to the future?

  • Agree 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Ali said:

From an NZ standard perspective.....back to the future?

You have lost me I am afraid 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Adam Boot said:

You have lost me I am afraid 

 

It used to be NZ sold Manuka honey on MGO /UMF and that was basically the test that the honey was Manuka. 

Now there’s a whole raft of tests to be done to determine if it’s manuka and even then a good percentage of real Manuka honey is failing the tests.

 

So Aussie are making it easy for their faux Manuka to be packed with numbers on it and any type of honey in the jar but as long as it’s got the required MGO that’s on the label then it’s good to go.

I’m sure they will do very very well with a standard like that. 

  • Agree 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Adam, you’re the marketing guy.

 

i would have thought a NZ press release sent to the right places outlining the reasons why NZ moved away from these three markers for Manuka i.e. ease of adulteration, availability of adulterants, past examples of adulteration and the fact DHA is in sunscreen, should be enough to counter this press release.

 

i don’t see anything that alarming here, NZ is better to forge ahead and take the high ground.  I’m sure as a marketer you would be well equipped to have the above discussion with your customers?

 

cheers

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, Pinnacle said:

Adam, you’re the marketing guy.

 

i would have thought a NZ press release sent to the right places outlining the reasons why NZ moved away from these three markers for Manuka i.e. ease of adulteration, availability of adulterants, past examples of adulteration and the fact DHA is in sunscreen, should be enough to counter this press release.

 

i don’t see anything that alarming here, NZ is better to forge ahead and take the high ground.  I’m sure as a marketer you would be well equipped to have the above discussion with your customers?

 

cheers

Good call. No pressure there then. It is a battle that can be won, however Australia are throwing millions of $ at this. Some unscrupulous retailers will buy the bull simply to drive down Manuka prices and move consumers to MGO honey from any country as opposed to Manuka for NZ.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Adam Boot said:

Good call. No pressure there then. It is a battle that can be won, however Australia are throwing millions of $ at this. Some unscrupulous retailers will buy the bull simply to drive down Manuka prices and move consumers to MGO honey from any country as opposed to Manuka for NZ.

Adam I think you and I are on the same side here.

 

i wouldn’t say no cause for alarm exactly - but this should be bread and butter to marketers.  Even if (and its a big IF) NZ manages to get Manuka trademarked in important markets, the aussies won’t lie down and go away.  They’ll either do their own research and promote their product as “better” than Manuka or they’ll switch the game to another honey.  

 

Ive already voted yes to the honey levy and I’m comfortable with a proportion of that levy being spent on marketing. I expect whoever is spending it though to work their balls off for it like I do getting the honey produced in the first place.  Keeping Manuka in first position globally is going to take some serious work!  Defending it against all comers is such a basic part of the equation to me it barely rates a mention. More important is improving and growing the story, keeping ahead of the chasers.  And of course developing new unique NZ honey market positions so we’re not so reliant and frightened of Manuka 

Edited by Pinnacle

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@Adam Boot, how is it that nz was supposedly on the brink of losing its Manuka markets because of no standard but the Australians are making massive inroads exporting their no standard faux Manuka to those exact same markets ? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
28 minutes ago, frazzledfozzle said:

@Adam Boot, how is it that nz was supposedly on the brink of losing its Manuka markets because of no standard but the Australians are making massive inroads exporting their no standard faux Manuka to those exact same markets ? 

PRICE

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

continued:Boot we do not have a free trade agreement with China yet as far as I know but the Aussies do.I am sure that helps.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Adam Boot said:

PRICE

That is a really interesting comment .

There are a couple of things , at least, that spring to mind from that, for me.

The bulk of consumers don’t have endless funds to throw at everything they want/need. So price is a driver .

So is quality though , and consumers idea of quality is driven by both ‘numbers’ and perception of quality . 

 

As a marketer then , you have a doubly difficult job . 

Honey is honey , and so long as it’s from NZ or Australia , is unlikely to be sugar water . So that’s good for the consumer . 

Add to that the numbers . Scientific proof that what’s on the label is in the jar. So far so good . 

 

So, if consumer X is happy with the numbers and the price coming out of Oz ( and they probably are now they have a taste for it ) how on earth do you convince them that NZ branded and tested honey is worth their while parting with more dollars ? 

Even if you do convince them , how do you then prevent them going back to the product  where they are perceived to get more Kg for less $$. 

 

From my point of view I respect that your job is very challenging 

 

Edited by M4tt

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Some Australian honeys have demonstratably higher levels of MGO than  New Zealand manuka.They may in fact be better than manuka, only time will tell and if there honey does proved to be better, good luck to them.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, john berry said:

Some Australian honeys have demonstratably higher levels of MGO than  New Zealand manuka.They may in fact be better than manuka, ontoy time will tell and if ther e honey does proved to be better, good luck to them.

I would buy high umf aussie honey .

I have had a lot of success using manuka honey and garlic as a wound dressing .

I regret eating so much of the comb manuka i was given .

I am wondering if comb manuka if more effective because it is totally unprocessed.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Adam Boot said:

PRICE

 

So if Australia has no problem exporting their faux Manuka that has no standard and isn’t on the brink of having doors shut because of it why was NZ on the verge of being shut out ?

  • Agree 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, frazzledfozzle said:

 

So if Australia has no problem exporting their faux Manuka that has no standard and isn’t on the brink of having doors shut because of it why was NZ on the verge of being shut out ?

 

One other possible reason - there’s also no evidence that Australia are rorting the system selling thousands of tonnes more ‘manuka’ than they have hives, or ‘manuka’’ with little/no activity. 

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
19 hours ago, M4tt said:

That is a really interesting comment .

There are a couple of things , at least, that spring to mind from that, for me.

The bulk of consumers don’t have endless funds to throw at everything they want/need. So price is a driver .

So is quality though , and consumers idea of quality is driven by both ‘numbers’ and perception of quality . 

 

As a marketer then , you have a doubly difficult job . 

Honey is honey , and so long as it’s from NZ or Australia , is unlikely to be sugar water . So that’s good for the consumer . 

Add to that the numbers . Scientific proof that what’s on the label is in the jar. So far so good . 

 

So, if consumer X is happy with the numbers and the price coming out of Oz ( and they probably are now they have a taste for it ) how on earth do you convince them that NZ branded and tested honey is worth their while parting with more dollars ? 

Even if you do convince them , how do you then prevent them going back to the product  where they are perceived to get more Kg for less $$. 

 

From my point of view I respect that your job is very challenging 

 

Nothing beats the truth Matt and nothing is easier than telling the truth

Tell the truth and no one can touch you.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 minutes ago, Philbee said:

nothing is easier than telling the truth

It's not particularly easy on here sometimes !

  • Haha 1
  • Disagree 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 hours ago, JohnF said:

 

, or ‘manuka’’ with little/no activity. 

 

But the honey that’s failing the mpi Manuka standard has plenty of activity so as it stands not all activity has nothing to do with whether the honey is Manuka or not.

Australia is also selling their faux Manuka including peroxide activity which really pushes up the numbers which NZ is  unable to do. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would still like to know what the initial Manuka standard was going to be before the last minute change .

no one has been able to answer this question so far.

I would like specifics as to which markers were tweaked and from what to what 

@Adam Boot ?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
44 minutes ago, frazzledfozzle said:

 

But the honey that’s failing the mpi Manuka standard has plenty of activity so as it stands not all activity has nothing to do with whether the honey is Manuka or not.

Australia is also selling their faux Manuka including peroxide activity which really pushes up the numbers which NZ is  unable to do. 

 

I meant, its perhaps why Australia is getting away with a weaker standard - to date no evidence of rorting the system.

Plus, as mentioned, about half a dozen (to date) species of theirs have higher levels of the 'not so unique' manuka factors (DHA, MGO, leptosperin) than our manuka.

If you want to create a standard based on these older markers . . you're just handing the industry over to Australia with a big red bow on it IMO

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 24/02/2019 at 4:56 PM, frazzledfozzle said:

@Adam Boot, how is it that nz was supposedly on the brink of losing its Manuka markets because of no standard but the Australians are making massive inroads exporting their no standard faux Manuka to those exact same markets ? 

perhaps because a large proportion of Australia's "manuka expertise" seems to come from Comvita who gained that expertise in the NZ market so they have a pretty good idea how the market really works?

 

Y'know all that stuff about how our guvment keeps cancelling visas on NZ'ers who have been here since childhood and gone off the rails;  perhaps you could get your PM to call our PM and ask them to cancel Comvita's visa.  It'd put a big dent in your oz-competition and I don't expect too many over here would complain.... just a thought

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Unlikely your government would cancel any kind of visa that Comvita might have as they are true blue kiwis.

 

its only the people that have a kiwi passport but have never actually lived in this country that Oz like to deport.

Oz grown crims sent back to NZ for us to deal with.

 

Of course Ozzie’s come to this country and get every single benefit that kiwis get, no discrimination and if you take into account the size and population of each country, per capita there are far more Aussies living in NZ than vice versa.

 

I have no problem with Aussies living and working in NZ and able to claim any and all benefits eligible to kiwis.

I do have a problem with how Australia treats our citizens.

 

Both sides of our family came to NZ from Oz back in the day.

 

edited:

thinking about it there’s not much about Comvita that’s kiwi any more so they wouldn’t be deported anyway :) 

Edited by frazzledfozzle
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, JohnF said:

Plus, as mentioned, about half a dozen (to date) species of theirs have higher levels of the 'not so unique' manuka factors (DHA, MGO, leptosperin) than our manuka.

 

Some older data from the Sunshine Coast Uni.  Interesting to note their levels for L. scoparium at 3,000 ppm when work published by UMFHA show 5,000 ppm here in NZ.

L. polygalifolium is widespread and a great coloniser of significant areas of sand mined country along the Australian coast.

 

 110567949_AustralianLeptospermumsDHA-SunshineCoastRIRDCdata.jpg.964a2e47c428c228bdbec82db93f396d.jpg

 

It seems they took a reasonable number of samples and think genetics is a big driver of variability. 

 

1944695114_TreeDataforMGOL.liversidgei.thumb.jpg.2794256390559635b4068d91a2afbfe2.jpg

 

 

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Presumably if they chase the market with one of the leptospermuns we don’t have, we should be able to import it and play them at their own game.

 

afterall, we’ve imported most of our horticultural crops.

 

and plenty of countries have imported our Manuka.

 

😁

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...