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CHCHPaul

Question Sloped site and sheep

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How do you set up your sloped site to best manage about 10 or so hives. In my case i can drive the truck right to the bottom of the site. 

 

Also, do sheep rub on hives and do i need to protect them?

 

cheers, Paul

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Best plan is to not set up a sloping site, they are far harder on your body to work, than a flat site. But if you have to, then yes, you want to get the truck as close to the hives as possible. Setting up an apiary can be a compromise between how you think the bees want their hives sited, and your own needs such as comfortable working conditions, and vehicle access.

 

Sheep generally do not bother hives. Sometimes if there is a really beligerant old ram in the paddock they can push hives around, or if the hives are too close to a fence sheep can move them as they squeeze through the gap so have hives well over a sheep width away from fences. But for the most part sheep don't bother bees so just put the hives there and see how it goes.

Edited by Alastair
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I have seen a sheep that was sleeping between the hives get a fright from we turned up and knock over six hives in panic but generally they leave hives alone and keep the grass short. I used to do a fair bit of AFB inspection and my pet hate was hives placed too close together to work from the side. Hives are designed to work from the side and are best kept in groups of two, in fact there is a fair bit of evidence to suggest they do better in twos than in singles.

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11 hours ago, CHCHPaul said:

How do you set up your sloped site to best manage about 10 or so hives. In my case i can drive the truck right to the bottom of the site. 

 

Also, do sheep rub on hives and do i need to protect them?

 

cheers, Paul

 

sloping sites are a nitemare, even with small number off hives.

very difficult to put any thing down as it will fall down or roll down.

then moving gear up and down gets real hot real quick. it gets exhausting lugging supers up/down even a small slope. it literally be a killer.

 

we have a small site at families place thats a measly 5m up a slope from the drive. its an absolute mission to work those hives.

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Get a good spade and dig yourself flat spots, go totally overboard, it takes a while but they stay that way and it’s worth it in the long run.

With cattle if you can’t run a tape or your sick of it getting wrecked you can use steel reinforcing hammered into the ground and stapled to your bases, this will generally hold up to a fair bit of rubbing.

Not ideal if your moving hives though.

 

Also blocks of 4, one hive facing each way are harder to knock over and is a good deterrent to cattle.

But it can also leave you with your butt in the doorway if your not careful

Edited by Daley

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2 hours ago, CHCHPaul said:

How do you set up your sloped site to best manage about 10 or so hives. In my case i can drive the truck right to the bottom of the site. 

 

Also, do sheep rub e  hives and do i need to prot ect them?

 

cheers, Paul

I started off with hives on slopes and out of the way of sheep .

They are all on the flat now and the sheep have access to them and never bother them .

I used blocks to level them because i Have top feeders .

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2 hours ago, kaihoka said:

They are all on the flat now and the sheep have access to them and never bother them .

Kaihoka, are you particular about the spacing between the hives. Do you have strapping on your hives. I've got my hives fenced off in a paddock where only sheep graze and after line trimming around the hives again today I was wondering if I could just let the sheep graze around them.

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48 minutes ago, BeeGirl said:

Kaihoka, are you particular about the spacing between the hives. Do you have strapping on your hives. I've got my hives fenced off in a paddock where only sheep graze and after line trimming around the hives again today I was wondering if I could just let the sheep graze around them.

My hives are strapped and I let sheep graze right up to them, no fencing, saves trimming or spraying.

 

cattle are a different matter!

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52 minutes ago, Pinnacle said:

My hives are strapped and I let sheep graze right up to them, no fencing, saves trimming or spraying.

Have you tried your hives around sheep without strapping?

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19 minutes ago, BeeGirl said:

Have you tried your hives around sheep without strapping?

No sorry. I like straps. They’re cheap and stop hives from falling over.

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19 minutes ago, BeeGirl said:

Have you tried your hives around sheep without strapping?

Yep.

Not a problem unless you have old rams who can be quite destructive.

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10 hours ago, BeeGirl said:

Kaihoka, are you particular about the spacing between the hives. Do you have strapping on your hives. I've got my hives fenced off in a paddock where only sheep graze and after line trimming around the hives again today I was wondering if I could just let the sheep graze around them.

My hives are not strapped and my sheep actively avoid the hives .

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I have a few apiarys with long grass and apart from stamping it down a bit as I work the hives I find it makes no difference at all to the hives. I certainly don't spray, mow or trim. I prefer to have sheep ran the hives to keep the grass down just because it's easier for me.

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Sheep are okay.

Sloppy terrain is not so cool.

  - many types of work involved and for each it turns out you have to walk up and down the hill all the time

  - the hives facing the hill need cleaning the area in the front of the entries(not so often but .....) while those facing the valley will be more difficult to reach when they get tall

 

There is always a bit of flat-ish area next to the pallet to rest a box. However it will be easier on a fully flat terrain.

In this particular case I did not want to place the hives at the top of the hill because I will be in the way of the farmer while at the bottom of the hill are more trees(more shade and humidity in the winter).

Slope.JPG

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Thanks for the advice folks. I have decided to go ahead with the site for now. Will see if my QCs get mated and will give it a season to work out the difficulty of the slope. 

 

This is how I have set it up and will add more platforms/hives over the coming weeks (these are double nucs:

 

 

DC396416-11E2-4B6D-BC8D-A534A152132C.jpeg

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How have people got on with lambs around hives? my adult sheep have been fine in a paddock with unstrapped unfenced hives, but I pick up a new ram tomorrow and will hopefully have lambs in spring, always a joy to watch them running races at the end of the day and playing who's-king-of-the-castle on any available object, but maybe not a hive?

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I have never known sheep or lamb is to get into trouble round beehives except for one horrible case I remember when  hippy friends tied their pet lamb up right beside a beehive. Despite spending hours removing hundreds of stings from the poor little begger, it still died. No livestock should be confined or tied anywhere near beehives with horses and dogs perhaps being the worst for attracting the attention of bees. They are fine if they can get away but there must be room for the animals to move out of the bees aggressive zone.

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On 20/02/2019 at 8:25 PM, tristan said:

 

sloping sites are a nitemare, even with small number off hives.

very difficult to put any thing down as it will fall down or roll down.

then moving gear up and down gets real hot real quick. it gets exhausting lugging supers up/down even a small slope. it literally be a killer.

 

we have a small site at families place thats a measly 5m up a slope from the drive. its an absolute mission to work those hives.

It really is ay, I had a site 5m up a slope on the side of a gravel road with 12 hives and it was a mission to shift them in and out especially if it had rained. Even carting 24 empty supers for them was a nightmare 

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On Saturday, February 23, 2019 at 7:47 PM, Ahudot said:

How have people got on with lambs around hives? my adult sheep have been fine in a paddock with unstrapped unfenced hives, but I pick up a new ram tomorrow and will hopefully have lambs in spring, always a joy to watch them running races at the end of the day and playing who's-king-of-the-castle on any available object, but maybe not a hive?

I would never have a ram in with my hives .

Most rams have a bad attitude and no brains .

And charge at things for the hell of it , or because something pissed them off and they want something to take it out on .

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